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The St. Mary's Muse 



OPENING NUMBER 



Vol. XXV September-October, 1919 No. 1 



O God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this 
School with Thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with 
the light of the everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; 
increase in us true religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great 
mercy keep us in the same, O blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the 
Son, together, we worship and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



Almighty Father, whose mercy is over all Thy works, bless, we beseech Thee, 
with Thy providential care St. Mary's School and all schools and colleges of 
Christian education, and prosper all right efforts for their support. Help us 
in the work being done for the improvement and endowment of this School, 
to pray earnestly, to labor diligently, and to give generously. Grant to the 
teachers and the taught the light of Thy Holy Spirit to lead them into all 
truth and to build them up in Christian grace and character: for the sake of 
Thy Kingdom and the honor of Thy name, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. 
Amen. . 

fllma Mater 

(Tune: "Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young Charms.") 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree, 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. H. E. H., 1905. 

14146 



The St. Mart's Muse 



The SeveQty-eighth OpeQing of St. Mary's 

Due to a slight and unexpected delay in completing the summer 
improvements, the seventy-eighth opening of St. Mary's School was 
changed from the usual Thursday to Saturday, September 20th. 

Mr. Stone, assisted by Miss Gesner, Miss Leggett and Miss 
Quackenbos, met the girls at the train. To the Seniors, returning 
a day earlier than the other "Old Girls" as is the custom of St. 
Mary's, everything was very dear and familiar, especially the faces 
of old friends and classmates and the excited shouts of welcome that 
greeted the arrival of each one of them. Though the Senior Class 
this year is unusually large, the girls soon lost each other and them- 
selves among the innumerable strangers, who, however, with their 
help soon lost the first hopeless feeling of utter aloneness and began 
to make themselves at home amid their new surroundings. 

The next morning at breakfast came the announcement of an 
English test for new students in the Study Hall. The "Old Girl" 
smiled and said, "Thank goodness, that's one thing I get out of." 
Then she turned and answered the Freshman's question, "Is it very 
bad ?" with a gay laugh and "Oh, you are sure to get through. It's 
nothing you'll mind at all." 

Then came the job of getting matriculation cards straight. Here 
everyone was puzzled, from the Preps to the Seniors. "Must I take 
B Latin or A Math? M French or B Spanish?" were familiar 
questions. 

In the afternoon the other "Old Girls" began to arrive, and again 
everything was confusion and rejoicing. Walking arm in arm 
through the buildings they "Oh'd" and "Ah'd" in amazement at 
the transformation of a mere Main Building into a Smedes Hall 
that must excel the founder's wildest dreams. 

On Saturday morning, September 20th, at the opening Chapel 
service, Bishop Cheshire, President of the Board of Trustees, wel- 
comed the girls and teachers in a brief but very helpful address. 
Assisting Bishop Cheshire and the Rector were Rev. Julian E. Ingle 
and Rev. M. A. Barber, members of the Board of Trustees, and 
Rev. C. A. Ashby, Rector of The Good Shepherd Church. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Mr. W. EL Jones, just assuming his duties as Director of the 
Music Department, was at the organ. The music was full and strong 
and the choir unusually large, and so the Chapel music promises 
to continue helpful and inspiring. 

There is every prospect of having a most successful session this 
year. The School is filled to its capacity, having an enrollment of 
a hundred and ninety-nine resident students. 

C. M. M. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price Two Dollars 

Single Copies *******' Twenty-five Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1919-20 
Mart T. Yellott, '20, Editor-in-Chief 
Catherine Miller, '20 Catharine Boyd, '20 

Crichton Thobne, '23 Mabel Norfleet, '23 

Frances Venable, '22 Louise Powell, '22 

Jane Ruffin, '20, Business Manager 
Ernest Cruikshank, Faculty Director 

EDITORIAL 

With this Opening Number of the Monthly Mtjse the new Edi- 
torial Staff enters upon its journalistic career. We have not attempted 
anything elaborate in this first number of the Muse, and crave the 
indulgence of our readers in perusing its pages. The greater part 
of its bulk is made up of the Commencement news, which, if some- 
what out of date, will, we hope, prove interesting reading both to 
the Old Girls, in reminding them of "the happy days of the years 
gone by," and to the ISTew, in giving them an idea of what St. Mary's 
really is like, and how the girls, when conflicts are settled, schedules 
arranged, and the work eventually brought to a successful conclu- 
sion, feel towards their Alma Mater. 

Ours is a school of widely diversified interests. It is not all a 
monotonous round of classes, as a new girl at the beginning of the 
year may be led to suppose. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



There are the Athletic Associations, an outlet for all the exuber- 
ant "animal spirits" the bright Autumn days are certain to produce. 
Basket ball is a sure antidote for the blues ! Whether Mu or Sigma, 
show your pep by going out for practice, and attending the games 
and rooting for your side if you aren't so lucky as to make a team. 
Better luck next time ! 

There is the Junior Auxiliary, which is this year again to take 
a prominent place in the school activities. The Blue Bidge delegates 
have set out in a very determined manner to share the "Blue Bidge 
inspiration" with their less fortunate fellows who had not the oppor- 
tunity of getting it at first hand. We are betting on Katherine Batts, 
with her carefully prepared plans, to prove a worthy successor of 
Susan Smith and Elizabeth Waddell, and to make of the Junior 
Auxiliary this year the success that she feels it should be. 

Then there are the Literary Societies, with the great contest 
always hanging in the balance, and the Muse as a constant spur. 
You may not be able to represent your Society in the Annual Debate ; 
perhaps you cannot even read or recite in public, but you can still 
feel that you have a share in the Muse. This year it is our plan to 
publish eight issues of the Monthly, an opening number, a com- 
mencement number, and six numbers between, these six to be in 
the hands of the Literary Societies, each Society getting out three 
numbers. Selected judges will decide which Society has published 
the best two out of the three numbers, and this will count twenty-two 
and a half points in the Literary Society Contest. When you write 
for the Muse, however, you are not only working for your Society, 
but you may look at it from a personal standpoint as well. This year 
a prize is offered for the best story, the best poem, and the best essay 
published during the year. To be eligible for a prize, a girl must 
have had two contributions printed in the Muse. So get to work! 
Sharpen your pencil, and your wits, and — who knows but the prize 
may be yours ? 

Not to dwell too long on the subject of the Muse, it is our ambi- 
tion to have every girl in school feel that she is a joint owner in the 
School magazine. It cannot be a real success unless this is the case. 
Of course you are going to take the Muse. But that can never give 



The St. Mart's Muse 



you the feeling of ownership that comes when you see something 
of your own production printed in it. Try it, and enjoy the sensa- 
tion ! You don't have to be a master of the art of writing to write 
for the Muse. On the other hand, never be discouraged because your 
first attempt fails to "get in." Try again, and keep on trying. All 
working together, let us improve both ourselves and each other, and, 
incidentally, this will go a long way towards making our monthly 
Muse of 1919-20 a School magazine of which we can be proud. 



Miss Katie Retires 

After many years of devoted service to St. Mary's as pupil and 
teacher, Miss Katie has retired this year from active service, but 
retains her position as guiding spirit in the Church work of the 
School. It is a great privilege for us to have Miss Katie with us 
again this year, for in her are embodied the sacred traditions and 
ideals of St. Mary's, enduring through all the many changes the 
School has undergone in the last few years. The St. Mary's girls, 
old and new, join with the trustees of the School, who, at their annual 
meeting on last Commencement Day, adopted the following resolu- 
tion of love and respect to Miss Katie : 

Resolved: That this Hoard extends its thanks and gratitude to Miss Kate 
McKimmon for her long and faithful service to St. Mary's School, covering 
a period of more than a half century as pupil and teacher. 

Her love for and loyalty to St. Mary's and all its traditions are well known 
to us all. She has made a place in the hearts of scores of St. Mary's girls 
in the Primary Department of the School. In fact "Miss Katie" has for years 
practically been the Primary Department, and she has made a place also in 
the hearts of hundreds and hundreds of St. Mary's girls who now remember 
her with affection and gratitude the country over. 

We rejoice that while she is to give up further active teaching, she is to 
continue her connection with the School, which is so dear to her and which 
she has served so faithfully and so well. 

The old St. Mary's girls who come back from time to time find in her the 
same devoted and loyal friend that she was during their school days here. 

"We wish for her all the joy and happiness to which we feel she is entitled 
after so long and faithful service at St. Mary's. 

Waeben W. Way, Director. 
Milton A. Baebeb. 
H. Noewood Bowne. 



The St. Maey's Muse 



Dr. Lay Returns to North Carolina 

Their many Tarheel friends were glad to learn that Dr. Lay and 
his family, after a little over a year in Springfield, Mass., have 
returned to the Old Worth State, where Dr. Lay is to have charge 
of the church in Beaufort. The following is a clipping from one 
of the Springfield papers : 

Rev. Dr. George W. Lay, who served as minister in charge at Christ Epis- 
copal Church during the absence of the rector, Rev. John M. McGann, and 
who since that time has been associate rector of the church, has accepted 
a call to Beaufort, N. C, and is to leave the city the latter part of Sep- 
tember, his resignation taking effect the 15th of the month. Dr. Lay goes to 
become rector of St. Paul's Church in Beaufort and to take charge of the 
nearby mission at Morehead, both in the diocese of East Carolina. 

Dr. Lay came to the city August 21, 1918, having been for eleven years 
rector of St. Mary's School at Raleigh, N. C. For the five months that Rev. 
Dr. McGann was engaged in Young Men's Christian Association work in 
France, he served faithfully and efficiently as minister in charge of the 
parish and since his return has been continuing as associate rector of the 
church. He came to the city directly after Rev. Edmund R. Laine, Jr., left 
to become a chaplain in the Army. 

Dr. Lay and his family, who have been occupying the home on Crescent 
Hill of Miss Annie and Miss Louise Stebbins during the summer, expect to 
leave the city soon after the 15th for their new home. They have made 
many friends here who sincerely regret their departure. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



September 20th— The Opening Reception 

On Saturday evening, September 20th, the Old Girls welcomed 
the New Girls with a delightful reception in the new "lobby" of 
Smedes Hall. Those receiving were the Eector and Mrs. Way, Mrs. 
Perkins, the new Lady Principal, Miss Katie, Miss Dowd, and 
Nancy Lay, the President of the new Senior Class. 

Very popular was the corner of the room where, presiding at a 
prettily decorated table, Jane Toy and Mary Yellott served sparkling 
fruit punch, while Elizabeth Branson and Katherine Waddell, mem- 
bers of the Junior Class, passed little cakes among the guests. 



The St. Maby's Muse 



Then the dancing began. Her escort had previously presented 
each New Girl with an attractive card, on which were written her 
"dates" for the dancing and conversation. The lobby was crowded 
and dancing was a little difficult at times, but no one seemed to care 
about that. The girls were there to get acquainted and to have a 
good time. They did both and when, at the sound of the nine-thirty 
bell, the pianist struck up "Home Sweet Home," every one left with 
a feeling of real regret. C. B. 



September 25tb— Mr. JacRsor/s Talk 

On Thursday, Sept. 25th, the girls assembled in the School Room 
for the usual Thursday night talk. Owing to Mr. Way's absence, 
the Rev. John Long Jackson, rector of St. Martin's Church, Char- 
lotte, was asked to speak. Mr. Jackson is Secretary of the Nation- 
wide Campaign in the Diocese of North Carolina and his address, 
which dealt largely with this movement, was most interesting and 
inspiring. During the few minutes in which he talked, he brought 
out many points that were new and startling to us. Among these 
was the fact that, while we speak with pride of the United States 
as a Christian nation, the number of Christians here is comparatively 
small. Mr. Jackson spoke of the many helpful positions which are 
open to the wide-awake girl of today, the need of missionaries for 
the foreign fields, and the necessity of thinking about our life work 
while we are young. C. B. 



September 27th/— The Expression Class Entertairjs 

On September 27th, the second Saturday evening after School 
opened, the girls gathered in the Auditorium for the first entertain- 
ment of the season. The program consisted of several musical num- 
bers and a one-act play, produced last spring by four of Miss Davis' 
private expression pupils and revived for the occasion on very short 
notice. 

The opening chord was struck by Nancy Lay, accompanying 
Estelle Avent, who sang several popular songs so beautifully that, 



The St. Mary's Muse 



when reinforced by Edith Miller's violin obligato in "Sweet 
Hawaiian Moonlight," several in the audience were moved to tears. 

From 1 the moment the curtain rose on "Joint Owners in Spain" 
the audience shrieked with mirth, for who could refrain from laugh- 
ing when Crichton Thorne, as Miss Dyer, sobbed "I ain't a well 
woman, and I ain't been for nigh these twenty years — and I ain't 
seen the worst yet, 'cause the worst ain't come !" or when Millicent 
Blanton, as Mrs. Blair, in her most astonishing manner took charge 
of Miss Dyer as well as her room, and showed her that she could 
be cheerful even if she hadn't been well for "nigh these twenty 
years" ! Mildred Dawson, as Miss Fullerton, shook and trembled 
so artistically that hysterics threatened the audience, while Catherine 
Miller made an ideal matron for the Old Ladies' Home. 

We wish to extend our heartiest thanks to Miss Davis and the 
girls who worked so hard to make this very enjoyable evening pos- 
sible for us. M. 1ST. 



September 28th— Mrs. Way Entertains the Faculty 

Mr. and Mrs. Way entertained the faculty and officers of St. 
Mary's at after-dinner coffee on Sunday, September 28th. This was 
the first informal social occasion for the faculty and officers since 
the opening of the School and it proved to be a most enjoyable one. 

C. M. M. 



September 30th — The Opening E. A. P. Meeting 

The opening meeting of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 
took place in the lobby on Tuesday evening, September 30th. In 
accordance with the plans drawn up just before school closed last 
spring, the whole school was extended a cordial invitation, and as 
a result a good crowd was on hand. 

The program, dealing with St. Mary's topics, was unusually inter- 
esting and was well rendered. Jane Toy, the E. A. P. President, 
opened the meeting with a short address of welcome, after which 
"Alma Mater" was sung by all. Then Dorothy Kirtland read an 
amusing poem on "The First Week at School," which was loudly 



10 The St. Mary's Muse 



applauded as Dorothy always is, whenever and however she appears 
in public. Next Nancy Lay and Mary Yellott sang "Sweet William," 
which was received with the same appreciation as when, last year, 
Ellen Lay and Elizabeth Waddell first sang it at the School Party. 
The chief events of the fall term were described in an interesting 
and entertaining way by Nina Cooper, Catharine Boyd and Frances 
Mountcastle, who read short papers on "The Great State Fair," 
"Hallowe'en" and "The Christmas Tree." Millicent Blanton read 
again Jane Toy "Life at St, Mary's," which if the new girls could 
not fully appreciate they nevertheless applauded vigorously. The 
program, which had been greatly enjoyed by all, closed with the 
singing of "Hail St. Mary's." C. B. 



THE SUMMER IMPROVEMENTS 

The School session of 1919-20 introduced to us a new St. Mary's 
from basement to third floor. Everywhere things were new and 
changed. 

As we entered Main Building, now Smedes Hall, the change from 
the one to the other was at once apparent. Blazing light and startling 
whiteness first attracted our attention, which, however, was soon 
claimed by the handsome new mahogany furniture, especially the 
mirror, whose object we could not at first quite see, but which we 
have since found useful in the last minute arranging of hats and 
chapel caps! Gone the broad, low staircase and the little dark 
crooked stairs behind, and in their place we found a new spiral stair- 
case winding artistically up to the third floor with a skylight of 
generous proportions lighting it all the way. 

The lobby on the second floor of Smedes Hall is an addition to 
St. Mary's which at the beginning of school came in very conveniently 
for the first joint meeting of the two Literary Societies and for 
several entertainments and the nightly half hour of dancing. This 
spacious hall almost took the place of our beloved parlor, which was 
then closed but on the third Saturday night was reopened to an 
admiring throng. The predominant note in the color scheme is brown, 
shading from the soft tan of the paper to the rich mahogany of the 



The St. Mary's Muse 11 



great beams across the ceiling. We had hoped that Mr. Erwin might 
be with us for the opening and that we might on that occasion express 
to him in person our appreciation of all that he has done to make 
Smedes Hall a possibility. 

All over the building rooms have been newly plastered or papered 
and many new rooms have been added. The tiled bathrooms in 
Smedes Hall are a luxury we must admit we never expected to 
indulge in at St. Mary's ! 

The cement basement of last year has undergone numerous 
changes. The floors are now of wood, and the walls boast fresh white 
plastering. The old dining room has been divided into two modern 
school rooms, and the "grill room," somewhat to our selfish regret, 
has been converted into a very neat corner of the large Domestic 
Science room, which, through a front of glass doors, now proudly 
displays long rows of shiny cooking utensils and little gas stoves. 

In West Rock the lingering remnant of the old dormitory has 
been divided into airy, comfortable rooms, and in East Rock the 
former "Teachers' Sitting Room" now bears a placard denoting it 
as the "Office" where, on week days, a crowd of impatient girls may 
be found at almost any hour, waiting to see Mr. Cruikshank, and 
on Saturday evenings a crowd of equally impatient young men, to 
see — er — Mr. Way. 

The walls and woodwork of the Infirmary have been repainted 
with an ivory tint, the dear desire of "Miss Alec's" heart, and by 
which the whole effect of the interior is softened and brightened. 

The greatly enlarged Laundry has been provided with a number 
of new electric irons, and the prompt delivery of our laundry bears 
witness that these are put to excellent use. We have little fear of 
the coming cold weather, as a much larger and more efficient heating 
plant has been installed and many new radiators have taken the place 
of the old ones. 

Senior Hall is now being used entirely for students' rooms, while, 
driven from house and home, the Cruikshanks have sought refuge 
where best they might find it. They had expected to be comfortably 
settled in their new bungalow by the time school opened, but when 
we arrived a little heap of bricks out by the Auditorium was the 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 

only indication of the fact. Among all the much needed improve- 
ments at St. Mary's we think there was none more needed than a 
comfortable home for the Business Manager and his family, and 
when the bungalow is completed, in our opinion it will be the greatest 
improvement of all. C. T. 



WITH THE SENIORS OF 1919 

Mildred Kirtland, the President, during the early part of October 
was visiting in Alabama. She spent part of her time at Alice Seed's,, 
going from there to JSTew York. At present, she expects to come 
down to St. Mary's for Fair Week. 

Elizabeth Kitchin and Margaret Fallon are the only members of 
the Class who are continuing the pursuit of "higher education." 
Elizabeth is to be at Hollins this winter, while Margaret, having put 
in her application too late to take a post-graduate business course 
at St. Mary's is at Salem. 

Directly after school closed Ellen Lay visited Helen Battle near 
Tarboro, and then attended the University Commencement at Chapel 
Hill. After this short vacation she went to Goldsboro as Local Secre- 
tary in the War Camp Community Service and has there been so 
successful that when the W. C. C. S. was withdrawn in the non- 
camp towns of the State on September 1st, the people in G-oldsboro 
continued the work and her position in charge of the temporary 
Community Building. We enjoyed very much the flying visit she 
paid us over the week-end of October 4th-6th. 

Bertha Albertson is putting her business course into practice this 
winter. She is a stenographer for Scotland Neck's well known 
lawyer, Mr. Ashby Dunn. 

Our ex-Business Manager, Louise Toler, after continuing her 
business year through a very successful summer in the insurance 
business, has now turned her talents in another direction. She is 
teaching music in Rocky Mount and when here for the Opening 
reported a large and flourishing class. She is, however, not the only 
teacher among the Seniors of '19, for 'tis rumored that Bonie, yes, 
Bonie, is teaching near Tryon! And Helen Battle, after a summer 
at home, except for two glorious weeks at the Rod and Gun Club, 



The St. Mary's Muse 13 



has given up the pursuit of pleasure in favor of teaching the young 
intelligence to shoot and is now mistress of the Cross-roads School 
near her home. 

After Commencement, Marian Drane and Mary C. Wilson went 
home with Nina Burke. They came back with glowing accounts of 
the wonders of Louisiana and of the fine time they had had at 
Nina's. Mary is keeping house for her mother this winter, Marian 
is to spend October in Connecticut with a friend of her sister's, and 
Nina is in New York at present. Marian and Nina both intend to 
stop by at St. Mary's on their way home. 

Josephine Erwin paid us a brief and unexpected call shortly after 
school opened. She and Elizabeth Waddell seem to be following 
Mary Wilson's example — they both expect to be at home this winter. 
"Waddy" writes that she is coming up around Thanksgiving time for 
our first big basket ball game of the season. Here's a hearty invita- 
tion to the rest of the Class to do the same ! F. P. V. 



CHANGES IN THE FACULTY 

What are we going to do without them, the teachers and friends 
who didn't come back to us this year ? Miss Jones is away out in 
Oregon, back at her old place in Miss Catlin's School for Girls, and 
Miss Meares intends to teach near her hom'e in South Carolina this 
winter. She has just finished a busy summer at Blue Ridge, where 
the experience she got as "Hall Mother" at St. Mary's stood her in 
good stead as Housekeeper. 

Miss Shields, after leaving St. Mary's midst the tearful fare- 
wells of her many friends, went to Chapel Hill for the summer, 
where she made good use of her business ability as Prof. Branson's 
secretary. This winter she is to be at home with her mother, and 
has gone back to teaching music, in which she was so successful at 
St. Mary's. On her way through Raleigh she has twice stopped by 
just long enough to say "Hello" to us. 

Miss Trowbridge is demonstrating Domestic Art and Science to 
little would-be housekeepers down in Birmingham, Alabama, at the 
Central High School. 



14 The St. Mart's Muse 

After school closed, Miss Thornton became interested in War 
Camp Community Service and quickly rose to prominence in that 
work. She is at present in the editorial department of the Play- 
ground Recreation Association in !N"ew York City. 

Disappointed in her hope of spending a year in France, Miss 
Sheppard is parlying Francais with the French students at the High 
School in Connellsville, Pa. 

After teaching here for a few months, Miss Caton accepted a 
position in the Randolph-Macon Institute at Danville, Ya., where 
she is now teaching Math. 

It seems impossible to get any very definite information as to the 
present whereabouts and intentions of Dorothy Ambler and Kathryn 
McDowell. So far as we know, Kitty is at home, but there is a 
rumor abroad that Dot has gone back to her schoolgirl days, and is 
at school in Washington. Miss Giddens also seems to prefer the life 
of a College girl to that of a teacher, and is now working for her 
B. S. at Farmville ]STormal School. 

Last but not least (ladies first, you know) Mr. Owen. How busy 
he must be ! He directs the choir at Christ Church in Savannah, he 
leads the Community Sings, he has a boys' choir and a male quartette 
in his charge, and in addition to all this he still finds time for a 
number of private pupils. We can only wish him as great success 
in his work as in his old, while at St. Mary's. 

The new teachers have won our hearts already. Mrs. Charles E. 
Perkins comes to us from the National Cathedral School in Washing- 
ton and is proving an efficient and sympathetic Lady Principal. 
Miss Genevieve Leggett is teaching our Domestic Art and Science 
pupils. From Oswega, 1ST. Y., Miss Marguerite Gesner brings a 
charming voice and joy to the girls on first floor West Wing. She 
is giving vocal lessons. Miss Elizabeth Shearer is listening to, and 
remaining cheerful under, painful French conversation. Twice as 
remarkable is the unfailing good cheer of Miss Katherine Quack- 
enbos, who has classes both in French and Spanish. Miss Mary 
Searle is in charge of the Mathematics department, and Miss Loulie 
M. Wilson has the Latin classes. Miss Anne ISTeave has taken Dot 
Ambler's place as Office Secretary, and Miss Florence Talbot has 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 



succeeded Kitty McDowell as our busy housekeeper. Mr. William 
H. Jones (again a case of ladies first) is filling Mr. Owen's place 
as Director of the Music Department. He is an organist of rare 
ability, and under him the chorus and Chapel music gives promise 
of maintaining its usual high standard. L. P. 



THE 1919 COMMENCEMENT 

The session of 1918-1919 has been signalized by the largest enrollment of 
resident students that St. Mary's has ever had and the Commencement sea- 
son was a happy and successful ending to the year's work. Nature put 
forth her best efforts to make every one comfortable, and the special Com- 
mencement speakers, Bishop Milkell and Mr. John Stuart Bryan, each in his 
way, made a deep impression on all who heard them. 

Commencement Program 1919 

Saturday, May 25, 8:30 p.m. — Annual Elocution Recital in the Auditorium. 

Sunday, May 26, 11:00 a.m. — Commencement Sermon in the Chapel by the 
Rt. Rev. H. J. Mikell, D.D., Bishop of Atlanta. 

5:00 p.m. — Alumnae Service in the Chapel. 

Monday, May 27, 11:00 a.m. — Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

4:30 p.m. — Annual Alumnae Meeting in the Parlor. 

5:30 p.m. — Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the Studio. 

8:30 p.m. — Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 

9:30 p.m. — Rector's Reception in Honor of the Graduating Class in the 
School Parlor. 

Tuesday, May 28, 11:00 a.m. — Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. 

Annual Address by Mr. John Stewart Bryan, of Richmond, Va. 

Closing Exercises in the Chapel. 

Saturday Night 

The Annual Recital of the Expression Department 

The annual recital of the Expression Department, under the direction of 
Miss Florence Davis, has come to be looked forward to as one of the special 
features of the Commencement Season. There is never the element of 
sameness in these annual appearances of the Dramatic Club and Miss Davis 
has been equally successful in her presentation of Shakespeare's plays, of 
Tennyson's "Princess," of the group of Little Theater plays which she gave 
last year, and of the plays from the French which formed the program this 
year. The performance is always finished, well costumed, and true to the 
spirit of the play, and reflects credit on the actors and on the director. This 
year's program was rather ambitious and included Moliere's Seventeenth 
Century play, "Les Precieuses Ridicules," and Rostand's Eighteenth Century 



16 The St. Maey's Muse 

play, "Les Romanesques." Both comedies are famous and their presenta- 
tion at this Commencement won hearty favor from the large audience. 

"Les Precieuses Ridicules" is a wholesome and much needed protest against 
excessive freedom from restraint which characterized the language and man- 
ners during the Seventeenth Century and was threatening the French 
language. 

"Les Romanesques" was first presented in 1890. Being more modern and 
with its more striking human interest features, it made probably more of an 
appeal on the audience. "All the world loves a lover," and the purpose of 
Rostand in making a plea for more poetry in life is carefully portrayed by 
Sylvette and Percinet, which characters were taken by the old St. Mary's 
favorites, Mary C. Wilson and Millicent Blanton. 

To most of the audience it was a pleasing innovation that the costumes in 
both plays were true to life and to the period in which the scenes were laid. 
The parts were all well taken and the audience showed its appreciation by 
frequent and discriminating applause. 

The cast of the plays was as follows: 



"LES PRECIEUSES RIDICULES" 

(the affected young ladies) 
A Comedy in One Act, by Moliere 



Deamatis Persons 

Du Croisy ") f Mary Yellott 

La Grange \ RejeCted L ° VerS |. Crichton Thorne 

Gorgibus, Rich Merchant Ellen Lay 

Magedelon, Daughter of Gorgibus Virginia Howell 

Cathos, Niece of Gorgibus Elizabeth Bonner 

Marotte, Servant of the Affected Young Ladies Mary Moffitt 

The Marquis de Mascarille, Valet of La Grange Dorothy Kirtland 

The Viscount de Jodelet, Valet of Du Croisy Mildred Cooley 

Scene: Garden of Gorgibus, Paris 
Period: 17th Century 



"LES ROMANESQUES" 

(the romancers) 

A Three-Act Comedy, by Rostand 



Dramatis Persons 

Sylvette Mary C. Wilson 

Percinet Millicent Blanton 

Straf orel Kathryn Keith 

Bergamin Elizabeth Bowne 

Pasquinot Jane Toy 

Musicians, Swordsmen, etc. 

Sc Cne: Gardens of Bergamin and Pasquinot 

Period: 18th Century 



The St. Mary's Muse 17 



Sunday 

Commencement Sunday was ushered in by the celebration of the Holy Com- 
munion in the Chapel at eight o'clock. Bishop Cheshire was the celebrant, 
assisted by the Rector. 

<At eleven o'clock, the sermon was preached by the Bishop of Atlanta, the 
Rt. Rev. Henry J. Mikell, D.D., and some idea of the main points of his 
notable sermon may be had from the following extract from the News and 
Observer: 

Vividly holding up before them the dangers that might come from pursuit 
in quest of political aspirations and eloquently reminding them of the 
sacredness of motherhood and sisterhood to society, Rt. Rev. H. J. Mikell, 
D.D., Bishop of Atlanta, yesterday morning delivered the baccalaureate ser- 
mon to the St. Mary's graduates, the services noting the onset of the seventy- 
seventh annual commencement of the school. 

Drawing distinction between ideals old and new, Bishop Mikell preached 
from St. Matthew 13*52: "Therefore, every scribe which is instructed unto 
the Kingdom of Heaven is like unto a man that is an householder, which 
bringeth forth out of his treasure things new and old." 

The minister assigned to the young graduates the place occupied by this 
householder referred to by Jesus, now clinging fast to the traditions and 
memories of the four years that have gone before and anxiously looking to 
a realization of bright hopes of the future. Like the possibilities that 
attend the unfurling of a new flag on the field of battle, the new life is 
attended with opportunities tremendous. Contrasting the difference in the 
physical ideals of woman a generation ago and today, he declared that the 
coming years hold many new ideals for the sex. 

"The woman of a generation ago," said Bishop Mikell, "was most noted 
for the ease with which she could swoon away and the grace with which she 
could weep. The physical ideal today is more like the Greek Atalanta." 
And as he continued his sermon, he pictured the possibilities of womanly 
athletes, after Atalanta's mould, halting to pick up the apple that might fall 
in her path and, alas, lose the race. 

"There is no use to belittle the physical life, though," continued Bishop 
Mikell, "for youth is the best time to enjoy it. The danger is in forgetting 
the Giver of that life in enjoying it." 

The physical life, alone, he paused to say, is responsible for the sin and 
misery of the world. The body he defined a splendid servant but a dreadful 
master. 

There is also a wide difference in the intellectual ideal of woman today 
and woman a generation ago, said Bishop Mikell. A generation ago, all 
a woman needed to know was a little French, nothing about English litera- 
ture, and how to play "A Maiden's Prayer" on the harpsichord. 

"And now-a-days there are women who would know the beautiful things 
and have the features of a great, big, beautiful doll," he added, with effective 
expression. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse 

The need is not so much for learned women, he continued, as it is for 
women who think, the Virgin Mary affording an illustration. She read the 
hest literature of her age, and the brand of uplift borne of reading great 
poetry and books is sorely needed today, he pointed out. 

"The coming years hold new industrial ideas and new political aspira- 
tions for women. The danger and temptation is in seizing the new treasure 
and relinquishing the old. It would be a loss and not a gain to the world. 
If in gaining these things," he declared, she loses the opportunity of making 
a Christian home, both she and society are losers." 

He depicted with feeling the prospects of losing the word "Mother" and 
coining in its stead "Stateswoman" and expressed grave concern over the 
survival of the motherhood and sisterhood of the world. 

"There have been women holding to all that woman has done and accom- 
plishing all that man has done," he suggested, "but others have missed both 
ideals. It is the 'eternal feminine' that draws ever upward and onward." 

"It has been the influence of Jesus Christ," he concluded, "that has given 
power to all the learning of the world. To forget this is as unwise as the 
base Indian who threw away his pearl, better than all his truck." 

At the afternoon service at five o'clock, which is known as the Alumnae 
Service, the Rector addressed himself more particularly to the visiting 
Alumnae, welcoming them back as paying a visit to their home and family. 
His brief address on the spirit of St. Mary's emphasized the essential facts 
for which the School stands as simplicity, sincerity, and sanctity. 

Monday 

The beginning of Class Day is much earlier than the audience, which 
assembles in the Grove at eleven o'clock, is apt to imagine, for one who 
cared to get up and investigate in the Muse room would find the Juniors 
as early as five in the morning busily weaving the daisy chain, which is to 
the Seniors such an important part of the Class Day exercises. There were 
more Juniors this year than usual to make the chain and apparently there 
were more daisies, for so massive and extensive was the chain that it seemed 
the surrounding country must have been scoured for flowers. The Seniors 
were very proud of it, and so were the Juniors. The Monday morning cloud, 
following Sunday's rain made the out of doors Class Day program seem well 
nigh impossible, but the sun broke through the clouds just in time, and with 
hurried last hour preparations the scene was made as attractive as hereto- 
fore for the eleven o'clock exercises. 

The program was reminiscent of former years but very thoroughly 
colored with the spirit of the Class. The girls who had enjoyed their own 
Class Day at St. Mary's in years past could feel themselves living it over as 
the procession of the classes, led by the Marshals, came around West Rock 
singing, "In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees," and wound its way through the 
arch in front of Main Building to the scene of the exercises. Then from 
Senior Hall through the Bast Rock covered way came the Seniors with the 



The St. Mart's Muse 19 



daisy chain, led by Eleanor Sublett, Chief Marshal, and joining in the song, 
they took their places in a semi-circle around the platform on which the 
Class President presided. 

Mildred Kirtland, the President, spoke her welcome briefly. Next followed 
the class songs, first used so effectively at the School Party. What they 
lacked in picturesqueness through the simpler costumes of Class Day, they 
made up in volume, and all the classes sang with a will. The history, poem, 
and prophecy of the Class, printed further on in this Muse, were then read. 

The presentation of the athletic banner is a matter of keenest interest to 
the St. Mary's girls of the year, and this year's contest between the Sigma 
and Mu Athletic Associations had been most close, so close, indeed, that it 
took Margaret Barnard's victory in tennis the last Saturday of the year to 
give the Mus the victory, their second year of success. The final score for 
the year was Mu, 94; Sigma, 81, and the banner was gracefully presented to 
the winners by Elizabeth Waddell and was accepted by Nina Burke. 

After the singing of "Goodbye 1919" by the Seniors, the Last Will and 
Testament was read and then came that interesting feature of Class Days, 
the announcement of the dedication of the Annual, which is kept secret until 
the moment. Louise Toler, Business Manager of the Muse, read the dedi- 
cation: 

To the Reverend 

WARREN WADE DAY 

Who in This, the First Year of His Rectorship, Has 

Endeared Himself to All Those 

Connected With 

St. Mary's School 

and in Whom We Feel That All St. Mary's Girls Have 

'An Inspiring Leader" 

"A Wise Counselor" 

"A Steadfast Friend" 
This Twenty-first Volume of the Annual Muse is Lovingly Dedicated 
By the Senior Class 
For the St. Mary's Girls of 1918-19 

Miss Toler then presented Annuals to Bishop Cheshire. Bishop Mikell, 
Mr. Bryan, Miss McKimmon and other special friends of the Class and of the 
students as has been done in the past. 

Anita Smith sang "Good-bye School," with the Seniors joining in the 
chorus, and then with the singing of "Alma Mater" the exercises were over. 

And, as every old girl of recent years remembers, then came the rush to 
the postoffice to get the Muse and see, each for herself, just how far the 
Annual measured up to the expectations which had been so eagerly formed 
in the weeks just past. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 



Annual Alumnce Meeting 

The annual meeting of the St. Mary's Alumnae Association was held in the 
Grove Monday afternoon at 4:30. Miss Nannie Ashe of Raleigh, Vice- 
President, presided in the absence from the city of Mrs. Thomas W. Bickett, 
President. Prayer by Rev. Warren Way, Rector of St. Mary's, opened the 
meeting. 

A roll of the alumnae who have died during the past year was read and 
resolutions of respect to their memory were adopted. These included Mrs. 
Mary Iredell, Mrs. K. P. Battle, Jr., Mrs. Margaret Little, of Raleigh; Mrs. 
Isaac T. Avery, Jr., of Morganton; Mrs. William A. White, of Duke; Mrs. 
Meares Harris, of Wilmington, and Miss Susie Carter, of Asheville. 

On account of war work which had put aside Alumnae matters temporarily, 
it was voted to reelect the President and Vice-President, something which 
had not before been done. The officers for the next year are: Mrs. Thomas 
W. Bickett, President; Mrs. Thomas M. Ashe, Vice-President; Miss Kate 
McKimmon, Secretary; Miss Louise T. Busbee, Assistant Secretary, and Mrs. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Treasurer. 



The Annual Concert 

The annual concert of the Music Department was given in the Auditorium 
at eight-thirty, and was the crowning production of the year in the music 
work of the School. The piano, voice, and violin departments were all 
represented and all the players acquitted themselves with finish and musical 
feeling. That their efforts were appreciated was attested by the enthusiastic 
applause of the large audience present. 

The program follows: 

Part I 

I. Hexentanz MacDowell 

Nancy Lay 

II. Scherzo Mendelssohn 

Edith Hutson 

III. Son of My Heart Spross 

Grace Franklin 

IV. Scherzo van Goens 

Mary Ray 

V. Cavatina, from "Roberto Diavolo" Meyerbeer 

Anita Smith 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 



Part II 

I. a. Barcarolle Spross 

6. March Wind MacDowell 

Florie Bell Morgan 

II. a. Si tu, m'ami Pergolesi 

ft. Robin, Sing Me a Song Spross 

Estelle Avent 

III. Presto, from 1st Modern Suite MacDowell 

Katherine Alston 

IV. Liebstraum Liszt 

Lou Spencer Avent 

V. a. By the Brook Boisdeffre 

b. Spanish Dance Rehfeld 

Bessie Ray 



The Art Exhibit 
Of the art exhibit the News and Observer says: 

The annual art exhibit was unusually attractive this year, and showed 
much talent and originality. There were three certificate pupils, Miss 
Josephine Erwin, whose work in oils made a fine display — three still life 
studies and an interior being the most noticeable; Miss Helen Battle, whose 
clear, excellent water color studies, a "Brass Kettle and Vegetables," an 
"Interior" and a sketch of the "Porch Columns" stand out conspicuously, and 
Miss Susan Linehan, whose still life studies, an "Interior" and "Out-Door 
Sketch of Wisteria" are most charmingly painted. 

Miss Olive Lee has some good work in oil, "Violets in a Brass Bowl" and 
"Snowballs" being the best. Good work done by the specialists in water 
color was a feature of the exhibit, among thds "A Library Corner" by 
Augusta Rembert. Conspicuous were some fine landscapes by Mary Fetter, 
Carmen Jones, Mary Wallace and Belle Besselieu, a "Tea Group" by Dor- 
othy Kirtland, and some remarkably clever time-sketches done in two or 
four hours by all the students. The lamp and candle shades show origin- 
ality in designing; those done by Mahallah Mteekins and Margaret Yorke 
are the best. The poster work is very clever, ten on war topics and ten on 
commercial art. The best of the former is by Miss Martina Carr, an 
illustration of "Flanders' Fields," and the best of the latter are by Misses 
Ella Rogers and Hope Eccles. The cast drawings are excellent, "A Slave 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Head" by Jane Ruffin being among the best. Tbe mechanical drawings 
by Miss Elizabeth Branson show careful work and the designs by Miss 
Margaret Yorke deserve special mention. The pencil drawings of the first 
year work done by Harriet Barber, Evelyn Way and Madeline Jones show 
promise of good future work. 

Altogether it is one of the best exhibits the school has ever had and 
reflects much credit on the pupils under the skillful guidance of Miss 
Clara Fenner. 

At the same time as the Art Exhibit, there was a very creditable exhibit 
by the Domestic Art class of the Home Economics Department of work done 
under the inspection of the head of this department, Miss Mildred Trow- 
bridge. 



The Rector's Reception 

The Rector's annual reception to the graduating class was held in the 
School Parlor immediately after the Annual Concert. 

The Commencement visitors, including the parents, relations, and friends 
of the graduating class and the old girls, were welcomed by Mr. and Mrs. 
Way, Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire, Miss Jones, Miss Katie, and the thirteen 
graduates. 



Tuesday 



The day was most fittingly begun by a celebration of the Holy Eucharist 
in the Chapel at ten minutes of seven, which was largely attended. Fol- 
lowing the custom of many years, the Rector was Celebrant, assisted by 
one of the trustees, Rev. F. P. Lobdell. 

11 A.M. COMMENCEMENT DAY EXERCISES 
(In the Auditorium) 
The following program was presented: 

Piano Solo : Valse Caprice Geehl 

Marietta Gareissen 

Salutatory Marian Drane 

Class Essay: "Leonardo da Vinci" Helen Van Wyck Battle 

Address Mr. John Stewart Bryan 

Vocal Solo: Sweetheart Sigh No More Manney 

Anita Smith 

Violin Obligato Edith Miller 

Valedictory Elizabeth Kitchin 

Announcement of Honors 

Presentation of Diplomas, Certificates and Distinctions 

The News and Observer wrote as follows about Mr. Bryan's notable address: 

Speaking to the graduates upon the importance of educating character as 

well as mind, John Joseph Bryan, publisher of the Richmond News-Leader* 



The St. Mary's Muse 23 

admonished the young ladies not to seek after an over-dose of success in 
a material way. 

Mr. Bryan chose no particular theme for his address, rather leaning to 
a discussion of the beauty and simplicity of a life founded on the spirit of 
righteousness and truth. He ridiculed the shams and whims of the world 
in a gentle vein, suggested a continuation of the spiritual things with which 
the young ladies had been in touch through their years in school, and 
implored them to strive for enduring success. 

He confessed to a particular fondness for St. Mary's School. This, Mr. 
Bryan attributed to the reason that St. Mary's is a school that seeks to 
instruct after the old masters rather than engage in "finishing" under the 
tutelage of a woman with "neatly manicured nails and an eye on France 
for the summer." 

Declaring that the power of victory in woman had been unfolded to the 
world by the war, he called attention to the English women and their plea 
for "work, not pensions," when the munition factories were closed, and they 
were told to go back to their tea rooms in the cities. 

"The English and French women did as much to win the war as the men," 
said Mr. Bryan, "and I don't think any of us understand how much the men 
of France did." 

Over a million Frenchmen are under the sod, he reminded his audience, 
and had America lost in proportion to population as did France, there would 
have been over two and one-half million deaths to mourn by those left over 
here. 

"These things are appalling," he continued, "but we fail to grasp the new 
forces that have been unleashed by the war. There isn't any girl here this 
morning who hasn't more information than had Joan of Arc, whose spirit," 
he insisted, "was responsible for the valor of the French in the world 
struggle. 

"There is no question about what won the war," he ventured. "The 
Americans helped, the English and French held them awhile, but it was the 
spirit of righteousness, of truth, and if life wasn't stronger than death, if 
God wasn't stronger than the devil, the men that went abroad and laid down 
their lives would have died in vain." 

Congratulating the young ladies of the Senior Class on their attainment 
of honors so far, Mr. Bryan enjoined them to bear in mind always that for 
four years they had been tied up with something real, something enduring. 

"What good will it do you," he asked, "in the depths of sorrow to know all 
the irregular French verbs?" adding, "And they are highly irregular! I am 
interested in this school because it educates the mind and the character." 

Concluding Exercises in the Chapel 

Processional Hymn, No. 396: "Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand" 

Scripture Lesson 

Benediction 

Creed 

Prayers 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 

Hymn No. 311: "Ancient of Days" 

Presentation of the Diplomas 

Address to Graduates 

Prayers and Benediction 

Recessional Hymn: "Jerusalem, High Tower" 

The Diplomas were presented by Bishop Cheshire, who then addressed the 
graduates with helpful lessons as to the meaning of the day to them, not 
only now, but throughout their lives, the keynote being suggested by the 
words, "Rejoice in the Lord alway and again I say, rejoice." 



THE COLLEGE HONORS OF 1919 



Trje Salutatory 



Marian Drane 

It is a very pleasant privilege that is mine today, to welcome you, 
on behalf of the class of 1919, to these the closing exercises of our 
Commencement. We are happy to have with us our good friend, 
Bishop Cheshire, the Trustees, our Rector, and the faculty, the 
school and our friends, especially the "Old Girls," whom we are 
so glad to have back with us today. To each and all we give a hearty 
welcome. 



THE CL0SS ESSAY 



Leonardo da Vinci: "His Life Was His Masterpiece" 



Helen Battle 

Let us look at the life of Leonardo da Vinci as at an artist in 
the execution of a masterpiece. As there are practically three 
stages in the painting of a picture, so there are three in the 
life of this remarkable man. They are his childhood, middle 
manhood, and later life. His childhood up until the time he left 
Florence for Milan was the sketching in of the outlines and the first 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 



laying in of the predominant colors of the masterpiece, his life. 
These are indefinite little things, yet telling in the final appearance 
of the whole. His move to Milan to be under the patronage of Duke 
Sforza and the favorite of the Milanese court is the second period. 
Here at the court Leonardo at last found a partial expression for 
all his mechanical and architectural projects, as well as an oppor- 
tunity to use freely his brush and canvas. With great strokes he 
was painting his deeds and life on the indestructible canvas of time, 
filling in the bare outlines made in his youth, giving his work charac- 
ter, color, and a vivid aliveness which is characteristic of his paint- 
ings. He was in the prime of life. Next would come the finishing 
touches, but it was not to be so. It was as though the artist had 
found, on reaching this point, that his conception was greater than 
mortal man could accomplish. So, after viewing his Herculean task 
and idly touching up a few minor details, he left it — a magnificent, 
stupendous attempt at the impossible. Thus was the latter part of 
Leonardo's life spent until he died at the little Manor of Clues, four 
hundred years ago this May, leaving to the world the unfinished 
masterpiece — his life. 

What was the inexpressible conception that was the subject of this 
masterpiece ? What was the driving motive of Leonardo's life ? They 
were one and the same, a passion for the perfect, an unending search 
for perfection which arose from a mind possessed of an insatiable 
intellectual curiosity. The aim of Leonardo's existence was to dis- 
cover things which neither himself nor others knew and to explain 
them satisfactorily. It was a distinctive tendency from childhood, 
developing and strengthening with other characteristics no less 
marked. 

The influences in his childhood were powerful factors in bringing 
out these qualities and characteristics. His early life was strange. 
He was born out of wedlock, in a little village called Vinci, from 
which he took his name. His mother was a woman in humble station, 
yet of gentle birth and moderately refined manners. His father was 
Sir Piero, an influential notary of Florence, and a man of tre- 
mendous vitality, mentally and physically. His son inherited these 
traits. Sir Piero did not allow Leonardo to remain long with his 



26 The St. Mary's Muse 



mother, but took the child with him to Florence where he grew up 
under the guidance of four successive step-mothers; therefore, one 
might say that he was practically motherless. His stepbrothers and 
sisters were so much younger than he that during the formative 
period of his life he was often alone and neglected. This childhood 
solitude accounts for much in his later life; his intimate knowledge 
of nature and natural phenomena, and his love of wild strange 
things such as storms, rugged mountains and peculiar animals. 

In his eighteenth year he had shown such promise in painting 
that Verrochio was chosen to be his master. Such a pupil as the 
sculptor had ! We hear of him as a headstrong youth of individual 
taste, reveling in rich color and never satisfied with the knowledge 
already gained but delving into unknown depths to find reasons, 
explanations, and causes. He disregarded teaching, finding hidden 
laws by experience, and working out a method for himself. He 
showed an insatiable spirit of inquiry in many fields, flinging him- 
self into each new subject with an ardor of delight and curiosity. 
In his search after truth and realism he advanced as a conquering 
hero, not as a bashful lover. He had apparently no desire to follow 
the ancient manner of painting and sculpturing; the antiques in 
the Medici gardens only attracted and influenced him so far as they 
awakened his passion for perfection. His mind was not occupied 
entirely with methods and manners of painting. Far from that! 
It swarmed with ideas on engineering, architecture, animal anatomy, 
and laws concerning mechanical forces. The projects were often 
of a daring which amazed his fellow citizens of Alberti and the 
surrounding villages, but were of such magnitude and intricacy 
that, with the limited opportunities of those days in Florence, they 
were unattainable. 

Few figures were more attractive than Leonardo during this period 
of all-capable and dazzling youth. There was nothing of darkness 
and somberness in his temper ; nothing of secrecy or littleness in his 
nature ; he was open, social, genial to all. At times he loved solitude, 
shutting himself away from men in an intellectual absorption, and 
forgetting the world. But we can imagine him coming out of his 
fascinating study of bats, lizards and snakes, and gathering about 



The St. Mary's Muse 27 



him a congenial company, jesting with them until they were in fits 
of laughter, in order to observe their burlesque expressions. We see 
him frequenting the society of men of science and learning, the 
mathematician, Benedetto Arithmetico, the physician and astrono- 
mer, Paolo Toscanelli ; outrivaling all the youths of the city by 
charm of recitation, by skill in music, and by feats of strength and 
horsemanship. Again, we find him stopping in the market place to 
buy birds that he might set them free and watch them rejoicing in 
their flight as they circled over his head in the deep blue of the 
Italian sky; or standing radiant in his rose-colored cloak and rich 
gold hair among the throng of young and old on the Piazzo, holding 
them spell-bound while he expatiated on the great projects which 
were teeming in his mind. 

Meanwhile, he had begun work on his own responsibility, but 
remained poor, diverted from work in art by his various schemes 
in other lines. His interest was much too broad to be centered for 
long on one phase of work. Among other things he began to work 
out the laws of light and shade. Thus we see Leonardo launched 
enthusiastically in many fields. But as Florence became more and 
more old-fashioned and its conventions began to stifle all originality 
and initiative, Leonardo decided to leave the city. He had begun his 
masterpiece on an enormous scale, in broad strokes and rich colors. 

At this time an invitation came to him to go to one of the most 
splendid courts in Europe — Milan. The reigning duke, Ludovico 
Sforza, was dreaming of making it a second Athens and a center of 
culture for Italy. Leonardo could fulfil his dreams in the artistic 
and mechanical way, so he gave him full rein for his imagination 
as a civil engineer, as a pageant master, as a sculptor, as a painter 
and as an architect. These Milanese years are among the most cul- 
tured and fertile of his life. He was superintending hydraulic works 
and continuing his various scientific investigations. Also during 
this time he did the famous equestrian stature of Francesco Sforza, 
painted the Virgin of the Rocks, and finished his greatest work in 
painting The Last Supper. 

From the beginning of his residence with the Duke, his mechanical 
ingenuity and apt allegorical insight, his courtly charm and eloquence 



28 The St. Mart's Mtjsb 

made him the guiding spirit of all court activities. We find him 
designing "bathing pavilions of unequaled beauty for the Duchess," 
designing the "mechanical and spectacular part of the Masque of 
Paradise," and all the while "filling his note books with the results 
of his studies in statics, dynamics, etc." In thinking and planning 
he drew models and wrote descriptions of many different machines, 
and developed manners and methods of work. These manuscripts 
are almost undecipherable, being written left hand back-handed from 
the right to the left. Is it any wonder that we have remained in 
ignorance of really how far Leonardo penetrated into the fields of 
science and mechanics ? We do know that he drew complete plans 
for an aeroplane and began to invent a submarine, but the thought 
of the diabolical work of the machine gave him a distaste for the 
idea and he never finished it. 

In science Leonardo was practically a pioneer working wholly for 
the future ; for the most part, alone. In art he was the perf ector and 
inventor. He early found the way to unite accuracy with freedom 
and fire, a correctness of expression with a vital movement and 
rhythm of line. He was the first painter to recognize the impor- 
tance of the play of light and shade. Earlier schools had subordinated 
this feature to color and outline, but Leonardo saw the distinct im- 
portance of contrast in producing desired effects and set to work to 
conquer the kingdom of chiaroscuro. His aim was to achieve this 
conquest and, at the same time, to carry the old Florentine excellence 
of lineal drawing and expression to a perfection of which other men 
had not dreamed. The result was marvelous in quality, though 
meager in quantity. 

Yet no imaginable strength of any single man would have sufficed 
to carry out a hundredth part of what Leonardo essayed. One reason 
for his tremendous energy and working ability was his entire con- 
fidence in himself. He writes to the Duke Sf orza from Florence : 

"In time of peace, I believe I can equal anyone in architecture, 
in constructing public and private buildings and in conducting water 
from one place to another. I can execute sculpture whether in 
marble, bronze, or terra cotta, and in painting I can do as much as 
any other, be he who he may be. Further, I could engage to execute 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 



the bronze horse in eternal n\emory of your father and the illustrious 
house of Sforza." This letter sounds conceited, but why should 
Leonardo not acknowledge his ability if he knew he could clo these 
things ? It is an example of his perfect frankness and self-confidence. 
The year 1500 ends this second period of Leonardo's life. Duke 
Sforza was captured by the French and Leonardo left the Milanese 
court. He was in Florence off and on for several years, but as young 
Michael Angelo had become prominent and the two could not pos- 
sibly get on together, Leonardo left Florence for good. Though the 
real work of his life was practically finished, his restless desire to 
solve new problems gave him no peace. After he left Florence he 
wandered from Rome, up through northern Italy, to France where 
the king, Francis I, gave him a palace and an income. Here in 
peace and quiet he spent the last three years of his life. He gave 
to the world, aside from his paintings, sculpturing, and scientific 
and mechanical investigations, a simple splendid example of what 
life can be. Filled with color, light and shadow, yet at the same 
time calm serenity and power, the life of Leonardo da Vinci very 
nearly reaches the artistic perfection which was his passion. So 
great was his aim and so broad his attempt that we are filled with 
admiration for this man who would labor all his life for the un- 
attainable. This is the masterpiece he left to us, a glorious, powerful 
life, full of drama and beauty, and colored by a unique personality. 



THE VALEDICTORY 



Elizabeth Kitchin 

This is the day to which we have looked forward for four years 
with so much pleasure and joy. The pleasure today is very real. 
We are happy to have known and won the friendship of so many 
lovely people here. We are happy to have had for our home for 
four years a place so beautiful and so imbued with the spirit of 
simplicity, sincerity, and sanctity. We are happiest of all that we 
have at last triumphed over all difficulties leading to graduation and 
are now about to become alumnae of what we think is the best school 



30 The St. Mary's Muse 

in the world. We thrill with joy when we realize that now it is our 
turn to go out into the world and serve, and it is with heartfelt 
gratitude that we turn to St. Mary's and thank her that we are in 
part fitted to do this. But our feeling is not entirely one of joy. 
Mingled in is sincere sadness at leaving the spot so endeared to us 
all. We sorrowfully say good-bye to our beloved rector, our esteemed 
lady principal, and all our dear teachers and school-mates. Our 
grief, however, is lightened by the hope that we will see each other 
often again and that we will return to our Alma Mater as old St. 
Mary's girls. I voice the sentiment of every girl in the Class of 1919, 
when I say, "May God bless St. Mary's and everybody connected 
with her !" 



CLflSS DAY EXERCISES 



Class Poem 

A song escapes our lips, 
By words left unexpressed, 
A song whose tone is mixed 
Alike with joy, distress — 
A song whose author is the heart 
Of those who would confess 
Thou art the truest friend 
That e'er a soul possessed, 
St. Mary's! 

A song escapes our lips — 
The parting day is here — 
A song whose very tone 
Expectancy doth hear, 
A song whose soul goes piercing 
Through the future with a prayer 
And leads us onward from thee 
Our truest friend and dear, 
St. Mary's! 

E. N. W. 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



The History of the Class of 1919 

We were a jolly group of girls, noisy and carefree, who met 
together in the Fall of 1915 to organize our Freshman Class, which 
should go out from St. Mary's as the class of 1919. It was a large 
group, there being about sixty of us then, and after transacting our 
business with as little squabbling and in as wise a manner as could 
be expected from such a large number of Freshies, we adjourned, 
a well organized class, having as our adviser Miss Sutton, Presi- 
dent, Jo Meyers, and colors, scarlet and gray. In that first year, we 
had all the experiences that could be expected from so large a class. 
Some of us kept Miss Thomas, our Lady Principal, busy reading out 
reports, and giving us "black marks," while others, from the very 
beginning, started to work in an earnest resolve to make the most 
of their school career. When the Juniors entertained us, we felt 
very proud and, at first, awed at the attention from such high and 
mighty people. But we enjoyed the party and discovered that 
Juniors and even Seniors are really like the rest of us, and when 
our turn came to entertain them, we felt on quite familiar terms 
with them, some of our number even being so bold as to claim one 
of the Juniors for her "crush !" 

When we returned in 1916, we felt almost as if we were coming 
back home. We felt that we belonged to St. Mary's, and that she 
was as glad to have us back as we were glad to be here. Our class 
suffered a great decrease in number, there being only fifteen left 
from the sixty. Some of our fellow members of the class of the 
year before had passed us by and had become Juniors, while others 
had failed to return. But we weren't daunted, and settled down to 
work to keep up the good name we had established the year before. 
Estelle Kavenel was made our President that year, and with the 
prospect of having several new girls working and joining our ranks 
later, we felt sure that everything was bidding fair for a prosperous 
Junior year. The hospitality extended us in the fall by the Seniors 
was returned by us after Christmas. 

And then vacation and fall again, and we were Juniors ! We felt 
very proud of our privileges that accompanied the title, and not a 



32 The St. Mary's Muse 

single week passed that we did not use our one permission to go 
shopping in the afternoon ! Nina Burke was chosen to be our Presi- 
dent, and early in October we entertained our sister class, the Fresh- 
men, by giving a baby party in the parlor, when all of the Freshies 
dressed as little girls and boys and we, the Juniors, as nurses. We 
had a fine time, and after Christmas we enjoyed even more the dance 
given us by the Freshmen. But the biggest feature of the whole 
year, to us at any rate, and Bonie can prove (that as a class, we're 
none too humble-minded ! ) was the Junior-Senior Banquet. Although 
it was a war year and our time was fully occupied with making 
bandages and knitting for the Ked Cross and our other war activi- 
ties, we realized that the Seniors would never be Seniors here again, 
and we decided to give them the banquet just the same. So we 
planned to have an out-door party, behind the Audtiorium. The 
lanterns were strung, the table set, and everything was prepared 
when a thunder storm came up, so that part of our plans was upset, 
and it was a great disappointment to us, but we moved everything 
inside the Auditorium, and as those Seniors are not here, I'll say 
for them that it was a fine party and everybody enjoyed it thor- 
oughly. It was not much later that we once again honored the 
Seniors, when at the end of May we gathered daisies for the daisy 
chain. Will we ever forget the blisters on our hands, or getting up 
before day on Monday morning to make it ? I don't believe we will. 
But we didn't mind the work, because we knew it was the last thing 
that we could do for our good friends whose mantles were to fall 
upon our shoulders the next day. 

Back again, and Seniors ! This was mighty hard to realize when 
we got back last fall, but neither did we wish to realize it, for it 
meant our last year at St. Mary's. We felt that a great responsibility 
was upon our shoulders because we were here to greet both our new 
Lady Principal and our new Eector. But with Mildred Kirtland 
at our head, we made up our minds to do everything in our power 
to help, and make things easier for them. 

Our Freshman year might be remembered by the "Shakesperian 
Festival" ; our Sophomore year by the celebration in honor of the 
seventy-fifth anniversary of the School and the fiftieth anniversary 



The St. Maky's Muse 33 



of Miss Katie; our Junior year as being the War Year; but this 
year we have no such distinctive mark to make us thus remembered. 
But we feel that the whole year has been a successful one, and we 
congratulate ourselves upon the success of the entertainments which 
we have helped to get up, during this year, for all say that they 
have been a credit to our class. We do hope that we shall be remem- 
bered, not as the dread collectors of Muse dues, but the Class of 
1919, honoring our Alma Mater, venerable for long and respected 
life and so endeared to each one of us here today that the thought 
uppermost in our minds is that we may, in deeds done and in loyal 
devotion, be worthy of our title of graduates of St. Mary's. 

M. Dkane. 



The Class Prophecy 



Scene: a graveyard 

From out the grave at this our hour we rise, 
The spirits of that famous class, Nineteen. 
As I the prophet was, I ope my eyes 
The first, on stones, the graves of all the rest. 
For once I'll say exactly what I know! 
Their fate, their fortunes, I will truly show. 

When walking in the catacombs one day 

In Rome (a monk's garb hid my former self), 

I heard a woman's voice in Latin say 

That she a learned doctor was from Yale. 

A word too large for her aroused a sneeze. 

I turned and saw, it was — our own Louise! 

Now Dome's death was saddest of the sad! 
As matron in an Orphan's Home she served. 
She died of overwork, before she had 
Recovered quite from seeing Nina Burke 
Who cut her hair off short and straightened it. 
She, in Bohemia, made quite a hit. 

Two celebrated lawyers, Kirt and Bert, 
Astonished all this country wide and far. 
Imagine Bertie changed to such a flirt 
That she could wink at Judge and Juror both, 
And Mildred moving every one that heard 
The powerful passion of her spoken word. 



34 The St. Mary's Muse 



In North Dakota Josephine became 

A celebrated horticulturist. 

M. Fallon too became a farmer dame. 

Their seeds were famed because they always grew. 

They crossed a daisy with an ivy vine 

And so produced of plants the newest line! 

Beneath that stone lies Waddy Nash "Waddell. 

'Twas she became a belle in gay New York. 

Of all she did there I could truly tell, 

As I was in the Secret Service then, 

But it would take all night to tell her tale, 

Her catching of the quite elusive male! 

E. Kitchin really was the only one 

Who showed her sense and took her chance when young. 

A bakery, where girls might buy a bun, 

She opened gayly in St. Mary's Grove. 

Her name was made, her time of trial o'er! 

For men and money both flocked to her door. 

We always knew that Mary loved a oat, 

A fireside and a fragrant cup of tea — 

We never thought that she could e'er be fat 

And, with H. Battle, keep a Spinster's Hall. 

"To suitors, pay the very slightest heed." 

This was the rule to which they both agreed. 

M. Drane, although when she was off at school 
Ne'er flighty grew, was dignified at times, 
In later life she crawled with oil and tool 
Beneath the body of a Curtis plane, 
Then swiftly mounted daringly in air — 
St. Mary's girls have seen her at the Fair. 

The hour grows late. My time of speech is o'er. 

The other spirits rising glare at me. 

I'll silent grow and speak the truth no more, 

Else they might mob me for my truthful tale. 

I flee before the venom of their spite. 

Queer things one hears from spirits late at night! 



— E. B. Lay. 



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Mary's School library 



&t jfWarp's JWuse 

fcaleigl), & C. 



®fjanfce(gftittts Jlunrfier 

jSobcmber 
1919 



The St. Mary's Muse 

THANKSGIVING NUMBER 



Vol. XXV November, 1919 No. 2 






LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

edited by 
The Sigma Lambda Literary Society 



editors 
Lucy London Anderson Mary Moffitt 



Thanksgiving 

Crichton Thorne, '23 

Long years ago in forest shade a pilgrim maid 
Kneeled all alone, far from the feast, 
With lifted hands and prayed: 

"O God, the sender of all good, 

We thank Thee for Thy gift of food!" 

Years later in cathedral shade a thankful maid 
Kneeled all alone, far from earth's call, 
With lifted hands and prayed: 

"O God, who makest wars to cease, 
We thank Thee for Thy gift of peace!" 



Two Thanksgiving Days 

Catharine M. Miller, '20 

A cold, drizzling rain gave additional grayness to the already dull 
November day. The streets were deserted except for an occasional 
tmrrying figure garbed in raincoats and overshoes. Streams of water 
splashed noisily from the overfull gutters to the sidewalk. A wet, 
jray kitten crouched helpless and hopeless on some steps leading to 
a second-story establishment. 

Margaret Marshall walked resolutely up the street. The wind 
tugged at her umbrella but she only made an attempt at struggling. 
The cold drizzle mingled with the scalding tears which streamed 
iown her cheeks. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



"He has gone," she said half aloud. Then she remembered her 
promise to be a brave little wife, and forced a smile to come. But 
the other thought was too absorbing, and the smile gradually faded. 
Her captain husband had sailed and she was alone. 

"He has gone," she repeated to herself over and over. 

She ran up the steps of her boarding house and paused, startled 
at the noise coming from the big dining-room. "Why, what is the 
matter?" she said. "Oh! Thanksgiving — Thanksgiving Day," she 
groaned, and crept noiselessly to her room. 

As the great ship moved out of the harbor, bearing its load of 
thousands of soldiers and officers, Robert Marshall thought of Mar- 
garet and smiled. His Margaret — what a faithful, helpful little 
wife she had been! He hated to go, yet there was no fear in 
his heart. He had her love, and somehow it gave him strength to 
go on. 

The sea voyage was interesting and dangerous; but without any 
real adventures the ship sailed into the great English port. Then 
came the trip across the channel ; and the training camp in Southern 
France. Robert Marshall worked untiringly with his men. They 
loved him, and under every circumstance they trusted his judgment 
without questioning. 

Then came the summons for the regiment to go to the front. The 
captain and his men made ready with feverish eagerness. Every 
man was quivering with the tenseness of the moment. There was 
excitement, yet calm prevailed. The men filed slowly through the 
underground passage to the section of the trench they were to hold. 
Struggling back and forth in the mud, Robert Marshall placed his 
men. Then the Allied guns began their roar. Shells exploded 
everywhere. The German guns thundered back an indignant retort. 
Hour after hour the struggle went on till it seemed that the earth 
must burst with the shells. It was almost time for the attack. 
Pistol in hand, Robert Marshall stood with two of his sergeants issu- 
ing final orders. A sudden explosion and one section of the trench 
was ruined. Half buried in mud and ruins lay Robert Marshall, his 
right arm broken ; his right hand shot away. Beside him sprawled 
his two former companions, dead, shot by the exploding pistol in 
Robert's hand. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Pitying figures bent over and disentangled the three. 

"Poor fellows," said some one. "Killed by American bullets — 
tough luck." 

The words burnt themselves into Robert's half consciousness, and 
all through the painful journey to the dressing station and through 
the agony following the amputation the sense of blood guiltiness 
obsessed him, and he longed to die. 

In the hospital, however, his splendid manhood reasserted itself 
and he gradually, reluctantly, became stronger. But always was 
there present with him that horrible scene. His men — his men dead 
at his hands. 

Then he received orders to report in Washington for an honorable 
discharge, and he left France. When he received his discharge he 
started north. Margaret could never forgive him; he could not face 
her and tell her the horrible truth. He would go on — to the wilder- 
ness even — yes, he would go to Canada. 

Margaret kept quietly at her work. Every day she rolled band- 
ages and knitted — filling every stitch with love for her own and all 
soldier boys. Then one day her brother, Jackson Phillips, came home 
from France with the news that Robert had left there about two 
months ago. Startled and confused, Margaret went to Washington. 

After a long search and tireless questioning one clerk told her 
that he had opened a letter from her husband, requesting that his 
mail be sent to Little Pine, Canada. 

With despair and hopelessness in her heart she started forth. 
Little Pine in northern Canada seemed very, very far away, but she 
remained firm. Hour after hour she plunged forward still deeper 
into the vast wilderness of the northern Rockies. Then one after- 
noon at a tiny little snow-covered station the fast express train 
paused and Margaret found herself alone. In utter helplessness 
she walked slowly into the station where she hoped to find some little 
warmth and cheer, for it was briskly cold. She opened the door and 
saw a cheerful round-faced man lazily sitting in front of the tiny 
little stove. 

"Walk in, stranger," he said brightly. "Pretty good wither 
today." 



The St. Mary's Muse 



"Yes," said Margaret and hesitated. "Can you tell me — has a 
soldier — an American soldier come recently ?" 

"Why, sure, a captain," said the little station master. " 'Long 
two months back one came and settled up yonder in the old cabin on 
the hill." 

"Was his name Marshall ?" cried Margaret eagerly : "Robert 
Marshall?" 

"Well, see here, miss, I don't recollect exactly, but I'll take you 
up to the cabin. Here, take these snowshoes." 

They started bravely out, making slow progress, as Margaret 
was awkward with her snowshoes. Finally, they reached the cabin 
and called out. No one answered, so they entered. 

"My picture !" gasped Margaret. "It's his cabin. I have found 
it; but where is he?" 

"Oh! probably fetching some firewood. You stay here. Ill 
go back." 

Margaret thanked him from her heart for his kindness. Alone, 
she moved confusedly hither and thither about the room, trying to 
nurse the tiny fire on the hearth. At last she heard footsteps. 
Her heart leaped joyfully and she sprang behind the door. A tall 
man walked in rapidly, threw his armful of wood to the floor, and 
looked up. 

"Margaret !" he cried. 

"Robert, O why did you come here ?" asked Margaret. 

"Margaret, if you knew, could you ever forgive me ?" 

"But I do know," Margaret smiled through her tears. "My poor 
boy to suffer like that alone ! Why couldn't you trust me ?" 

"But I do now, my little precious wife." 

Back in the States small boys pulled the last shred of meat from 
the drumstick, and housewives cut fearfully into the plum pudding, 
hoping it was done. But in the tiny cabin at Little Pine two people 
were holding a real Thanksgiving Day without any turkey — just 
love. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Her TbanKsgiviog Message 

Florida Kent, '22 

Was this indeed Thanksgiving ? This cold, rainy day which 
made one feel that his last friend had deserted him. And was this 
the day to which every member of the little village of Jonesville 
had been looking forward? No, not every member, for in her 
little bungalow on the east side of Jonesville, Margaret Carson, the 
young widow of the late Lieutenant James C. Carson, was far too 
sad to look forward to anything so trivial as the arrival of a circus in 
a little "two by four" town. 

Several weeks before, the horrible news that Lieutenant Carson 
had been reported among the missing had been received in Jones- 
ville. It was hard for Margaret Carson to realize that she and her 
five-year-old son were left alone with her old Mammy. During 
the long months while James Carson was "over there" she had 
always cheerfully thought of the time when he would come back to 
her and "Jimmy, Jr." But now all such hopes were shattered and 
she looked forward into a blank nothingness. 

Thus it was when this particular cold and rainy Thanksgiving 
dawned. Margaret scarcely realized that it was Thanksgiving 
until Jimmy, almost in tears, ran and threw his arms around her. 

"Mother, aren't I going to the circus ? I told Mary I was and 
she said I wasn't." 

Then it was that Margaret realized that she had much to be thank- 
ful for in this little son. 

"O Jimmy, run and get Mammy to brush your hair. We have 
only ten more minutes before church." 

Margaret brushed viciously at her curly hair to make it stay 
down, and Jimmy patiently held up the pants of his little Oliver 
Twist suit and struggled with the buttons. 

"But Mammy's busy with that big old turkey what Mr. Jones 
sent." 



6 The St. Mary's Muse 



The little widow, holding her son's hand, walked rather hurriedly 
down the street which led to the church. As she walked into it, 
warm after the rain outside, she could see almost every mouth sym- 
pathetically form into "the war-widow"; and she realized that she 
was the center of attraction. When the benediction was pronounced 
and the last hymn sung, the church was quickly emptied, for there 
was no time for gossiping today. Every one was going directly 
from church to the circus grounds, and a lot of people who had 
found it too wet to go church, were now on their way to the circus. 

"But mother, what you going that way for ? This is the way to 
the circus. Don't you see the tents ?" 

Jimmy was very much excited at the idea of the big tents, and 
more so when he heard a roar from one of the lions. 

"What must I do?" thought Margaret. "Surely it is not right 
to instill in so young a child the realization of his loss. No, he 
must go to the circus just as though nothing had happened. And 
I must take him." 

They entered the main tent and, watched by every one, they sat 
down; Jimmy greatly interested in the clowns, tight-rope walkers, 
etc., and his mother feigning interest. 

"And her husband hasn't been dead a month, and there she sits 
laughing at that silly clown. Why, my Walter was dead four years 
before I went to a place, outside of a church." 

The widow of the aforesaid Walter looked askance at Margaret 
Carson and slowly shook her head as though she thought that Margaret 
was bound straight for the lower regions. 

After the big show Margaret took Jimmy around to look at the 
animals all over again, and so almost every one had gone when she 
started back to her little bungalow. The rain had stopped and the 
sun had come out, and Margaret thought what a vast change the sun 
made in one's feelings. When they came within a block of their 
little home Jimmy noticed several horses tied in front of the gate. 

"Why mother, we's got company." Just then Mammy came run- 
ning out to the gate and handed Margaret a slip of paper on which, 
if we could have looked over her shoulder, we would have read as 
she did: 



The St. Mary's Muse 



"Lieutenant James C. Carson falsely reported dead. Found 
passed. However, not so seriously but that he will recover with 
proper attention. Has sailed for New York." 

"Well, I tink yo oughta celebrate dat good news wid a sho' nun" 
Tanksgivin' dinna. All de turkey, an' jelly, an' silly-bulb, an' 
3akes, an' everyting is aw ready. So hurry up now, bof of you, 
for de gran' celebration — " 

With this, Mammy bustled them into the little bungalow. 



The Great Tharjl^sgiving 

Rebecca Cole, '23 

"From battle, murder, and sudden death, good Lord, deliver us," 
the old padre muttered as he stumbled down the shell-torn road lead- 
ing to his little village, which he had been forced to leave almost 
two years ago by the oncoming of the German horde. The Huns 
lad evacuated the village about two months ago — after strong per- 
suasion from the American troops — and Father Da Pre had been 
unable to secure passports until now. 

As he stumbled along, shivering a bit in the chill November air, 
the old priest's mind wandered back over those four awful years of 
bloodshed and carnage. He had seen his young men, Jacques, Phil- 
ipe, Paul, and the others, kiss their weeping mothers and sweet- 
hearts good-bye and march valiantly away, promising to return in 
a few weeks when they should have routed completely those insolent 
Germans. He had seen those same mothers and sweethearts go 
bravely about the men's work, planting the crops in the spring and 
gathering them in at the harvest, while each day the German bar- 
barians crept closer and closer to the little village. Step by step 
they were forcing the French and English back. Then, after two 
[years of heated struggle back and forth across the once beautiful 
fields of France, the time came for the villagers to leave their loved 
homes. Father Da Pre had helped those who were going to pack 
as many of their simple belongings as they could well carry, and 
started them off on their weary search for another home. But 



The St. Mart's Muse 



some would not leave. They had come to him in an anxious bodj 
and asked him, tremblingly, "Ah, Father, do you think they woulc 
hurt us if we stayed quietly at home and offered them no harm' 
We cannot leave our homes for which we have worked so hard !'" 
And Father Da Pre, in all the simplicity of his own pure heart 
forgot that this was a horde of barbarians who had no sense o] 
chivalrous treatment of women and children. "Ah," he thought 
"how little I knew them!" and he thought of that horrible nightmare 
when the Germans had occupied the little village. They had sho 1 
down all of the old men except himself, and why they had spared 
him had always been a mystery. They had maltreated and abusee 
the women and children, and had even sent some of the young girl; 
to work in their factories. And then, as a final catastrophe, the] 
had burned down most of the houses, after looting them of the feu 
valuables they contained, and driven the villagers before them ai 
they pushed on after the retreating allied forces. He rememberec 
as well as if it had been graven on his heart that long march througl 
the mutilated and devastated fields, shivering with cold, weak fron 
hunger, stopping every now and then to help some poor woman wit! 
her bundles or to shrive some dying soldier who had dropped by th< 
wayside. Then, those two years of anxious waiting in Paris ; goin^ 
about his daily duty of helping the poor, with the dread though 
of defeat always in his mind. Well he remembered the day whei 
the American troops had come. The crowds had gone out to wel 
come and cheer them, forgetting for the moment that they ha<; 
come three years late. And again hope had been born in him. 

And now, after the glorious victories of the American troops, thu 
Germans had been forced to evacuate his loved village, and he wa)i 
going home. But he was not happy. Would the war never end, h< 
thought ? Must this awful sacrifice of human lives go on forever 

Suddenly he heard the ringing of his old chapel bell. For wha 
was it ringing \ It did not ring in the blatant, military way it hac 
rung when the young men were called to arms, not in the slow 
warning peal with which it had rung at the approach of the Ger 
mans. But it rang as clearly, loudly, jubilantly, as though then 
had never been a war, or ever would be one. He quickened hii 



The St. Mary's Muse 



step and soon arrived at the village and, as one in a dream, he saw 
some of his old parishioners in the market place, waving flags and 
shouting joyfully. Could it be that they had gotten there before 
him, or was this all a dream, an aftermath of the four years' night- 
mare? There were Jacques and Philipe, both crippled, but alive, 
and what were they talking about that made them so happy ? He 
felt old and out of things. Then the villagers; saw him and ran to 
him excitedly. They all crowded around and began telling him 
some good news, but all talking together so that he could not clearly 
make out what they were trying to say. At length he made out the 
words "armistice," "peace," "vive la France," and it suddenly 
dawned on him that they were trying to tell him that the war was 
practically over, and that the armistice had been signed. He tot- 
tered for a moment, but soon recovered himself and led his excited 
and joyful villagers to the ravaged little chapel. And there, in that 
ruined little village on that glorious day of November 11, 1918 ; 
while the word was ringing around the world, from London to Paris, 
from Paris to Rome, from Eome to Moscow, from Moscow to Pekin, 
and from Pekin to Washington; while bells were ringing all over 
the world and guns were fired from one corner of the globe to the 
other, the good old village priest knelt down amid the ruins of his 
little chapel with the joyful peasants and gave thanks for the great- 
est Thanksgiving Day the world had ever known, on which all the 
civilized countries in the world gave thanks for peace after the 
greatest of world wars. 

"Thanks be unto Thee, O God, for this, Thy bountiful mercy," 
the old priest murmured. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price Two Dollars 

Single Copies Twenty-five Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1919-20 
Mary T. Yellott, '20, Editor-in-Chief 
Catherine Miller, '20 Catharine Boyd, '20 

Crichton Thorne, '23 Mabel Norfleet, '23 

Frances Venable, '22 Louise Powell, '22 

Jane Ruffin, '20, Business Manager 
Ernest Cruikshank, Faculty Director 



EDITORIAL 

The second issue of the monthly Muse comes out as the Thanks- 
giving Number, and is edited by the Sigma Lambda Literary 
Society. 

Anything having to do this year with Thanksgiving is of especial 
interest to us all, for never before, with the exception, perhaps, of 
last year, has it been such a joyful occasion. How well we remem- 
ber, as we entered the dining-room last Thanksgiving Day, the great 
sign that met our eyes — "Thank God for the Unspeakable Gift of 
Peace." This year we have not only to give thanks for the gift of 
peace, but for the safe return of so many of the boys who were then 
still "over there." How many homes are this year brightened by 
the presence of those soldier boys who, a year ago, were eating Sal- 
vation Army doughnuts, and well may many a gray old Dad's voice 
break in the middle of the blessing, preparatory to carving the tur- 
key! Well indeed may "earth repeat the loud amen" to the words 
of the psalmist: "O give thanks unto the Lord, for He is gracious: 
and His mercy endureth forever." 



The St. Mary's Muse 11 



Dr. Aldert Smedes 

Written by Catharine Melleb fob Founders' Day 

To Aldert Smedes we owe the beginning of St. Mary's. At the 
equest of Bishop Ives, Dr. Smedes undertook the founding of a 
outhern school for girls in May, 1842. 

Bishop Chesire, in his sermon at the semi-centennial celebration of 
he founding of St. Mary's, said : "St. Mary's in its foundation and 
Lrst work was but the expression of its founder, Dr. Aldert Smedes." 

Our School was erected on a foundation of indestructible character, 
or it sprang from the devotion, strength and faith of its founder. 
Tor thirty-five years he labored with untiring zeal as the pastor and 
piritual father of "his girls." He lived the Christian life and this 
ife has quickened many others. He taught his classes with the 
nthusiasm of his noble calling. 

In the management of his School, Dr. Smedes was kind, wise, 
enerous, just, acknowledging merit, pitying weakness, yet demand- 
ng faithfulness in teachers and pupils. He realized fully that the 
haracter of the teacher developed the personality of the pupils. He 
lever forgot that we, ourselves, must be true, self-controlled, and 
loble if we would make our pupils so. 

Dr. Smedes saw his ideal for St. Mary's when he first gave it its 
lame, hoping that the life of the blessed Virgin Mary might inspire 
;irls with the ideal of noble womanhood. 

Through all the trying days of the war, Dr. Smedes still labored 
aithfully, and gave generously of his means to keep up the School. 
3e had unusual executive and financial ability, and the School was 

material success. He loved his work, his girls, and the St. Mary's 
ie had made. It was the expression of his life. The ideals of our 
School are the result of his personality and the life he spent in the 
ervice of others. 

Founders Day, 1919, sees the old Main Building where Dr. 
Smedes started his work greatly improved and beautified, and called 
>medes Hall in memory of the founder. It is well that the center of 
he School Dr. Smedes loved should bear his name, and as today we 
ee St. Marv's as the beautiful School we love, we think of Dr. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 

Smedes, the man who tried and succeeded, and say with thankfV 

hearts : 

"For all the good his faithful life hath wrought 
We thank God always for the blessed dead, 
And for the noble works that follow him." 



How the Signing of the Armistice Was Celebrated at St. Mary's 

Written by Jane Toy for Armistice Day 

It was in the wee sma' hours of a cold November morning. Out 1 
side the stars were shining, and all was quiet; inside it was stil 
quieter, and every one of the hundred and seventy-five St. Mary' 
girls was sound asleep, snuggling down cozily and dreaming of — well' 
maybe some were dreaming of home and days which were not meat< 
less and wheatless, and others of the far-off days when "He" woul<< 
be back from Over There. 

Suddenly a shrill, piercing noise breaks in upon the dreamers. Al 1 
through the buildings the awakened girls sit up in bed and listen 
It grows louder, and louder. Factory whistles, bells, automobile 
horns join in. What can it all be ? Is there a fire ? Some brav<< 
girls run to the windows, but there is no red glow against the sky 
And still the clamor grows louder; automobiles are passing out oi^ 
Hillsboro Street, people too, and then come the newsboys, crying 
through the darkness, "Extra! Extra!" We can hear them as thej 
come nearer. One is in the Grove, and we listen breathlessly foil 
his voice. "Extra ! Extra !" he shouts. "The war am over now foi 
sho'. We done woke up Peace !" Peace ! Can it be true ? Cai 
the war be over ? We are stunned and dazed ; we have almost fori 
gotten how we felt before the war; we cannot realize that the boyij 
are no longer fighting, that they are safe ! 

But we haven't time to stop to realize. The lights in the halls ar< 
on, and every one is dressing, throwing on sweaters and coats ano! 
rushing out. Already there are some girls in the Grove, running 1 
around and yelling. There! That last shoestring pops, but w< 
haven't time to worry about a little thing like that. We tuck it ii 
somehow, and rush out to the Grove. What a strange sight meeti 



The St. Mary's Muse 13 



ur ejes! There in front of Main Building (it was Main Building 
hen) is a crowd of girls, but my ! can they be the same girls we 
anced with in the parlor last night— these girls with hair screwed 
ack in plaits or tight knots, and sweaters wrapped around them? 
Jut they are the same — maybe it is the glow on their faces, the awed 
bok in their eyes that has changed them. Some eyes are shining 
ritk a suspicious brightness, and over there a girl is crying even as 
le smiles. ]STo wonder, for her brother is in a German prison camp, 
nd now she knows that he is safe. 

But look ! Some one has started a snake dance out in the Grove. 
t is growing light ; the stars are fading, and there in the gray light 
f the dawn the long string of girls with joined hands are dancing 
round. We all join in the mad dance. Everybody is yelling and 
sating on dust pans. Finally we stop quite breathless and still 
ither dazed. We find that our arms are around some girl's neck — 
fe are hugging each other madly, and when we disentangle our- 
)lves we don't even know each other's names ! But what does that 
Latter ? The same great joy is making both of our hearts beat as 

they would burst. We squeeze each other's hands and say some- 
>ing quite senseless about "Jack" or "Bill" and "Can the War be 
rer?" 

But see ! Over in the East there is a rosy glow, and in a moment 
e see the rim of the sun peeping through the trees. "Keevie" has 
nought out the flag, and we find ourselves gathered around the Hag- 
gle. We are quite still now, and as we watch the Stars and Stripes 
ise against the pale sky a great solemnity comes over us — every hand 
pes up to salute. Some one starts the Star-Spangled Banner, 
:id how we sing! A hundred and seventy-five joyous voices ring 
it through the morning air with the familiar words, but somehow 
ey seem different now. Something has made them sacred, and our 
;arts throb with joy and thankfulness and peace as we sing them. 

And now we are silent again. The flag is floating above our 
jads and the sun is beaming through the trees. In the daylight 
3 look at each other's ridiculous costumes and smile — we do look 
nny, and we realize that we must go back and get ready for 
eakfast. 



14 The St. Mart's Muse 



The crowd disperses. Some go into the parlor to dance. There 
The familiar sound of the breakfast bell rings out, and we tur 
towards the dining-room feeling as if it were lunch, not breakfas' 
that we are going to, we've been up so long. But what a breakf sa 
it is ! After the blessing we all clap wildly, and then from over s 
the day pupils' table comes a "Rah, rah — rah, rah, rah!" for Peac< 
Wilson, Pershing, Eoch, the Boys, etc. The Seniors are there, an 
all through the meal they keep yelling and singing so that even i 
we wanted to we couldn't eat anything. But nobody is hungry- 
what does food matter at a time like this ? Eyes are shining, hear^ 
are singing, and PEP is bubbling over, for PEACE has come ! 



SCHOOL NEWS 

October 4 — The Junior Auxiliary Reception 

On Saturday evening, October 4th, the Junior Auxiliary Com 
cil gave a delightful reception to the new and old members of tl 
Auxiliary, comprising the entire school. After the addresses c 
welcome, delivered by Miss Katie and Katherine Batts, the chai: 
man of the Junior Auxiliary, interesting talks were made by severs 
members of the Council. First, Rainsford Glass spoke on tl 
special Lenten work of the Auxiliary, recalling to our mind's ey 
the picture of the six little "orphans," dressed by the various Cha] 
ters, who took dinner with us last Easter Sunday. Catherine Boy 
then told about the Bible Woman in China and the scholarships i 
St. Mary's Hall, Shanghai, and in the Thompson Orphanage whic 
are maintained by our Junior Auxiliary. Dorothy Kirtland spol 
on the Chapter entertainments, events of special interest during tl 
latter half of the year, and Catharine Miller made a splendid tal 
about Blue Ridge. When the talks were over, the Council membe] 
withdrew for a few minutes, and on their return were hailed wit 
delight, for some carried waiters laden with generous saucers c 
chocolate ice cream, and others, heaping plates of ISTabiscoes. Wit 
the refreshments, all formality disappeared and dancing was tl 






The St. Maby's Muse 15 



order of the day until a warning flash of the lights sent the dancers 
scampering to bed. C. B. 

October 7 — The Opening Sigma Lambda Meeting 

The second inter-society meeting, this time under the direction of 
the Sigma Lambda Literary Society, was held in the parlor on 
Tuesday evening, October 7th. The faculty, new students, and 
members of the E. A. P. Literary Society were invited, and there 
was a good attendance. Lucy London Anderson, the President, 
opened the meeting, and then an interesting program was presented, 
consisting of representations of the little everyday happenings that 
go to make up the school life at St. Mary's. 

"First and Last" was read by Margaret Pou ; "Monday Morning," 
by Catharine Miller, and "Saturday Night," by Frances Venable. 
"To Find Mr. Cruikshank," sung by Eainsford Glass, Mary Hoke, 
Margaret Eawlings, and Frances Venable, accompanied by Miss 
Eoberts, proved very amusing to every one, especially the new girls 
who had never heard it before. Betty Bonner read Crichton 
Thome's attractive little poem, "Dressing for Jim," and the last 
number was a very characteristic sketch, "Getting the Mail," which 
was well read by Martha Best. The program was closed by singing 
"Alma Mater." 

The meeting was a decided success, and promised well for the 
Sigma Lambda Society in the contest for the year. C. M. M. 



October 11 — The Japanese Tea 

The basement of East Wing was the scene of a very pretty party 
given by the Muse Club on Saturday evening, October 11th. The 
Muse Koom and surrounding halls were transformed into a veritable 
Japanese fairyland, with the conventional lanterns hung from the 
ceiling casting a strange glow over the familiar spot. Very effective 
were the chains of wistaria and the yellow chrysanthemums with 
which the room was artistically decorated. The little tea tables 
scattered around the sides of the room and in the hall were attended 



16 The St. Mary's Muse 

by dainty Japanese maidens, who might indeed have glided out of 
far Japan instead of merely out of the Latin room opposite. They 
served, however, really and truly American refreshments of chicken 
salad, sandwiches, olives, crackers, tea and ice cream. It was a case 
of "come early and avoid the rush" : indeed the late comers were 
too often greeted with the familiar "They ain't no mo'." While 
enjoying the refreshments, several musical numbers were delight- 
fully rendered by favorite St. Mary's musicians: Miss Gesner and 
Estelle Avent, soloists; Edith Miller, violinist; JSJancy Lay and 
Marietta Gareissen, pianists. As a grand finale Carolina Kirby- 
Smith did a Spanish dance, as only Carolina can. 

The Tea was a great success from every point of view, and reflects 
much credit on the Muse Club as a whole, and especially on the 
Chairman, Eleanor Sublett, and her able assistants, Jane Kuffin and 
Mary Moffitt of the Refreshment Committee, and Dorothy Kirtland, 
chairman of the Serving Committee. M. IT. 

October 14 — Miss Knox's Recital 

During the past month there have been two events of musical 
interest to which the St. Mary's girls were allowed to go — the violin 
recital given by Miss Emilie Rose Knox on October 14th, and the 
May Peterson concert on October 22d, the evening of the special St. 
Mary's Fair Day, which explains our very small attendance at the 
concert. There was, however, quite a party of St. Mary's girls at 
Miss Knox's recital, and this for several reasons. We are proud to 
claim her as an old St. Mary's girl herself, and there were many of 
us who were therefore anxious to hear "Emilie Rose" play. The 
rest were equally desirous of hearing "Miss Knox," of whose skill 
as a violinist they had heard. Moreover, not only is her father the 
School physician, but her accompanist was Miss Sue Kyle South- 
wick, our very popular music teacher. Thus it was an eager crowd 
of laughing, talking girls who took their seats some time before the 
appointed hour, amused themselves comparing the stage with our 
own Auditorium when decorated for the spring recitals, and impa- 
tiently awaited the appearance of Miss Knox. 



The St. Mary's Muse 17 



We were not disappointed in our expectations. From the first 
note of the violin, silence settled upon the audience, broken only by 
the prolonged applause and the buzz of approving conversation at 
the end of each selection. We saw for ourselves how true were the 
newspaper comments on her playing, which we had read— that she 
had mastered the difficulties of technique, and played with fire and 
yet with perfect ease. A long-drawn sigh of bliss arose when, to- 
wards the close of the program, Miss Knox played the "Meditation 
from Thais," a favorite of our School violinist, Edith Miller. On 
the whole, it was a most enjoyable evening, and we returned to school 
with increased pride and pleasure in being able to say, "Oh, yes 
Emilie Eose Knox. She's an old St. Mary's girl, you know!" 

October 18— The Bloomer Party 

The annual Bloomer Party has the "rep." of being one of the 
very nicest parties of the whole year, and this time it was no excep- 
tion to the rule. The Gym. was conspicuously decorated with the 
Mu Championship Banners for the past two years, one on each 
side of the door, and between stood the punch table. If the Sigmas 
were less delighted with part of this decoration than were the Mus, 
their enthusiasm for the rest of it was not dampened thereby. Nor 
was their pride seriously wounded by the fact that, after all, due to 
the increasing lateness of the hour and the correspondingly increas- 
ing stubbornness of the Mus, they were obliged to "go first." They 
marched in to the time of a peppy new yell, followed by the Mus, 
who, chanting their customary "um-ah-ah," circled around them. 
From the very first every one seemed brimful of pep and enthusiasm. 

The first event was an exciting game of Dodge Ball, played by the 
new Mus and Sigmas. In this the Mus were victorious. Then 
came the chief event of the evening, the basketball game between 
the Old Girls. The line-up for the game was as follows : 

Sigma Mu 

Tov ) / Kent 

Bo y d \ Centers \ Barber-Wimberley 

™e I awards {™nT™ 

Collier, S. I l Yeiiou 

Cooper | Guards (Glass-Scott 

Everett \ GUardS < Ruffin 



£? The St. Maby's Muse 

♦1. ^1 te o mS Were WGl1 matched ' and h was onl ^ after a hard figh 
tnat the bigmas won with a score of 10 to 7. 

After the game there was a rush for the punch table, wher, 
Eleanor Sublett and Patty Sherrod held sway. To the girls, heatec 
from excitement, if from no more strenuous exercise, nothing coulc 
have been more welcome than the ice cold punch and crisp litth 
cakes All too soon the lights flashed for bedtime, and the long 
looked-forward-to Bloomer Party was over. . B. 

October 19— The Inter-Chapter Meeting 

On Sunday evening, October 19th, the first inter-chapter meeting 
of the Jmuo P Auxiliary was held in the parlor. Miss Katie, the 
head of the entire Junior Auxiliary at St. Mary's, opened the meet- 
ing with a few words of welcome to the new members, then turned 
the assembly over to the Life Work Committee. 

Annie Duncan, chairman of the committee here, explained the 
purpose of the Life Work Committee all over the United States as 
an issue of the Nation-wide Campaign. She stressed the impor- 
tance of considering the subject while we are still in school 

Catherine Boyd then read a short paper on "The Nurse," one 
phase of life work. Louise Powell followed with an article on "The 
Woman as a Doctor." Nina Cooper gave a brief talk on "The Mis- 
sionary," and Catharine Miller discussed the importance of the 
teacher and her work. 

This meeting was a further indication of the interest our St 
Marys delegates to the Blue Eidge Conference took in the work 
done and the suggestions made there. The Life Work Committee 
is still m rather the embryo state, but it is hoped that it will come 
to play an important part in the life at St. Mary's. L. P. 

October 22— The Great State Fair 

The stream of automobiles was halted abruptly as a mass of girls 
pushed eagerly toward the waiting street cars. St. Mary's was 
going to the Fair! Some of the girls boarded at least three cars 
before finding our special one, laughing gaily at their mistakes, 
while each frantic chaperon did her best to keep her excited party 



The St. Maky's Muse 19 



together. Mr. Stone played chief marshal and finally, with the 
assistance of irate conductors, installed us in our rightful places. At 
length the car moved off. The chaperons breathed sighs of relief, 
and Mr. Stone smiled again. But what is this? New Girls were 
heard loudly complaining, "I thought the Fair Grounds were out 
towards A. & E. What are we headed down town for?" Sure 
enough, we found that, to insure our getting seats, they had put us 
on a car that went all the way around the Capitol ! Upon learning 
that we really would eventually reach the Fair Grounds, the girls 
gave themselves up to the delights of watching the crowd, and enjoy- 
ing; the extra ride. 

Before long there were shouts of "I see the ferris wheel!" and 
soon we were actually there. Once on the grounds, the different 
parties separated, each going its own sweet way, in quest of side- 
shows, merry-go-rounds, "hot dogs," cotton candy, pink lemonade, 
and doll booths. Always there were one or two girls, persistently 
straying away from her crowd, but the vigilant chaperon usually 
managed to keep her little troop pretty well under her wing. 

After four hours of cheerful jostling among the crowds, the vari- 
ous parties dragged themselves to the street cars. Everybody was 
tired, everybody was "broke," everybody had a balloon or a "squee- 
dunk," if it hadn't burst, very few had the baby doll they had labored 
so lavishly for, and — everybody was happy ! L. P. 

October 23— The Carolina-]V. C. State Game 

It required very little imagination to guess the reason for the 
crowd of laughing girls assembled in front of Smedes Hall on 
Thursday afternoon, October 23d. The Carolina-E". C. State game ! 
It had been raining all morning, but what is rain compared to foot- 
ball? However, due to the motherly thoughtfulness of those to 
whom rain is a decided drawback to football, we had all been warned 
to take umbrellas and overshoes. Many of the girls forgot theirs 
in the excitement of getting off, and had to rush back for them at 
the last moment. In the meantime the procession, chaperoned by 
Mr. Stone, Miss Bottum, and Miss Leggett, started down the path 
by the Eectory. It left the school grounds and headed towards 



20 



The St. Mary's Muse 



State College. All the way out, we were busily discussing football, 
and joking about which side we should root for. 

At last we reached the Athletic Field. The perils of the ticket 
office were passed without mishap, and St. Mary's was cheered by 
both sides as we took our seats on the bleachers. After a long wait 
the Carolina team appeared upon the field, and soon afterwards the 
N. C. State warriors came on. It was well known that the teams 
were very evenly matched. The umpire's whistle sounded and 
everybody craned their necks to see the start of the game. It was 
N. C. State's first kick-off and then the game began in earnest. Caro- 
lina made the first touchdown, and in a short time State Collet 
scored one, too. In the last half K C. State scored another touch- 
down. Either side had kicked the goal. Carolina made the next 
touchdown, and there was a tense moment while the score stood 
even. Another moment and frantic cheers rent the air. Excite- 
ment reigned supreme, and nowhere was it greater than among the 
St. Mary's rooters for Carolina, for it was Leonora Blount's brother 
who had kicked the decisive goal! Thus the game ended, with the 
score 13 to 12 in favor of Carolina. 

That night a shouting pack of Carolina boys came running up the 
front walk and halted at the foot of Smedes Hall steps. The news 
spread through the buildings and the girls all gathered on the porch 
The K C. cheer leader climbed up on one of the stone posts and 
yelled : 

"Who won that game ?" 
and back came the roar : 
"Carolina !" 

"Who helped win that game ?" 
"St. Mary's!" 

Then the college yells, one right after another. Mr. Way was 
called upon to make a speech. He spoke a few words of congratu- 
lation and was cheered with great enthusiasm. The boys then sang 
their song, "Hark the Sound of Tarheel Voices," and with several 
parting cheers, marched away. p y 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 



October 23— "jtfaytime" 

One of the most enjoyable events of Fair Week for St. Mary's 
was "Maytime," to which, thanks to Miss Davis's untiring efforts, 
all of us who did not prefer seeing the football game were given the 
privilege of going. On the afternoon of October 23d practically 
half of the girls, chaperoned by Miss Dennis and Miss Neave, went 
to the matinee at the Academy. The Seniors enjoyed the special 
privilege of attending the night performance, and Miss Davis chap- 
eroned about twelve of them down to the Opera ( ?) House. In 
spite of copious tears at the sad fate of Otillie and Dick, every one 
had a good time, and all were delighted with the play. 

The musical numbers which added so much to the play made 
quite a hit with the girls. The waning popularity of "Sweetheart" 
has revived considerably, and snatches of the other tunes are often 
hummed about the School. C. M. M. 

October 25 — The Literary Society Eeceptiou 

The joint reception of the Sigma Lambda and Epsilon Alpha Pi 
Literary societies was given in honor of the new members on Satur- 
day evening, October 25th. 

Upon entering the parlor, each girl received her respective Society 
colors, which she promptly pinned on and wore throughout the 
evening with very evident pride. The room was simply decorated 
with yellow chrysanthemums and Society pennants, and the color 
effect was made still more beautiful by the gay colored evening 
gowns. Those in the receiving line were Mr. and Mrs. Way, Mrs. 
Perkins, Miss Katie, Miss Lee, Miss Sutton, Miss Fenner, Miss 
Dennis, Mr. Stone, and the officers of the two societies. 

The following program was successfully carried out, to the great 
enjoyment of all: 

"The Road to Paradise" Estelle Avent 

f Piano Nancy Lay 

"Sweet Hawaiian Moonlight" j violin Edith Miller 

Reading from "Seventeen" Catherine Miller 

Recitation: "The Thief" Millicent Blanton 

Spanish Dance Carolina Kirby-Smith 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 



To the New Girls there may have been nothing extraordinary in 
the refreshments which followed, but the Old— the very Old— Girls 
were carried back to the days "before the war" when they appeared. 
Banana salad, with crisp lettuce, olives, and crackers ! And yet, it 
was really no more enjoyed than the corn meal lady fingers of the 
war days ! Dancing followed, and the party broke up reluctantly 
at the ringing of the nine-thirty bell. 

The reception made a very favorable impression on the new 
members of both societies, and gave a good start to the literary year. 

C. T. 
October 31st— The Hallowe'en Ball 

It is a quarter past eight on Hallowe'en. The parlor is a mass of 
color. High-pitched voices and constant moving about betray curi- 
osity and excitement. One after another masked and curiously 
arrayed figure pauses to gaze intently at mysterious persons passing 
by. Suddenly there is a movement towards the hall; the line for 
the Grand March is being formed. What a strange assortment of 
partners ! A "heathen Chinee" and a ballet dancer lock arms, so 
also do a tiny girl and a bold pirate; and what business has a saintly 
nun with that swaggering gypsy ? But queer things happen on All 
Hallows' Eve. Sh-h-h! Do you believe in ghosts? Then follow 
the miscellanoeus throng. 

For a brief space it winds down dimly-lighted steps, passes into 
the night air, and thence to the "Gym." Of course, it's hard to 
recognize the familiar room, for the spirits have been at work. 
Dusky witches lurk in darkened corners, ready to read your fate. 
Four grinning devils, hideous and reel, entice you slyly to "The 
Devil's Cave," oh, gruesome place! Carefree gypsies, unaffected 
by the dim shadowy walls and the shades of men long since dead, are 
anxious to tell your fortune. With gay music ringing out (Miss 
Ebie is at the piano) the light-hearted procession, led by Marietta 
Gareissen and Elizabeth Hines, enters and forms a circle. Then 
into this circle marches a party of surprisingly young witches, in 
groups of six. (I'm told they are the Class of 1920!) 

These frivolous witches, with song and dance, are showing you 
how the styles for witches have changed since "long ago in eighteen 



The St. Mary's Muse 23 



orty." Each group is attired in an elaborate crepe paper costume, 
a the style of the period which it represents, and even the conven- 
ional witches' hats are subject to the whim of Dame Fashion, for 
ome indeed are "Merry Widow" and some are very small ! Then, 
bo, the styles in witches' broomsticks have undergone numerous 
hanges, for while the 1840 witch lugs a heavy brushwood broom, 
ler modern sister trips gayly along with an equally modern vacuum 
leaner ! Did you think of such a thing ? Well, it's over now and 
very one is applauding loudly. 

Dancing and talking, reading of fortunes, "ringing ghosts" and 
eceiving a prophecy of your future in return, guessing who's who, 
,11 begins noisily. Shrieks issue from The Devil's Cave. Many 
>eanuts and apples disappear, not to mention "all-day-suckers." 
I all happens rapidly, and before you know it every one, ghost, witch, 
>r clown, no matter how imposing or what his rank in his time, is 
>eing sent to bed by a very real person indeed — Miss Sutton. 

L. P. 

November 1st — Founders' Day 

In accordance with the time-honored custom of St. Mary's, Found- 
;rs' Day was celebrated in conjunction with the festival of All Saints, 
STovember 1st. The day was appropriately begun by the celebra- 
ion of the Holy Communion at ten minutes of seven, and the regular 
111 Saints' Day service was held at nine-thirty. Mr. Way made 
i brief address on the founder of the School, Dr. Aldert Smedes, 
lescribing how he came to found St. Mary's, and explaining the 
peculiar fitness of remembering him and his worthy successors on 
ill Saints' Day. 

After lunch the whole school assembled in the parlor for an 
nter-Society meeting, conducted by the Sigma Lambdas. This was 
;he first of the six Contest Meetings planned for the year, and a great 
ieal of interest was aroused. The meeting opened with the singing 
)f "Alma Mater," which was followed by an attractive and appro- 
priate program. "The Life of Dr. Aldert Smedes" was read by 
latharine Miller, and "A Day at Old St. Mary's" by Martha Best. 
•uite a hit was made by the song "When Miss Katie was a Teeny 
ittle Girl," sung by Rainsford Glass, Grace Franklin, and Mar- 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 



garet Bawlings, accompanied by Mr. Jones. The music for the sor 
had been composed by Mr. Jones on very short notice. Bebecc 
Cole then read a sketch on "Early Life at St. Mary's," and tl 
meeting closed by all rising and singing "Hail, St. Mary's."' 

F. P. V. 

Noreniber 11th— E. A. P. Armistice Bay Celebration 

On the evening of November 11th the whole school assemble 

in the parlor for the Armistice Day Celebration by the E. A. I 

Literary Society. The day was not a holiday at St. Mary's, auj 

aside from Mr. Way's special talk in Chapel the inter-Society mee 

ing was the only official notice taken of the day. This was th 

second of the Contest Meetings, and, with the Sigma Lambda ceh 

bration on Founders' Day, formed one item in the contest. Jan 

Toy opened the meeting with a stirring speech on the significanc 

of Armistice Day, and following her talk "Over There," sung b; 

everybody, carried the singers back to the war days, and brough 

back memories of the time when the boys were fighting in France 

Aside from being unusually well rendered, the patriotic progran 

which followed was very much in keeping with the spirit of the day 

Dorothy Kirtland recited "Pilgrims," by Eobert W. Service, and Le 

nore Powell read John MacCrae's popular poem, "In Flanders 

Fields." Next Kipling's beautiful "Recessional" was sung by EstelL 

Avent and a chorus, accompanied by Mr. Jones and violin obligate ty 

Edith Miller. Jane Toy's paper on "How the Signing of the Armis 

tice was Celebrated at St. Mary's," giving a graphic description oi 

that early morning celebration, was read by Mary Yellott, and hei 

"Dawn of Peace" was then inspiringly recited by Millicent Blanton, 

Then as a fitting close, every one rose for the Star-Spangled Banner. 

The judges decided this first item of the Contest in favor of the 

E. A. P. Society. C. B. 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 



"We Have With Us To-day" 

Fair Week, besides all its other excitements and attractions, was 
an excellent excuse for a sort of semi-class reunion of the newest 
Alumnse, and we enjoyed very much the short visit of Mildred Kirt- 
land, Elizabeth Waddell, Nina Burke, and Mary C. Wilson. Mil- 
dred and "Waddie" stayed at the School and considerably enlivened 
Senior Hall by their pepful presence. Twice during their stay the 
Seniors serenaded, just for old times sakes, and many were the 
memories recalled by the familiar strains of "Eveline," the strong 
tenor booming forth in "If You'll Be M-i-n-e, Mine I" and Waddie's 
inimitable yodel. It is on the infrequent occasions of these sere- 
nades that, meaning no offense to the Class of 1920, the dear old 
Seniors are most missed, and by none more than their successors ! 

Josephine Erwin blew in Saturday evening, in time for the Lit- 
erary Society Eeception, and was promptly decorated with a green 
and gold ribbon, renewing her allegiance to the E. A. P. Society. 
Maude Moss was a guest of the School at the same time. The oldest 
Old Girls were delightfully surprised by a brief visit from Alice 
Latham the following week, and a few days later we caught a fleet- 
ing glimpse of Anna Dortch. 

During the Fair there was such an invasion of mothers, fathers, 
brothers, sisters, uncles and aunts, and the inevitable "cousins" that 
it is impossible to name them all. Many, however, were the girls 
made happy by being allowed to "spend the night out in town with 
Mother," and to all is extended a cordial invitation to "Call again." 



Items of Interest 



Twice during the past month we have been fortunate enough to 
have outside speakers for the "Thursday Night Talk." On October 
30th Miss Flora Creech gave a very interesting account of some of her 
experiences while abroad with the Y. M. C. A. The applause which 
followed her talk was redoubled upon Mr. Stone's announcing that 
Miss Creech is an old St. Mary's girl. The following Thursday 
Miss King gave an enlightening, as well as enjoyable, talk on Mada- 



26 



The St. Mary's Muse 



gascar, where she has worked for a number of years, emphasizing the 
fact that its need of missionaries should not be overlooked, along with 
that of China, Africa, and the other mission fields. 

St. Mary's has again come out 100 per cent strong for the Eed 
Cross. The 1920 Membership Campaign was systematically con- 
ducted under the direction of Eleanor Sublett, the local chairman, and 
on Monday morning, November 3d, the captains of the four teams 
were able to report 100 per cent membership for the School. 

The members of the Choir had a special treat on Thursday evening, 
November 6th, when they were allowed to attend Mr. Jones' organ 
recital at Christ Church. 

The Bishop's daughter and her husband, Dr. Tucker, talked to 
the Junior Auxiliary on Sunday evening, November 9th. Knowing 
so well the conditions in China and her peculiar needs, Dr. Tucker 
gave a very interesting talk, and Mrs. Tucker told us some surprising 
things about the life of the Chinese woman. 

The Nation-wide Campaign is now the chief topic of thought and 
conversation. The faculty study class is meeting weekly at the Kec- 
tory, and the girls are holding a "Morning Watch" daily in the 
Chapel. A very interesting talk on the subject was given by Mrs. 
Bonner on Sunday evening, November 9th. Mrs. Bonner was a dele- 
gate to the Convention in Detroit, and she described several of the 
most important meetings which she attended, among them the meet- 
ing at which the Triennial Offering was made, and the three-day 
discussion of the Nation-wide Campaign. She too emphasized the 
point of the Church's need of men and women workers, and expressed 
the hope that many of the present St. Mary's girls may some day feel 
the call. 



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Patronize those who patronize you. Remember that it is 
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'You get them when promised" 

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There was a young lady named Dale 
Who bought a fine hat and a veil. 
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Though she's not paid the bill 
And the sheriff is hot on her trail. 



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THE FASHION 

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Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 

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Cfjrfetmaa dumber 



The St. Mary's Muse 

CHRISTMAS NUMBER 



Vol. XXV 



December, 1919 



No. 3 




The longest road must have a turning, and though it's been a 
long, long road we've traveled since September, the turning is in 
sight. The long-looked-forward-to holidays are almost here, and 
the nearer they come the longer we seem to have looked forward 
to them, and the more eagerly we look forward to them now. Decem- 
ber Eighteenth to January Sixth ! What can one not do with nine- 
teen glorious days ? After the first excited — perhaps weepy — greet- 
ing of the family (and nothing is more tearfully exciting than the 
greeting of one's family upon one's returning home for the Christmas 
holidays the first year off at boarding school) there are so many 
things clamoring to be done at once. Our "best girl friend" to call 
up and chat with, a ride with the "one and only" to see the sights 
(as if we didn't know them all by heart — the dear, familiar sights 
we've been brought up with!), but on this occasion we don't see 



The St. Mary's Muse 



much beyond the one and only, and later must stroll down the street 
arm in arm, perhaps, St. Mary's fashion, with the aforementioned 
best girl friend, to take them in anew. After discussing every sub 
ject under the sun, with that sympathy and understanding one finds 
only in one's best girl friend, and laboring under some slight diffi 
culties due to the necessity of nodding and speaking to everyone w< 
pass, then comes the inevitable question — the question we have beer 
awaiting, well knowing it would come, the question we must alreadj 
have answered in our own minds. 

"How do you like St. Mary's ?" 

Now is your chance to prove yourself a real St. Mary's Girl — an<» 
it won't be by slamming St. Mary's. After all, you know, it's nojr 
your school — it's you! It's the girls that make the School, and 
when you slam St. Mary's, you're slamming all the rest of us. And 
of course you like the girls ! Some of them better than others, per 
haps — some of them are nicer than others, though fortunately we 
don't all think the same ones are nicest, nor like the same ones best.i 
But for all that, good, bad, or indifferent (and the indifferent ones 
are the worst) it's the girls that make St. Mary's ! 

So it's rather like the little verse you learned in the Fifth Grade 

to supplement your "Good-morning" to the teacher on Friday 

mornings : 

"Diving and finding no pearls in the sea, 
Blame not the ocean, the fault is in thee!" 

If you're only the right kind of diver, you'll find the pearls,- 
and if you're only the right kind of girl, you'll love St. Mary's! If 
you don't, then keep it secret, and if you guard your secret well 
enough, perhaps people will never know it, and will think you are 
the kind of girl you would really like to be. (You don't admit it| 
of course, but you would, just the same.) And if you do, them 
talk up your School. Let people see you love St. Mary's, and kno"W 
you are the kind of girl you are! 

The Muse wishes you all a Merry Christmas, and hopes that 
you will all be back in January, ready to start again on the long, 
long road, whose turning this time is a sharp corner and comes m 
far-off May. 






The St. Mary's Muse 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by The Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 



Editors 
Jane Toy Nancy Lay 

Eleanor Sublett 



Christmas Voices 

Maby T. Yellott, '20 

While the Christmas bells are ringing 
There are distant voices singing, 

Singing softly in the distance, singing sweetly far away. 
Through the tumult we can hear them, 
Through the ages that endear them 

To the countless hearts that echo what the music seems to say. 

While the Christmas snow is falling 
There are distant voices calling, 

Calling ev'ry heart that hesitates to battle with the storm. 
.Though the snows of life are chilling, 
There are joys that are thrilling 

With the love of life, and, loving life, the coldest heart grows warm. 

While the Christmas stars are shining 
There are mystic voices twining, 

Twining severed hearts together, reconciling friends again. 
For the Christmas bells are ringing 
And the Christmas voices singing, 

Singing softly, singing sweetly, "Peace on earth, good will to men!" 



The St. Maky's Muse 



Var)itas Vanitatum 

Jane Toy, '20 

Bowman's shop window was brilliantly lighted and festively dec- 
orated with be-berried holly. Its display was made up of hats — big 
hats, little hats, fuzzy hats, slick hats, hats of every color and de- 
scription — but its crowning glory was high above the others, in 
the center of the window. It was a hat! Made of soft folds of 
purple velvet, it fairly glowed with the delicious richness of the 
satisfying color. But this was not all. Around the soft brim there 
was a fringe, a delicate, graceful, waving fringe of curling ostrich 
feathers, some turning provocatively up, some tantalizingly down, 
with an airiness that was fairly captivating. Oh, it was a dream, 
that purple hat, a dream such as one sees only once or twice in a life- 
time, which one remembers with many a secret regret, even while 
one is buying and wearing commonplace sailors and toques. 

All these longings and regrets were struggling now in Ella May's 
young heart as she gazed in at the purple hat from the bleakness 
of the cold December dusk. The dazzling window seemed a bit 
of fairyland, hardly real, that might vanish at any minute from 
before her hungry eyes. She gazed in at the purple dream, forgetful 
of time and place, conscious only of a great aching desire for it. 
She pictured herself in it; it was just her style — and Oh, how she 
wanted it! Every day for a week now, coming and going from 
Bettie Barker's Bonnet Shop, where she trimmed and fitted hats 
all day, she had been half afraid to look at Bowman's window, for 
fear that the purple hat would be gone. But each time she had 
breathed a sigh of relief as she saw the familiar shape poised proudly, 
carelessly, mockingly above the other hats. 

Ella May had worked on hats for two years now, and she knew 
the fine points of the game. Her own hats she always contrived 
cleverly out of odd bits. At first this had been fun, but now she 
was tired of it. For two years she hadn't had a "bought" hat, and 
she longed for one with all the pent-up craving of her beauty and 
style-loving soul. And here was the hat, above all others, that she 
wanted! She needed it, too, for her old black silk hat was out of 



The St. Mart's Muse 



season, and besides was growing shabby. She needed a dressier hat 
for afternoons and Sundays, and — here her heart gave a funny little 
jump — for day after tomorrow, Christmas! when she was going 
to ride with Jim Anderson. Jim was Junior Partner in Winton's 
Garage and Auto Station, and for several months he and Ella May 
had been "going together." Jim hadn't been around to see her for 
several weeks though, and she had heard rumors of his rushing the new 
manicure girl at Bowman's. Yesterday, however, she had met him 
on the street; they had had a sundae together, and he had asked 
for a date Christmas afternoon. She knew they would go riding — 
they always did — and she didn't have a decent hat to her name! 
If only she could get the purple one ! 

She sighed and turned away; then a happy thought struck her. 
Maybe after all, the hat wasn't so awfully dear ; she could find out, 
anyway, and suiting the action to the word she made her way 
bravely into the store and asked the price from a condescending 
milliner. 

"The purple hat with the feathers? Let me see — that's fifteen 
dollars, quite a bargain, indeed. Would you care to try it on ?" 

"]STot today, thank you," Ella May managed to say, as she turned 
to go out. Fifteen dollars! After all, that wasn't much, if only 
she had a way of getting it ! A swift calculation of her resources 
showed a bare eight dollars possible. And then, with a start, she 
remembered a resource that she had forgotten — Miss Bettie's Christ- 
mas gift! Every year Miss Bettie (who was neither young nor 
giddy, as her name suggests, but a capable lady with iron gray hair) 
gave each of her clerks a ten dollar bill. This was certain, too; 
there wasn't a doubt that tomorrow, Christmas Eve, as they left 
the shop Miss Bettie would give each of them an envelope as she 
wished them Merry Christmas, and in that envelope there would 
be a crisp ten dollar bill. So she could get the purple hat! It 
seemed too good to be true, after all her longings, which she had 
thought were vain ! Ella May's cheeks glowed and her eyes sparkled; 
she would ask the milliner to keep the hat for her till Christmas 
Eve. She turned to do so, and then — then her eyes fell on a pink 
crepe de chine negligee hanging on the counter above her. A dainty 



The St. Mart's Muse 



thing it was, with its airy laces and ribbons; the most harmless, 
inoffensive looking thing imaginable, but it struck Ella May's hopes 
a deadly blow. For above the kimona was a price tag, $16.98, andi 
the moment the figures caught her eye she knew that she ought 
to get it for Ruth — Ruth, her little sixteen-year-old sister, who lay 
at home, an invalid. And Ruth wanted a negligee ; Ella May knew, 
for she had seen her going over the pictures of them in catalogs, 
and she knew Ruth's love for pretty things. Poor child, she didn't 
have many, but those she had she cherished with a tenderness that; 
was pathetic. Ella May looked up at the dainty kimona; it was 1 
lovely, and would suit Ruth exactly. 

"Heaven knows," thought Ella May, "I know what it' is to want 
things so bad that you can taste 'em, and I reckon the kiddie wants 
this as bad as I do the hat. Well, I won't have the woman put the 
hat up for me tonight, anyway," and she turned towards the door — 
and the hat! There it was, as tantalizingly beautiful as ever. If 
Ella May's heart had ached before with the longing for it, it was 
ready to burst now. She wavered, took a step back — she would have 
the hat reserved, and then something stopped her. She saw that the 
manicure girl was talking to the milliner, and she couldn't bear the 
thought of going in there again before her! So she turned out 
towards the cold street, her heart in a turmoil. 

Though she had left the shop, the picture of the purple hat danced 
before her eyes, and even when she reached home it refused to be 
banished. When she carried Ruth her supper tray it took a great 
effort for her to be her natural self, for the sight of her little sister's 
wan face made the ache in her heart worse than ever. 

"Get my boudoir cap, Big Sis," Ruth called gaily as Ella May 
entered, "the lacy one with the pink bow, and we'll have a real 
party, for it's most Christmas Eve, and we're all excited about 
what Santy Claus is goin' to bring us, aren't we, Big Sis? Want 
to see somethin' bee-uu-tiful ? Promise not to tell anybody — look !" 
and pulling a catalog from under her pillow, she held up before 
Ella May the picture of a kimona, almost the exact counterpart of 
the one in Bowman's. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



"That's lovely, kiddie," she smiled. "Maybe Santy'll bring it to 
you — who knows V 

"That would be too good to be true — and don't you go and tell 
Mamma I'm crying for it, 'cause I'm not. It's just so bee-uu-tiful 
I had to show it to somebody to get it off my mind, and now it's off ! 
You know how it is, don't you, Big Sis ?" And she played with Ella 
May's hand caressingly. 

This settled it — the kiddie must have her kimona. The purple 
hat could go to the mischief ! 

"Through, honey ? Now lie back while I do the dishes, and then 
Fll come back and see you some more," and she gratefully seized 
the opportunity to be alone. After all, though, now that it was 
decided it wasn't so very bad — not half so bad as the agonizing 
indecision. 

Ella May was no coward. Having settled the question she stuck 
to it, even when she passed the purple hat next morning and relent- 
lessly ordered the kimona to be put aside for her. 

"There, that's over with, thank heaven," she thought, as she left 
the store — but she couldn't help throwing a last glance towards 
the purple dream in the window. 

All day long she tried to feel virtuous, but the picture of her 
old black hat kept coming before her mind. "Well, I'll just have 
to make the best of the old thing," she thought. "I haven't the 
heart to scrape up a new one," and she grimly set about selecting 
some blue ribbons to freshen it up. 

Closing time came at last, and in a moment Ella May was on her 
way to Bowman's. Miss Bettie had not disappointed her, and in 
her bag the new ten dollar bill fairly crackled with importance. 
Now she was at Bowman's, and her head turned from force of habit 
to the window. Horrors ! What had changed it so ? At first she 
could hardly realize it — the purple hat was no longer there ! 

"Nutty of me to think it would stay there forever! Well, I 
reckon it's best after all. Maybe I'll forget about it now," and 
having purchased the negligee she left the store, her head held 
bravely high, even when she passed the window, now so strangely 
bare. 



The St. Maky's Muse 



"O-oo-ee, it's the bee-uu-tiful kimona! You precious Big Sis 
you're just too sweet to me! How did you get it? I'm just tn 
happiest girl that ever was !" 

It was Christmas morning, and Ella May, looking at Euth's happy 
face, was glad of what she had done, though even now in the back 
of her heart there was the aching memory of the purple hat. It 
refused to be banished, even that afternoon when she stepped into 
the car with Jim, and all during the drive it hung like a black 
cloud over her happiness. She felt that she wasn't being good! 
company for Jim, that she hadn't any pep, and oh, dear, it was 
all because of that blamed purple hat! Something seemed to be 
on Jim's mind too, and in spite of their efforts they couldn't be free 
and natural with each other as usual. Altogether, the drive couldn't' 
have been said to be a huge success, and as they stopped before the 
Rest-a-Bit Tea Room, Ella May felt ready to weep. And then, to: 
cap the climax, what should she see coming down the street but! 
the purple hat, on the manicure girl's head! That was too much!! 
Tears started to Ella May's eyes; she couldn't keep them back, but 
she fumbled with her glove, and prayed that Jim wouldn't see them. 
He didn't, but what was almost as bad, he saw the hat — in fact, 
he stared at it, and its wearer, for what seemed to Ella May an 
agonizing length of time. Finally he broke the silence. 

"Well, I'll say, that's some color for you — reg'lar nigger purple ! 
Makes me sick, don't it you? And those feathers! Gosh, they give 
me the wiggles. The girl, too — that hat suits her to a T — that loud! 
style. You know what I mean. And you're just what she's not, 
Ella May, dear and sweet and — and — but you know what I mean, 
honey," Jim paused, but his hand found hers, and when Ella May 
raised her eyes to his she was overcome by the glowing tenderness 
in them. 

"Oh !" she breathed, "oh — oh !" But Jim didn't know everything 
those "Oh's" meant. 



The St. Mart's Mtjse 



Four Christri)ases it) France 

Nancy Lay, '20 

It was Christmas of 1913, and everywhere in the little village of 
Dinar d could be seen the signs of festivity and rejoicing. Gifts 
were being made for "la mere" and "le pere/' and the children were 
placing their little shoes in neat, even rows before the fire for "le 
petit Noel." 

Perhaps the gayest time of all was being enjoyed in the "Little 
Eed House on the Hill." They seemed so happy, this family of 
five. La grand' mere, wrapped in her bright, red shawl, sat by the 
fire with dancing eyes as she watched her daughter, Madame Mon- 
fees, baking little spice cakes in the oven and preparing bon-bons 
for the children. Julion, the eldest, sixteen years old, bustled in 
and out of the house, piling wood on the fire and shouting and laugh- 
ing with his sister. Marie was almost thirteen and considered her- 
self quite a young lady, especially as she had a sweetheart in the 
village, who came to see her every day and brought her little candies 
from the store. He was Henri Martin, and as his mother had died 
when he was very young, Madame Monfees had always taken a 
special interest in him. The three children had grown up together, 
having their agreements and disagreements, as children will. They 
.were a happy trio, but of late the intimacy between Henri and Marie 
was ever increasing, so that Julion, in spite of himself, felt just a 
little left out. 

Of course, much to Marie's delight, Henri was always invited 
to come over Christmas Day and see the little tree of pine and 
the little manger, glowing with the bright candles. Papa was 
also expected for Christmas. He had been released from his duties 
for the sole purpose of going home for the day. IsTo wonder there 
was such merriment in the little house, such a bustle and hurry 
about getting things ready, and such love and joy in the hearts of 
them all. 

The next day was Christmas, and toward the middle of the morn- 
ing, when the children were getting tired of games and fun, Papa 
breezed in with his cheery greeting, "XJn joyeux Noel, mes cheries!" 



10 The St. Maky's Muse 



And oh, what a scramble there was to get next to Papa, to kiss 
him, and, incidentally, to see what he had brought with him ! There 
was a present for each one of them, even Henri, for he had always 
been considered a member of the family. 

And when the night came and all but Monsieur and Madame 
Monfees had gone to bed, the two sat there, watching the shadows 
dancing on the walls of their cozy home, and their hearts filled 
with Christmas joy and peace. They gazed into the flames, dream- 
ing of the happy Christmases to come. Little they knew what the 
future held for them ! 



* * * * 



A year had passed since that happy Christmas in Dinard, and 
more than a year's change had taken place in the little village. War 
had come in August, little Belgium had been drained of her life 
blood, and France was now fast falling into the clutches of the 
enemy. M. Monfees had gone in the early days of the war, leaving 
his wife and family in the night. It was a pitiful little group that 
had gathered around him to tell him good-bye. Poor old Orand'mere 
trembled as she kissed him, and Marie sobbed on his shoulder. 

"Be a good little girl, ma 'petite," he said, "and be brave, my son," 
he said to Julion, who stood very straight by his father's side. "You 
must take my place. I do not know how long I will be gone, but 
have courage, Julion, and take good care of them all." 

His wife's eyes were filled with tears as he clasped her to him 
and whispered in her ear. She choked back her sobs and tried to 
smile through her tears as he tore himself away from them. 

"It has come, as I thought it would, and I must go. Au revoir, 
mes amours!" 

Then had followed the black days of anxiety and uncertainty. 
Many of the French towns were taken by the Germans, but, so far, 
Dinard had escaped them. Once in a great many days news would 
come from M. Monfees, and although he tried to make the little 
notes cheering and encouraging, there could always be found that 
note of hopelessness and despondency. 



The St. Mary's Muse 11 



It was Christmas Eve when one of these little messages came to 
Madame Monfees, telling her of his disappointment at not being 
able to be with them for Christmas. 

"But we must try to make it a happy Christmas, my Julion," 
said Madame Monfees to her son, "although Papa will not be with 
us." 

So the little manger was placed under the tree and Mamma 
scraped together what sweets she could find to give to the children. 
They could hardly be called children any longer, Julion and Marie. 
They had both matured. Julion declared every day was his last at 
home and that he must join his father and help him in the fight. 
Marie, too, had grown more serious. She helped her mother with 
her sewing and sat for hours at a time by Grand'mere, knitting for 
her Papa and the other soldiers. Henri also was no child. He 
often reminded Marie, as he sat by the fire holding her wool, that 
he would soon be going to war. 

And so as Christmas Day dawned clear and cold, it was with 
heavy hearts rather than light that the little family gathered around 
the manger to sing their Christmas carols. As the last "Noel" died 
away, the door opened suddenly. The little group stood transfixed. 
Surely the Christ Child had wrought a miracle! In the doorway 
stood M. Monfees, a gallant figure in his uniform of blue. In a 
moment they were all about him, sobbing and laughing for joy. 

"Mes cheries," he said, "I cannot stay. My men are waiting for 
me at the foot of the hill." 

His eyes as they passed from one to another were filled with 
an infinite longing. In that fleeting moment he had a presentiment 
that he would never look on his dear ones again. Henri and Julion, 
standing on the edge of the little group, clasped hands, moved by 
the same emotion, thrilled to their very souls. The father's eyes 
met theirs. A spark of understanding seemed to flash between 
them. Henri spoke: 

"We must go too. We can wait no longer." 

"We are no longer children, mon pere" said Julion. "France 
is calling to us. We must go !" 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 



M. Monfees was filled with a tender pride in his two brave boys 
"La pauvre mere," he sighed. "Mais, c'est la guerre!" 

* * * * 

There was a low rumble in the distance, and an ambulance rolled 
over the cobble stones, drawing near to the Little Red House on 
the Hill. 

Marie looked up from her knitting and then, with a sigh, returned 
to her work. But what was that ? The ambulance had stopped. 
Marie's needles ceased clicking. Her heart seemed to stop beating. 
There was a low knock at the door, and the latch was lifted. The^ 
door opened slowly and there, outlined in the soft glow of the fading 
twilight, stood Henri. His face was pale and drawn with pain 
and in his eyes still glowed the light of battle. His right arm hung 
in a sling. 

At the sight of him there, wounded and suffering, Marie's heart 
seemed torn within her. In a moment she had thrown herself upon 
him, sobbing with uncontrolled emotion. He pressed her to his 
heart and kissed her tenderly. For awhile neither spoke, the mo- 
ment was too sacred. Then Henri broke the silence. 

"I cannot stay, cherie," he said. "I am on the way to the hospital, 
and it was only the kindness of the ambulance driver that gave me 
this moment. Is all well?" 

"We have had great trouble, Henri. La pauvre Grand'mere, she 
died last week." She cried softly awhile on his shoulder, then asked 
Henri if he knew anything of Julion. 

"I saw Julion in our last encounter," he answered. "He was 
leading his men over the top, with his head thrown back and his 
eyes to the front. Then there was a flash and something struck 
my arm, and everything grew black. The next thing I knew, I was 
lying in the ambulance, on the way to the hospital." 

He staggered a bit and fell into a chair. His face had grown 
pale with the strain and his strength was failing. 

"Henri!" cried Marie, "you are ill!" 



The St. Mart's Muse 13 

"It is nothing," he replied. "I am only a little faint." He 
paused. "And now I must leave you, ma cherie. The ambulance 
can wait no longer. Take care of yourself, darling, and be brave. 
'Nous les auroTis' !" 

"Au revoity Henri. I will pray le ton Dieu for you," she said, 
as she passed her hand over his arm. He kissed her once more and 
then turned away. 

"Un joyeux Noel!" she called after him. She watched the am- 
bulance drive down the hill. It grew smaller, until it was a mere 
speck on the horizon. Then — nothing. A deep shudder trembled 
through her body. She turned from the threshold, closing the door 
behind her. The little candles on the tree had burned down to almost 
nothing, the light had died out of the room, and with a sigh Marie 
turned again to her knitting. 

* * * * 

Two years have passed since the sad Christmas of 1917, and 
Noel has come again to the little red house. Twilight is falling 
and the stars are coming out. Let us draw near to the window, 
where the candle burns so brightly, for the scene which the tiny 
panes reveal within is one of Christmas joy and peace. 

The little tree stands on the table, where it has always stood, f«r 
30 many years, and almost as many candles burn in the little manger 
is used to light it in the happy days of plenty, before the war. A 
3right fire crackles on the hearth, the sparks fly and the logs fall 
ipart, making the shadows dance on the walls. All the family is 
here, except la grand/mere and le pere. Poor souls ! They have 
ived their lives and won their rest. La mere is sitting by the fire- 
ride with a happy smile on her face. Her hair has just a tinge of 
vhite in it now and her cheeks are not so pink; as they were. But 
\he smiles as she looks down at her boy beside her. Julion is sitting 
there, his hand clasped in hers, and his eyes gaze up at her in per- 
fect contentment. Tall, handsome Julion, who has fought so hard 
n the war to save his country and his loved ones ! Yes, he has 
von his reward. A Croix de Guerre has been pinned upon his 
>reast. 



14 



The St. Maky's Muse 



On the other side of the fireplace, very near the little manger, sits 
Marie. Her head is bent over the tiny bundle she holds in her arms 
and she laughs softly as the baby kicks and squirms. She is very 
happy tonight, and her eyes seem to outshine the candles that burn 
by the manger, as she looks up at the tall man who stands beside 
her. Yes, it is Henri who is there. But quite a different Henri 
from the one we saw last. His face no longer looks pale and thin, 
but glows with health and energy. His sling is gone now, and he 
rests his arm on the back of Marie's chair as he looks down at the 
tiny baby in her arms. 

"Ma cherie" he whispers to her, "this is the most beautiful gift 
le bon Dieu could have given us for this, our second Christmas of 
Peace!" 



/OJk*C * jo,j CKl, bo*. w,l( 


be , to TivuA 


\*c*-i- k.o »w,e»i.ck ck.14. 


j S* 




I0( 




f\*A>. Q>* 






7J1 


C ^^^^li 




Mother- arvd. the. JBoX. 




The Boy. <Ln.cL lia,r^ y ' 



The St. Maby's Muse 15 



The Christmas Star 

Jane Toy, '20 

The street car clanged along the crowded street with a holiday 
jangle. It was dusk, with lights twinkling all around in the crisp 
winter air. Under street lamps and in front of shop windows people 
could be seen hurrying to and fro, all intent on some happy errand, 
, loaded with bundles, and all with glowing faces. Small wonder — 
, it was Christmas Eve, and even the impersonal street car was filled 
with the spirit of the season. All its occupants were smiling to 
• themselves or at each other. The fat lady with the red plume on 
i her hat beamed over the huge bundle she was hugging, and across 
I the aisle a pale little shop girl flashed an answering smile. The 
man in the shabby overcoat shrank back diffidently to the edge of his 
seat (it was the one shared by the lady of the red plume), but his 
chapped hand seemed to persist of its own accord in sliding down 
to his bulging pocket, and feeling its contents caressingly. In front 
of him a little school boy had no scruples as to displaying his treas- 
ure; he held it up to watch it sparkle in the light, and sniffed it 
contentedly every few minutes, for it was a bottle of perfume for 
his "best girl." The other passengers watched him with sympathetic 
amusement; after all, it was Christmas Eve, so why not be gay 
and careless, and silly, maybe, for once! 

The car stopped with a jerk. It had by this time passed the shops 
and now there were few lights to be seen and fewer people on the 
street. Only one person got on — a woman, past middle age, work- 
worn and homely. The merry passengers glanced at her unfestive 
appearance rather dubiously as she entered, but as she came down 
the aisle their expressions changed. The face of the little shop girl, 
who at first had turned up her nose at the stranger, grew serious, 
sympathetic, and her eyes shone with love and admiration. The 
little school boy, looking up from his perfume, suddenly seemed to 
forget all about it, for his mouth and eyes both opened wide with 
boyish awe. The lady of the red plume looked up, too, and her 
genial expression changed to one of genuine sadness, while her plump 



16 



The St. Mary's Muse 



hand fumbled for a frank pocket handkerchief. The man in the 
shabby overcoat, when he saw the newcomer, rose awkwardly, and 
taking off his brown derby he helped the old lady into his seat. 

The car moved on through the night with the same holiday jangle, 
but inside all was different, for the spirit of the passengers had 
changed; they no longer smiled, but the glow in their eyes was j 
better than a smile. By the side of the fat lady the newcomer sat 
unconscious of the change she had caused. She did not smile either, 
and there was no glow in her eyes. On her arm there shone a gold 
star, small and simple, mounted on a plain black band, but it shone 
with the same light that came from the Star of Bethlehem on the 
first Christmas Eve, two thousand years ago. 




The St. Mary's Muse 17 



The Spirit of Christmas 

Louise Egleston, '23 

How it thrills our hearts and spirits, 

Voices gay and laughter light! 
How it speeds our eager footsteps 

To the farewell feast that night! 
While the candles shine on faces 

Almost brighter than their glow, 
Setting tiny trees a-twinkle 

When the lights are burning low. 

Hear the happy voices rising 

As the oysters disappear — 
Fill our hearts with joy ecstatic 

And the room with nosy cheer. 
So you want to know the reason! 

Can there be the slightest doubt 
What the noise and cheer and bustle 

At St. Mary's is about? 

Can't you feel the Christmas spirit? 

Does it fail to thrill you through 
When you know the train tomorrow 

Will be waiting there for you — 
To take its happy burden 

To the dearest place on earth? 
Oh, of course you've got that feeling 

Of contagious joy and mirth! 

Thursday morning from the Chapel 

All with smiling lips we come, 
Singing "On our way rejoicing" 

.While our hearts sing "Home, Sweet Home." 
Young or old, the wide world over, 

Men, wherever they may roam, 
Know that X-m-a-s, Christmas, 

Just means H-o-m-e, home! 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price Two Dollars 

Single Copies Twenty-five Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1919-20 
Mary T. Yellott, '20, Editor-in-Chief 
Catherine Miller, '20 Catharine Boyd, '20 

Crichton Thorne, '23 Mabel Norfleet, '23 

Frances Venable, '22 Louise Powell, '22 

Jane Ruffin, '20, Business Manager 
Ernest Cruikshank, Faculty Director 



EDITORIAL 

As announced in the first issue of the monthly, this third number, 
the Christmas Muse, is edited by the E. A. P. Literary Society, 
and, together with the Thanksgiving number, edited by the Sigma 
Lambdas, forms one item in the literary contest. These two mag- 
azines will be judged as to the quantity and quality of the material 
submitted, and the decision of the judges will be announced in the 
January number. There are still four numbers of the Muse to be 
gotten out by the two societies so, whether E. A. P. or Sigma 
Lambda, you have two more opportunities to see something of your 
own in print. Don't forget that the Muse is dependent as much on 
you as anyone else, and unless you are going to bear your share 
of the responsibility, somebody else must bear an extra share. So 
far the contributions have been chiefly from the old girls, and from 
the older ones of those. Don't be bashful! Youll never get any- 



The St. Mary's Muse 19 



where if you don't begin. Let's see if we can't have more contribu- 
tions next month — stories, essays, or poems, long or short, serious 
3r funny, we aren't particular as to style. It's the display of interest 
that's encouraging, and the lack of it that makes a down-hearted 
Editor and a Muse that's not up to the mark. 



Do you sometimes think — and sometimes say — "Life is just one 
blame meeting after another" ? It isn't really, though it does some- 
times seem so. But did you ever happen to notice that that remark 
never follows the announcement of a Sigma or Mu meeting? It's 
a fine thing to have pep in athletics, but it would be better to divide 
up your pep and save some of it for the other interests and activities 
of school life. If you went to every meeting with the same en- 
thusiasm and ready interest you take with you to the "English and 
History Eooms in the Art Building," you would find the other 
meetings quite as worth while in their way. Chapter meetings, 
society meetings, committee meetings of any sort, class meetings — 
oh, above all, class meetings! When the president calls a meeting 
of your class don't say "I'm only one out of thirty, or forty, or fifty 
— they won't miss me," and stay away. You are one out of just so 
many, and therefore they will miss you. Why, if all the other ones 
took your view point and stayed away, what sort of class would yours 
be? It's a safe rule to follow — Go to all meetings and take your 
PEP along! 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 



SCHOOL NEWS 
November 15 — The Muse Club Circus 

One of the events of the school year most missed last fall was the 
Circus which, owing to the flu and other causes, had to be dispensed 
with. The Circus this year, however, more than made up for lost 
time, and even if the poster advertising it as "The Greatest Circus 
in the World" was guilty of a slight exaggeration, certainly the Muse 
Club Circus of 1920 was as worthy of the title as the past Muse Club 
Circuses which have claimed it. 

There was everything needed for a first class circus — the sawdust 
ring, presided over by a very efficient ringmaster in the disguised 
person of Millicent Blanton, and side shows of every description, 
from the fat and thin ladies to a swimming match in the Great Eed 
Sea, even including a wild woman, the maniac of Mrs. Jarley's Wax 
Works. There were animals, big and little, clowns, bareback riders, 
fancy dancers, and acrobats. And of course there were hot dogs, 
ice cream cones, pop corn and peanuts. What more could be wanted 
in a circus ? A crazy house ! O certainly, there was a crazy house, 
and never was any crazy house more popular. Attended by little 
red devils, it did a flourishing business throughout the evening. 

Nancy Lay and her Bohemian Orchestra, organized for the occa- 
sion, made quite a hit and very good music, as well. The elephant 
found it too much for his dignity, and jazzed around the ring in per- 
fect time to "That's Where My Money Goes." Besurrected from the 
past, the little white rabbit and the mock turtle lived again and Puss 
in Boots strode proudly to and fro, disdaining the meddlesome 
monkey which insisted on getting in the way despite his owner's 
efforts to subdue him — or should I say her, for it was none other 
than Muriel Dougherty. As soon as the animals could be coaxed 
out of the ring the other acts followed in quick succession. The rol- 
licking clown beseeched a country-come-to-town lady to step out of 
the way. The bareback riders managed their steeds beautifully, 
and daringly jumped off and on. Mary Strange Morgan tripped 
the light fantastic through a graceful little dance, and later in the 
evening she and Elizabeth Lawrence did their Italian dance and were 



The St. Mart's Muse 21 



enthusiastically applauded. Under the skillful direction of Mary 
Hoke, the acrobats made pyramids of themselves and tumbled about 
most surprisingly. Altogether, the "Big Show" was well worth 
seeing. 

Meanwhile, the side-shows were crowded, and eager throngs waited 
their turn at the "hot dog" stand, ice cream counter, and pop corn 
and peanut booth. Judging from the reluctance with which the 
"Gym" was cleared at nine-thirty, the "Greatest Circus in the World" 
was as much a success from the girls' point of view as from the Muse 
Club's, and the Muse Club considered it a very great success indeed. 

L. P. 



November 19 — Expression Recital 

In the auditorium on Wednesday afternoon, November 19, Miss 
Davis' Private Expression pupils gave their first recital. The stage 
was prettily decorated with ferns and yellow chrysanthemums. The 
program consisted of a number of monologues, selected with Miss 
Davis' usual good judgment, and the girls appeared to good advan- 
tage in the pieces assigned them. There was a large and apprecia- 
tive audience, representing both the girls and the faculty, and a 
number of girls from Peace Institute came over for the occasion. 

Millicent Blanton, reciting "Courting Under Difficulties," added 
another to her list of successes on the stage. An almost equal ap- 
plause followed Eleanor Sublett's first appearance in a little-boy 
recitation, "Just 'Pore Christmas." Conspicuous among the new 
girls were Fielding Douthat and Lorraine Smythe, who gave dra- 
matic representations of "Photographing Baby" and "At the Mati- 
nee." The program was rather long, but on the whole it was very 
well rendered and was thoroughly enjoyed. The other numbers were 
as follows : 

"In Schooldays" Phoebe Palmer 

"Catching the Flu" Frances Miller 

"Dancing School and Dicky" Josephine Dixon 

"A Tailor Made Gown" Lucile Hardy 

"The Introduction" Jean Gales 

M. N. 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 



November 20— The House Warming 

On Thursday afternoon, November 20th, the Kector and Mrs 
Way, Mrs. Perkins, and the Faculty held a delightful reception ii 
the nature of a House Warming, to mark the improvements in thj 
Main Building. The Alumnae and other friends of St, Mary's wer. 
invited, and a great many of the Ealeigh people attended, despite th< 
inclemency of the weather. The reception was also given in honor o: 
the new Lady Principal, and in addition to Mrs. Perkins, Mr. anc 
Mrs. Erwin, Mrs. Leak, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Koot, Mrs. Bennet 
Smedes, Mrs. Mary Smedes Poyner, Dr. and Mrs. Aldert Koot, Mr 
and Mrs. Watkins Eobards and Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Vass, of the 
Smedes family, were to be guests of honor. Some of the family, 
however, were unfortunately prevented from being present. 

Perns, autumn leaves, and yellow chrysanthemums played the 
largest part in the decorations, and toned in well with the general 
color scheme, which was carried out in yellow. The guests were 
received by Mr. and Mrs. Way, Mrs. Perkins, Dr. and Mrs. Aldert 
Eoot, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Eoot, Miss Katie, Dr. and Mrs. Knox, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Vass. After being served by the Seniors with fruit 
salad and coffee, they passed into the hall where Miss Dowd, presiding 
over an artistically decorated punch bowl, served punch and cakes. 
Several Juniors, acting as guides, then escorted the visitors upstairs, 
where the spacious lobby, the tiled bathrooms and several attractive 
bedrooms, which made up part of the Smedes Hall improvements, 
were thrown open for inspection. 

During the entire afternoon Nancy Lay and her Bohemian Orches- 
tra, of circus fame, furnished music for the occasion, and added 
much to the enjoyment of the guests. C. B. 



November 22— Basketball Doubleheader 

The Basket Ball season of 1919-20 opened Saturday night, Novem- 
ber 22d, with a double-header between the First and Third teams 
of the Sigma and Mu Athletic Associations. The Sigma First Team 
was crippled by the loss of three of its best players, but nevertheless 
presented a formidable array when it came upon the court for the 



The St. Mary's Muse 



23 



opening game. Both sides showed excellent team work, and the 
game ended with the score 27 to 13, in favor of the Mus. Conspicu- 
ous on the Sigma side was the playing of Madge Blakeley, forward, 
and Mary Wyatt Yarborough, guard, substituting on the First Team. 
Among the Mu players, Harriet Barber starred in the center, and 
Margaret McCabe, the only new girl on the team, proved the wisdom 
of her selection as forward. The line-up was as follows : 

Mu 
Sigma 

v ( Kent 

Hoke { Centers ] Barber 

Efoyd I ( 

. . ( Yellott 

Underwood J Forwards ] McCabe 

Blakeley i ' ( 

) ( Glass, R. 

Roberson-Yarborough ^ ( 

In the Third Team game the Mus were again victorious, with the 
score 20 to 15. Following is the line-up: 

Mu 
Sigma 
mi) ( Glass, E. 

^ r, n > Centers .] Sublett 

Powell-Ballou I ( 

_ . \ { Gareissen 

^ oie ( Forwards 



Lay 

Thompson I { 

c, , v „ 1 ( Villepigue 

rr e | "-* N-* 

The Sigma yells were directed by Martha Best and Eunice Collier, 
and the Mus were led by Peggy Edmondson and "Cooley." Admir- 
able sportsmanship was shown by both associations in cheering as 
well as in playing. ± . x\ V . 

NoYember 27— Thanksgiying Day 

Thanksgiving Day at St. Mary's was fittingly begun by an early 
celebration of the Holy Communion, a voluntary service which was 
well attended. The regular Chapel Service was held at 10 :30,^ and 
Mr. Way preached a very appropriate sermon on the subject of giving 
thanks always for the things we have and not worrying over those 
we have not. 



^ The St. Mary's Muse 



Immediately after the service, the Seniors piled into three bi 
cars, and, chaperoned by Mr. Way and Miss Davis, set out for Chape 
Hill to see the Virginia-Carolina game. It was a lovely day fo 
riding and the outcome of the game, 6-0 in favor of Carolin 
was quite satisfactory, so it was a tired but happy bunch that set th 
echoes ringing in Senior Hall about nine o'clock that night. 

Meanwhile, those left behind had succeeded in having a very hupp* 
day, even without the Senior privilege of going to Chapel Hill ! Th. 
"spreads," for the most part, did not begin until the afternoon foj 
memories of past Thanksgiving dinners, and prophecies of future 
ones, combined to prevent feasting beforehand. And no one regretted 
the delay, for a five-course dinner, planned by Mrs. Marriott, might 
well fulfill the greatest expectations ! 

"Oh me, oh my, 
We had everything from soup to pie!" 

Not literally, of course, for we began with grapefruit and ended! 
with after-dinner coffee. It was a "purely excellent" dinner and 
the three cheers for Mrs. Marriott were given with a will. ' The 
dining-room was decorated with autumn leaves and lighted by little 
candles on each table, with apples for candlesticks, and a very pretty 
scene it was. 

The Thanksgiving offering was for the Thompson Orphanage 
and to supplement it, an imitation Vaudeville Show, an Auction Sale 
and a "Boy-and-Girl" Dance were held in the afternoon and evening 
Under the able leadership of Martha Best, and with Elizabeth 
Tucker at the piano, the Misses Blount, Smythe, Ballard, Hoyt, 
Lewis, Lasater, Buice and Mountcastle, gave a very good show— all 
the latest song hits, 'n everything! With "Cooley" as Auctioneer 
the success of the Sale was guaranteed, and a very creditable sum 
was cleared for the Orphanage. The Dance also, with Peggy Ed- 
mondson at the head, was a great success, the orchestra and the 
punch adding considerably to the general enjoyment. 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 



Noyenilber 29— The Class Parties 

The annual class parties, Seniors to the Sophomores and Juniors 
» the Freshmen, were given Saturday evening, November 29th. 

The Seniors entertained their sister class in the Muse Room with 
I novel spiderweb, carried out in the class colors, green and white, 
md orange and black. Each guest was given an "end" of the web, 
and at the word "Go !" the unweaving began. At the other end of 
\he ribbon was tied a little favor, a sweet-tuned whistle, a little gray 
mouse, or a wiggledy man that wouldn't lie down. When the spider- 
web was all untangled, the guests paired off for a contest, "The 
Romance of Millan and Nell," a romance in very truth, with blanks 
to be filled in with the Sophomore's names. The first prize was 
awarded to Misses Dennis and Alice Hughes, and the second to 
Elizabeth Carrigan and Catherine Boyd. Refreshments came next 
bn the program, consisting of tomato jelly with crackers, hot choco- 
late with "marshmallows on top" and little cakes. The party broke 
up at nine-thirty, and the teachers and Sophomores departed, each 
assuring the Seniors and everybody else that she had had a "lovely 
time !" 

A Baby Party, meanwhile, was in progress in the parlor. The 
Juniors, dressed as nurse maids, received their visitors at the door, 
the little boys and girls giving names of famous characters of history 
and fiction. Later in the evening George Washington, Robert 
E. Lee and Abraham Lincoln sang the "Star-Spangled Banner," 
Daniel Webster and Henry Clay debated against Patrick Henry and 
Billy Sunday, Paderewski directed a "Gym" class, Jack Pickford 
made love to Louise Huff, Galli-Curci sang, and other celebrities 
performed according to their various talents. "Little Virginia Har- 
rison" got the prize for pinning the tail on the rabbit. The "chil- 
dren" enjoyed the stick candy and animal crackers the nurses served 
them, and if they snitched a handful of little candy hearts, why, 
that's always done at children's parties ! 

The Preps, having no one to entertain them, entertained them- 
jselves in the "Gym" with a Tacky Party. In all the tackiness they 
could imagine and contrive on such short notice they appeared. Fun- 
niest, perhaps, were "Whedbee" and Martha Best, but the prize for 



26 The St. Mary's Muse 



the tackiest went to Loulie Fitts. The Preps' refreshments were 
appropriate, and very popular as well— apples, candy, chocolate 
teddy bears, and (sh-h, speak it softly) chewing gum! Tacky, 
wasn't it ? But then, you see, it was a Tacky Party ! 



December 6— The Mu Party to the Sigmas 

Eeturning the hospitality of the Sigmas last year, on Saturday 
evening, December 6th, the Mu Athletic Association entertained their 
Sigma sisters at a Christmas dance. All day there had been considerable 
bustling back and forth between the Muse Eoom and the Parlor, and 
forbidding "No admittance" signs on the doors had warned the 
curious that none were welcome without special invitation. The 
mystery was solved at lunch time when every Sigma found at her 
place at the table a little note inviting her to 

"A party in the parlor, Saturday night 
At eight fifteen. Come dressed in white!" 

Accordingly, the hall that night was crowded with girls all in 
white, and great was the excitement among them when the first crash 
from the Jazz Band gave the signal for the door to be flung open and 
the grand march to begin. The parlor as they entered presented a 
patriotic scene, which, however, soon resolved itself into streamers of 
red and white for the Sigmas, blue and white for the Mus, and red 
and green for Christmas. On both sides of the room little clothes pin 
dolls, dressed in the Sigma and Mu colors, hung suspended by white 
ribbon from a clothes line. In one corner stood a Christmas tree, 
the first of the season, laden with red and blue packages of candy! 
Just in front of the line stood Eleanor Sublett and Jane Euffin, 
holding literally a yard of regalias, from which Mary Bryan Wim- 
berly and Mary Yellott distributed one to each girl as she passed, 
red to a Sigma and blue to a Mu. In the course of the grand march 
the girls gathered the little clothes pin favors from the line, and 
before long the punch bowl claimed most of the marchers. 

Led by Marietta Gareissen, the Jazz Band provided excellent 
music throughout the evening. There were two Contest Dances, 
the first for the best Sigma and Mu dancing together, in which "Mr." 



The St. Mary's Muse 27 



Aiken and Miss Winiberly won the prize, and the second for the 
two best Sigmas, who, according to the judges' decision, were "Mr." 
Hines and Miss Anderson. Ice cream cones and candy were served, 
and the dancing went on with a vim until, as if by magic, it suddenly 
ceased, and the Sigmas melted, as it were, into one end of the room. 
Mary Hoke then briefly expressed their appreciation of the party, 
and, at a note from the piano, the whole association burst forth into 
song, assuring us that 

"Mu girls have got the ginger, 

Mu girls are hard to beat! 
Mu girls, we surely like you — 

We think you're peaches to give this treat. 
Sigmas, come let us hail them; 

Sigmas, we think they're fine! 
Sigmas and Mus are both good, 

At games and meets they are sure to shine!" 

The party broke up reluctantly at quarter of ten, the Sigmas bade 
the Mus goodnight, and a spirit of the friendliest good fellowship 
reigned among all. 

December 10-11— The Model Meetings 

Carrying out the literary society program as planned last spring, 
the E. A. P. and Sigma Lambda Societies held. "model meetings" 
in the parlor on the evenings of December 10th and 11th. As the 
name implies, the object of these meetings was to show how the thing 
should be done, attendance, order, and the general interest of the 
program being chiefly stressed. It was evident that both sides had 
expended much time and thought on their program, and it is seldom 
our good fortune to experience two such enjoyable evenings in the 
same week. 

The E. A. P.'s chanced to have drawn first place, which was re- 
garded as both an advantage and otherwise. As the Society is too 
large to have all taking part, thirty members were selected as a fan- 
representative of the whole. The President called the meeting to 
order in true parliamentary fashion at seven-twenty, and a hush fell 
upon the audience. The "business" proved of considerable interest 
to all, consisting in the report of a committee appointed to select 



28 The St. Mary's Muse 



music and words for an E. A. P. song. The chairman reported the 
selection of "the music composed by Miss Egleston and the words 
written by Miss Yellott." After a chorus had sung the song and it 
was duly approved by the Society, the following was presented by an 
all-star cast : 

Kipling, the Man and the Writer Mary Yellott 

"Tommy" Dorothy Kirtland 

"How the Camel Got His Hump" Millicent Blanton 

"Mother 0' Mine" Estelle Avent 

This concluded the evening's program and the meeting was officially 
adjourned. All that remained was to congratulate Jane Toy and 
her fellow officers on a model meeting which well deserved its name. 

Eivalry is running high between the two Societies, and there was 
a very evident spirit of excitement in the parlor on the following 
evening, the occasion of the Sigma Lambda meeting. Oddly enough, 
both Societies had hit upon the same subject for their program, 
Eudyard Kipling, but this rather added to than detracted from the 
interest of the second meeting. 
. After the roll call and reading of the minutes by the Secretary, 
the President called for reports from the various co mm ittees. A 
novelty was introduced in the reports on the current events of the 
week by Eugenia Thomas and Dorothy Baum. The following pro- 
gram was well rendered, but ran a little over time : 

Life of Rudyard Kipling Catharine Miller 

" If " Fielding Douthat 

Criticism of Kipling's Works Mildred Cooley 

"On the Road to Mandalay" Chorus 

"Wee Willie Winkie" Mary Louise Everett 

"Gunga Din" Crichton Thorne 

After the report of the critic, Lena Simmons, the meeting was 
adjourned, and the eyes and attention of all were focused on the 
judges, Miss Bottum, Miss Dennis, and Miss St. John. After but 
slight delay, they handed in their decisions, which proved to be two 
to one in favor of the E. A. P. Society. This is the second victory 
of the E. A. P.'s in the literary contest, and both sides have reentered 
the fray with renewed determination to win. 



The St. Mart's Muse 29 



"We Have Witt} Us Today" 

The Mu Team was greatly encouraged at the opening game, 
November 22d, by the cheering presence of Ellen Lay, star forward 
on the last year's team. She came over specially for the occasion, 
and returned to her work in Goldsboro, Sunday afternoon. Marian 
Drane was expected at the same time, but she did not arrive at St. 
Mary's until Sunday. She was on her way home from New York ; 
and stopped by only long enough to say, "Hello." 

Thanksgiving was the occasion of a general reunion at St. Mary's. 
The Seniors and older Old Girls were delighted to welcome back 
Novella Moye and Agnes Pratt, of the Class of 1918, and Bertha 
Albertson and Louise Toler, of 1919. "Ratty" Arbogast and Camilla 
McMullan paid us a brief visit, Camilla as the guest of Jane Turner. 
Sarah Eawlings and Josephine Erwin dropped in at odd moments, 
and Elizabeth Champion spent the week-end of November 23d with 
Lucy London Anderson. "Bep" Branson came over from Chapel 
Hill and spent the following week-end with Eleanor Sublett. Mar- 
garet Little was the guest of Helen Eoberson for Thanksgiving, and 
Hannah Townsend and Mary Pickett, friends of last year returned 
December 1st as the guests of Marietta Gareissen and Martha Best. 

Among the "sisters" who have recently visited at St. Mary's was 
Kathryn Keith, who spent the week-end of November 30th with Jesse, 
much to the evident delight of Muriel Dougherty. Lucille Miller, 
Edna Jones Nixon, Lucille Edwards, and Anna Long were also guests 
of their sisters around Thanksgiving time. 



Items of Interest 

On Thursday evening, November 20th, Mrs. Patterson gave a brief, 
but interesting and instructive, talk on the Balkan States. She wore 
the Serbian dress, and in her talk laid special emphasis on Serbia, its 
age as a nation, its present importance in world politics, and the 
many attractions of its Crown Prince ! She encouraged the study of 
languages, lamenting the average American traveler's ignorance of 
the languages demanded of a well educated person abroad. 



30 The St. Mary's Muse 



Carrying out the general plan of the Campaign, the Nation-wide 
Campaign Pageant was presented in the parlor Sunday evening, 
November 30th. The principal parts were taken by Mr. Stone, as 
the Lay Eeader; Mr. Jones, as the Priest; and Dorothy Kirtland, 
as the Spirit of the Nation-wide Campaign. The Pageant gave evi- 
dence of the thought expended on it by Katherine Batts and her 
assistant, Susan Collier, and it is to be hoped that it served its 
purpose. 

Mrs. Bickett made a short talk on the subject of Bed Cross Christ- 
mas Seals on Monday evening, December 1st. She described the 
work accomplished through the sale of these stamps in an interesting 
way, and we hope her suggestion that a stamp be placed on every 
Christmas present will be followed. 

^ The first of the series of musical attractions for the winter was 
given in the City Auditorium on Wednesday evening, December 3d. 
The combination of the name of John McCormack and the desire 
to "get out" took a great many of the St. Mary's girls to the concert, 
and all returned singing the praises of McCormack, and humming 
snatches from his most popular number, "Boses of Picardy." 

The Advent Mission Study Classes were opened Friday night, 
under the general direction of the Life Work Committee, of which 
Annie Duncan is the chairman. Catharine Miller and Nina Cooper 
are at the head of one class, and Catherine Boyd and Louise Boyd 
of the other. Both classes have been well attended, and reflect much 
credit on the leaders. 

There were three conflicting attractions for Saturday evening, 
December 6th. In addition to the Mu party to the Sigmas, the 
members of the choir were given the privilege of hearing the Great 
Lakes String Quartette at the Woman's Club, and Miss Davis chap- 
eroned her Expression pupils to a Eecital at Peace Institute. 

The every-member canvass of the Nation-wide Campaign was con- 
ducted at St. Mary's in an orderly and systematic manner by the 
members of the Junior Auxiliary Council on Sunday afternoon, 
December 7th. The girls as a whole showed deep interest in the 
Campaign, and the introduction of the duplex envelope system will 
doubtless insure its financial success at St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



31 



The first of the Peace-St. Mary's Concert Series was the occasion 
of considerable excitement in the St. Mary's Auditorium on Tues- 
day evening, December 9th, when, assembled for a concert by the 
Tollefsen Trio, the combined student bodies of Peace and St. Mary's 
almost overflowed the building. The program was rather long but, 
on the whole, very enjoyable. 

The Muse acknowledges with thanks the following Exchanges: 
The Wake Forest Student, the Greensboro Coraddi, The Lenoirian, 
The College of Charleston Magazine, The Trinity Archive, the Mere- 
dith College Acorn, the Winston-Salem News, and The Deaf Caro- 
linian. 




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The St. Mary's Muse 

MID-WINTER NUMBER 



Vol. XXV January 1920 No. 4 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by The Sigma Lambda Literary Society 

Editors 

Mary Moffitt Catharine Miller 

Lucy London Anderson 



The New Year 

Hennie Long, '22 

The white moon mounted high 
And from a cold, clear sky, 
Down, on a village nigh, 
Shed silvery light. 
Earth slumbered sweet and well. 
Then, rang a soft-toned bell; 
Followed, a chorus knell — 
Th' Old Year took flight. 

Then came the New Year in, 

Her new work to begin, 

Ushered with joyful din 

By the clear bells. 

Her coming gave the earth 

Repenting, a rebirth, 

And so, with boisterous mirth, 

Her joy she tells. 



The St. Mart's Muse 



Peg arjd the Prince 

Katherine Waddell, '22 

"O the snow, the beautiful snow, 
Covering fields and hedges helow," 

softly misquoted Peg, as she stood with her face pressed against the 
window pane, gazing on the quiet back alley that composed the view 
of ISTew York seen from her hall bedroom window. 

"I have never seen anything so beautiful and white before in all 
my life. Isn't it just too wonderful for words, Em?" turning to 
her roommate and bosom friend. She received no response, for 
Emily was deeply engaged in reading a book with a bright yellow 
cover, which bore the interesting and enlightening title of "A Bride 
for a Day." Peg turned back to the window. 

All was quiet in the dark little room for the space of fifteen min- 
utes. A quiet that was disturbed only by the thumping and bump- 
ing of a stone-cold radiator, whose business, it seemed, was to make 
a racket, rather than to give off heat. Emily ate apples and wept 
over the sorrows of deserted Genevieve, while Peg watched the snow- 
flakes and dreamed. 

A loud knock on the door broke the stillness and, in answer to 
Emily's invitation, a fat, gum-chewing woman of uncertain age 
stumbled into the room and set a big wooden box on the floor. 

"It's for you, Miss Peg," she announced loudly. "I seen it settin' 
in the hall, so I brought it up." She regarded the object of these 
remarks with open curiosity. 

"Oh, thank you, Mrs. Holder!" Peg ran to get a hammer from 
the dark recesses of a small closet in the farther corner of the room. 
"I know what it is" — she emerged, triumphant, with the hammer in 
her hand. "It is some picture frames for my latest masterpieces !" 

"Well, Miss Peg, you sure are a fine artist. Your pitchers are 
some swell." 

"Yes, they are wonderful," Peg laughed scornfully. "I am cer- 
tainly one of the greatest wonders of the world, and my paintings 
are things of beauty, and — " 



The St. Mary's Muse 



"Now, Peg," her roommate interrupted, "don't get bitter. Your 
paintings are good, but you can't expect them to be recognized and 
exhibited the very first year you are in New York." 

"I don't expect it the first year, or the second — or the third, for 
that matter,"— she was pulling out nails with vigor and loosening 
boards. "Thank you so much, Mrs. Holder," to the retreating figure 
of that worthy personage— "or ever," she completed gloomily. 

"Why, darling, that isn't like you at all ! Why are you so down- 
hearted all of a sudden ? You always see the bright side of things. 
I don't understand. What's the matter ?" besought Emily, anxiously. 
"Oh, I was just thinking. You know, at home, everybody nice 
goes with everybody else nice, but here there is a line drawn between 
the poor and the nice, and I'm on the wrong side of the line. Oh, it's 
dreadful to be poor !" 

"Why, Peg, I thought you were perfectly contented with your lot, 
and wouldn't be one of the Idle Kich for anything !" 

"Well, I wouldn't ; but I'm just blue. Today, while I was at lunch 
at Grady's, I saw a big gray car at the curb, and in it was the most 
beautiful girl I have ever seen — dressed all in velvet and furs. She 
looked like a princess — golden hair, white skin, and beautiful, use- 
less white hands. And with her was a prince — or he could pass for 
one—tall, dark, handsome and— wonderful ! Of course, I'll probably 
never see him again, and I don't care, but it makes me furious to be 
in the same place with people, nice people you'd like to know, and 
then you can't — " 

"Oh, Peg, Peg ! You adorable little nut !" Peg was smothered 
in a bear-like embrace, hammer, wrapping-paper and all. "You 
have fallen for the prince, as you call him, and you are blaming it on 
the world. You little simpleton !" 

In vain Peg protested and denied. Emily was all unbelieving, but 
altogether sympathetic and thrilled with the romance of it. 

"Love at first sight," she laughed, delightedly. "I'll bet you flirted 
outrageously. Now, 'fess up!" 

"Why, he didn't even see me, goose," Peg denied indignantly. 
But Emily smiled incredulously. "You can't fool me, Peg. I know 
you too well," she said. 



The St. Maky's Muse 



Peg didn't deign to answer this remark. Throwing down the 
hammer, she returned to her window. Emily, seeing that a confi- 
dence was not forthcoming, resumed her book, which she had left at 
a very exciting point, the heroine being in the arms of the hero. 

Once more, quiet reigned over all. 

"Yes ? Who is it ?" Everett Keston rattled the telephone receiver 
irritably. "What the deuce— Hello ! Oh, that's you, is it, Helen ? 
I've been trying to get you all afternoon. It sure is sweet of you to 
call up. Oh, dinner tonight ? Eine. I say, have you an engage- 
ment for this afternoon? How about going to the Metropolitan? 
There's a big art exhibit on, and everybody's going. Four-thirty? 
All right, I'll see you then. Good-bye." He put down the receiver 
with a bang. 

"Br-r-r-r, how I hate this cold weather," he muttered, as he but- 
toned his overcoat and pulled his hat down over his eyes, preparatory 
to going out. 

It was at the art exhibit that afternoon that Everett first saw her. 
She wore a bright red sweater with a dark skirt, and a red tarn half 
hid her towseled curls. Her bright color and sparkling eyes made 
her seem like a mischievous spirit, as she stood looking up at a famous 
Eembrandt. What a contrast she was to Helen, this vivid slip of 
a girl in her flaming scarlet. Helen, tall, stately, and remotely supe- 
rior, stood just where the sunlight painted a halo about her golden 
head. Only half interested in the works of art about her, she idly 
watched the restless streams of people. Everett had just been look- 
ing at her, his promised bride, and thinking how beautiful she was, 
for all her coldness, when he heard a laughing voice exclaim softly, 
"Oh, Em, the prince !" 

He turned, but all he saw was two girls gazing absorbedly at 

a Eembrandt. 

"What a pretty girl," he thought, "and what a perfect profile !" 
At this minute Helen turned to greet some friends, so Everett 

wandered over in the direction of the Eembrandt. He wanted to see 



The St. Mary's Muse 



if the girl's face came up to the profile. Stopping near the two girls 
he coughed softly, and rattled the guide book in his hand ; but all to 
no avail — the profile remained a profile. 

"Do you like the painting ?" he ventured at last. "It certainly is 
a fine one." 

The two girls turned simultaneously, and he faced heroically the 
battery of blue and brown eyes, the latter set in the lovely, vivacious 
face of Peg Rutledge. 

"The profile hasn't even a showing!" Everett thought, while he 
wildly tried to think of something to say. "Rembrandt is a fine old 
fellow," he began glibly, but stopped short. This evidently wasn't 
the way to do it. The brown eyes sparkled with laughter, and Emily 
giggled faintly. "Yes," she said, sobering quickly. "He is a friend 
of my father's. He certainly is a fine old chap." 

"Oh, I say," Everett felt himself becoming red. 

"So do I," interrupted Emily. "By the way, are you any kin to 
the Prince of Wales ?" 

"Oh, Em!" deprecated a small voice, and Peg smiled. Everett 
recognized at once the voice that had said, "Oh, Em, the prince!" 
He felt that now he had the advantage, so he recovered his composure 
and began again. 

"I suppose the best way to go about it," he smiled the smile that 
had captured many hearts, "is to introduce myself. I am Everett 
Eeston, dealer in thoroughbred horses, bird dogs — and Stutz racers," 
he added whimsically. 

Em immediately became mistress of the situation. "I am charmed 
to meet you," she said cordially. "I am Emily Elesmere, and this 
is Margaret Rutledge, commonly known as Peg." 

"Peg," thought Everett, "suits her to a T." 

Peg smiled again, and gave him her hand, half shyly. 

"Isn't the exhibit splendid!" Em exclaimed, enthusiastically. 
"When I become a great artist, I shall have my masterpiece hung 
right here, where the light will strike it, and all the critics who see 
it will say, 'How wonderful!' and the fashionable ladies will stop 
under it, and talk about Mrs. Brown's new hat. We are artists," 
she explained to Everett, adding laughingly, "in name only, I fear." 



6 The St. Mart's Muse 



"You, too ?" he turned to Peg, increasing interest in his eyes. She 
nodded. 

"Let's look at Flandler's latest artistic attempt," suggested Em. 
Thus began a long ramble around the big room. They examined 
a painting here and there, but Emily did most of the talking. Peg 
was unusually quiet, and Everett, for some reason he could not have 
explained, couldn't think of much that needed to be said. 

The late sunlight was slanting through a western window when Em, 
glancing at her wrist watch, suddenly exclaimed, "Why, how late it 
is. Almost everybody has gone !" 

Everett turned quickly to look for Helen, but of course, she was 
gone, undoubtedly with rage in her heart. 

"Come, Peg, we must be going. We'll be late for dinner if we 
don't hurry." Emily pulled on her gloves and buttoned her coat. 

"I certainly have enjoyed the afternoon, Miss Rutledge, thanks 
to you," Everett extended his hand. He looked for a perilous instant 
into the brown eyes, then turned away. 

"Oh, Peg," exclaimed Emily, as soon as they were out on the street, 
"he is just crazy about you ! You look darling in that red tarn, and 
I don't blame him one bit !" 

"Isn't he wonderful, Em ? I think he is the best looking man I 
have ever seen!" She raised sparkling eyes to her friend's face. 

"But, do you know what I think, honey % I bet anything he didn't 
intend to leave that Grecian goddess of his for us — and won't she be 
mad ? Whew ! I don't exactly envy him when her wrath descends 
upon him." 

In the meanwhile, Everett was vainly endeavoring to recall why he 
had left Helen's side in the first place. Of course, she was furious — 
and who could blame her ? What should he do ? 

It was beginning to snow, and the leaden sky predicted more snow 
before the night was over. Everett pulled his hat low over his eyes 
and turned toward the Elevated. He'd have it out with her, right 
away. She couldn't do more than return his ring — and if she didn't 
love him enough to forgive him, he was willing to end everything! 



The St. Mary's Muse 



There were other girls in the world — . His mind followed this train 
of thought until he rang the door bell of a pretentious stone house on 
a pretentious street. 

"Miss Farley isn't receiving callers this evening," the butler coldly 
informed him. 

"Oh, I say," Everett began, but stopped abruptly. "What's the 
use ?" he muttered and turned again to the street. As he made his 
way toward his down-town apartment, his mind was filled with half 
worried, half relieved thoughts. Of course he loved Helen — or was 
it love ? He certainly thought she was the most beautiful girl he had 
ever seen, and he had expected to marry her since their school days. 
And yet, he had always considered it a rather one-sided affair; she 
was so cold and unresponsive. 

John let him into his cheerful apartment and relieved him of his 
overcoat. 

"Here are some papers for you, sir," he said, "and here are a letter 
and a package a boy just brought." 

Everett ignored the papers, but hastily tore open the letter. It 
was written on plain white stationery, and about it hung the faint 
odor of violets that he always associated with Helen. 

He read : "After the way you acted this afternoon, I feel that it is 
impossible to continue on the same terms with you. Please do not 
try to mend what is forever shattered. I am returning your ring. 
Helen." 

"She never really loved me, anyhow," Everett said slowly, as he 
slipped the little package into his pocket. "Well, that ends one 
episode of my life." 

"Oh, Em, it's the prince again — Look ! I do believe he is com- 
ing in here !" Peg excitedly disregarded the menu and rummaged 
in her bag for her Dorine. 

"The Grecian goddess isn't with him, this time. I don't suppose 
they are on speaking terms now. I don't blame her much, though," 
Em said thoughtfully, one eye on the menu and one on the door. 

Everett came hurriedly into the cafe and stopped short in well 
simulated surprise when he saw the two girls. 



The St. Mart's Muse 



"Well, this is a pleasant surprise !" he exclaimed, although he had 
seen them go in, and had followed on their heels as soon as he could 
get away from the business acquaintance with whom he was talking. 

"May I order the lunch ?" he asked, and immediately took posses- 
sion of the menu card, and in spite of their protests, ordered such 
a meal as Peg hadn't eaten since the Rutledges were wealthy and 
good living abounded in the old Southern home. 

"How about a ride out into the country ?" Everett suggested, when 
the last vestige of the delectable pastry had vanished, and the waiter 
had presented the bill. 

"Oh, Peg, why not ? We haven't been in the country since last 
summer, and this is such a wonderful spring day !" Emily was all 
enthusiasm. 

Peg shook her head regretfully. 

"I'm awfully sorry, Mr. Reston," she said, "but I have this after- 
noon all planned, and I have lots of work that I must do, as much as 
I'd like to ride on such a lovely day." 

"I say, I sure am sorry. That's hard luck, for me, at any rate." 

As they moved toward the door, Everett vainly tried to think of 
something to say or do that would prolong the interview, but Peg 
forestalled him by extending a small hand, when they reached the 
door. 

"I am so glad I saw you," she smiled up at him," and I'm awfully 
sorry I can't accept your invitation." 

"Me, too," chimed in Emily, forgetful of grammar and manners. 
"Maybe, next time," she suggested smilingly. 

"Sure," he agreed. "There is always a next time, and it must be 
soon." He held the door open for them. "Can't I take you home 
in my car ?" 

"No, thanks. We are not going home now," Peg refused quickly, 
before her companion could accept. Em looked at her in astonish- 
ment. "Why, I thought — " she began, but a quick pinch on her arm 
stopped her. 

As the two girls walked homeward in the warm spring sunlight. 
Em took Peg by the arm and gave her a little shake. 



The St. Mary's Muse 9 

"You goose/' she scolded, "why didn't you go to ride with him? 
Seems to me you would have jumped at the chance." 

"Oh, Em, I couldn't," Peg protested. "I know he asked us just 
because he has had a fuss with the Goddess, and he's just trying to 
pique her. I won't be a second fiddler, so there !" 

"Well, I should judge from the way he looked at you that you were 
the one and only girl in the world for him, but, then, you always were 
obstinate." 

"O Peg, come to the phone, quick !" Emily called excitedly from 
the foot of the stairs. "It's the prince, and you've just got to come 
and talk to him !" 

Peg appeared on the top step, looking as adorable as only she could 
look. Above the pink artist's smock, her cheeks were flushed, her 
hair tumbled, and her eyes were bright with excitement. 

"Em, I just can't talk to him ! I know if I do, I'll give in, and 
I mustn't do that. You know I mustn't," she pleaded. 

"Well, I don't see why," her friend insisted. "This is the forty- 
'leventh time he has called up, and I think it is absurd for you to 
treat him so horrid. If he cared two snaps about that girl he would 
have gone back to her weeks ago. Come on and talk to him, there's 
a dear !" But Peg was obdurate. 

"You can tell him that I am going away tomorrow, and I am busy 
packing," and with that she returned to her room, where all was in 
chaos, such as only a girl can make when she is packing. Emily went 
despondently back to the phone, to tell the impatient Everett that Peg 
was getting ready to go home, and was too busy to come to the 
telephone. 

"Going home ! Not for good ?" he shouted, frantically. 

"Not so loud," Emily protested. "I'm not deaf ! Yes, for good, 
I guess, unless she comes back for a visit. She's given up art, you 
know, and she is done with New York. Nice of me, to tell you all of 
her aifairs, but I guess you are interested." 

"Ask her if I can come to the station to tell her good-bye," he 
begged. "When does she leave ?" 



10 The St. Mary's Muse 



The next morning found Peg seated in the chair car of a Dixie- 
bound train. She was surrounded on all sides by suit-cases, maga- 
zines, and boxes of candy. 

Everett took her hand and looked pleadingly into her eyes, but she 
looked quickly away and withdrew her hand. 

"Good-bye, Em dear," she said, turning to her faithful friend. 
"Write to me often, and tell me all about your successes. I am sure 
you are going to be a famous artist yet, and I shall be proud of you." 

"Good-bye, you little darling. You don't know how much I am 
going to miss you." 

"She is so dear and brave," Emily faltered, looking after the 
departing train with tears in her eyes. "Who'd ever know that she 
is heart-broken because her painting is a failure, and she can't have 
her career." 

Everett's own heart was heavy as they walked away from the sta- 
tion. "She's the sweetest little girl that ever lived," he said, none 
too steadily. 

The summer months passed slowly for Everett. He wrote to Peg 
several times, but received no reply. He saw Emily often, and she 
told him that Peg was well and happy in her old home, where she 
loved everybody, and everybody loved her. "But I know she misses 
New York," Emily told him one day. "She never says so, in so 
many words, but I can tell just from the tone of some of her letters." 

"Well, New York isn't the same old place without her," he said, 
wistfully. "Do you suppose she is coming back ?" 

"She never says anything about it, but I am always hoping she will. 
She said, once, that she would surely come if one of my pictures 
should, by any happy chance, be presented at the Metropolitan, so 
I am working harder than ever." 

The drowsy summer days shortened, and soon the air became crisp, 
and the sunshine more mellow. Autumn came, and with it the fall 
exhibit at the Metropolitan. 

Everett went to the exhibit, though his only interest in it was on 
Em's account. At first he avoided the spot where the Kembrandt 



The St. Mary's Muse 11 

had hung, that winter day so long ago, but it drew hirn irresistibly. 
As he neared the well-loved spot, a flash of scarlet met his astonished 
gaze! He felt an impulse to rub his eyes. It couldn't be true! 
It couldn't be — but it was ! In the very same spot where he had first 
seen her, stood a girl in a red sweater and dark skirt. She wore 
a red tarn that half hid a mass of tumbled brown curls. She and the 
girl with her were looking up at a painting which hung just where the 
light struck it. 

"I am so happy for you, Em," said the sweet, soft voice of Peg 
Eutledge. "It is your dream realized, isn't it ? It's hanging right 
in the spot you said you wanted it. Doesn't that last exhibit seem 
ages ago \ Your future is mapped out, and I'm so glad, glad, glad !" 

"Yes," said Em, with a little catch in her voice. "The wonder of 

it almost chokes me. I am going to live for my art for its own sake, 

as well as for the fame it will bring me — if I dare to hope for fame." 

Peg took her friend's hand. "I know you'll get it, dear, and 

you deserve it as much as anybody ever did." 

"Do you like the painting?" a voice full of suppressed emotion 
interrupted them. The two girls turned simultaneously. 

"Oh, Everett Eeston," exclaimed Em, "how you frightened me !" 
but Peg — Peg didn't say a word. Everett took both her small hands 
in his own, and looked down at the face of the girl he loved. 

Emily turned away quickly, and looked out of the window with 
moist eyes. How long they might have stood there it is impossible to 
say, had not Em recovered her presence of mind and suggested 
a stroll around the room. There were many beautiful paintings on 
exhibit, but they were sadly neglected that afternoon. 

At last the trio stopped in front of a western window, near a bust 
of Aristotle. It was here that kind-hearted Em left them, her heart 
singing over the happiness of her friend. 

"Little girl," Everett took Peg's hand, "you'll never know how 
I have missed you!" 

"I — I've missed you, too." The soft color flooded her face and 
then — but what happened then only wise old Aristotle saw, and he 
didn't tell. 



12 The St. Mart's Muse 



The sun had vanished behind a bank of rose and gold clouds, leav- 
ing a faint pink glow over all the sky, when they awoke to the fact 
that the room was deserted except for an occasional straggler here 
and there. 

"Are you happy ?" Everett asked softly. 

"Oh, so happy," Peg sighed. "I have my Prince at last !" 

"Little Princess of my heart," he murmured. 

Peg, looking like a real fairy princess in the sunset's glow, took 
her prince by the hand. 

"Come, let's go tell Em," she said. 



Trje ValeQtiQe Cure 

Crichton Thorne, '23 

Janie Ruth staggered with upturned face in the direction of the 
little brown schoolhouse on the hill. Her coat, that Mother had so 
carefully buttoned about her slim little figure, now clamped under 
one arm, trailed along behind her, jerkily catching and dropping the 
fallen pine needles beneath her feet. The strap of her blue book-bag 
was at intervals shifted to the other shoulder, and this alone seemed to 
remind Janie Ruth of the existence of material things. She was 
ever a strange child — "a queer mixture of day-dreamer and warm- 
heartedness," as her Aunt Betty had appropriately put it. 

On this smiling February morning two particularly great interests 
absorbed Janie Ruth's thoughts and mingled themselves with the 
vague impression that her footsteps were belated. These were the facts : 
today was St. Valentine's and yesterday Walter White had raised 
her to a pinnacle of fame by presenting her with the biggest, reddest 
apple Janie Ruth had ever seen — just such an apple as one remem- 
bers having discovered in the toe of one's stocking at Christmas-time 
and dipping for in tubs of water at Hallowe'en. 

Janie Ruth was a stranger in the little town of ISTewbern, Alabama. 
She seemed just to have dropped there, and as a delicate flower has 
more difficulty in taking root, so had Janie Ruth experienced the 



The St. Mary's Muse 13 

pangs of bitter out-of-placeness. The first grade children in the little 
brown schoolhouse had greeted her curiously though cordially, and 
then had forgotten the lonesome-looking little stranger sitting three 
seats from the back. They had noticed she was shy and quiet and 
ever gazing wonderingly out of the window. Nothing ever seemed to 
disturb her peaceful attitude and they took it for granted that Janie 
Ruth was not of them. 

But Janie Ruth, despite her abstraction, had noticed in turn that 
Anna Bell, owning the front seat and yellow hair, was quite partial 
to Walter White, and so seemed the other little beings that sat alert 
and fidgety in their crisp ginghams. The fact that Walter White 
had several times passed a yellow bag across the aisle to Anna Bell 
had not escaped the dreamy observation of Janie Ruth and several 
times she had wondered why all the girls got caught when he was "it." 
But such things had been only secondary in the thoughts of Janie 
Ruth until yesterday, when the paper bag had traveled down the row 
and landed on her desk with a terminating thud. She had ducked 
her head and become suddenly frightened, and painfully conscious 
that by so doing she was dodging the daggers Anna Bell was staring 
at her. Upon gaining the courage, she lifted her head and gazed 
again at the tufts of trees against the sky, as though Walter White 
showed such deference to her daily. 

Recess came and Janie Ruth's popularity had visibly increased. 
Little flocks of her prior-distant schoolmates crowded around her for 
a "bite" with shyly admiring glances. Surely Janie Ruth was pretty 
or smart or something, if she had succeeded in directing Walter 
White's affections in a different channel. 

The supple little body of Anna Bell appeared, legs first, from the 
schoolhouse porch and approached the little group near the side 
fence. "You're eatin' that ol' apple jes' like it's sour!" 

Anna Bell put her arm affectionately around the waist of Sarah 
Lee and whispered audibly, "Walter White asked me to have that 
apple yesterday evening, an' I tol' him I hated sour apples. Don't 
you hate sour apples, Sarah Lee ?" Ten astonished pairs of wide 
eyes turned on Anna Bell as the name of the first grade hero slipped 
thus lightly into the little circle. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 



But Janie Kuth was the new heroine of the first grade as now 
became evident. Silence brooded, then Sarah Lee lisped inquiringly, 
"Doith Walter all-time bring you thour appleth, Anna Bell ?" The 
thought struck Janie Kuth as funny and she threw back her head and 
laughed. She stopped suddenly, however, for Anna Bell was glaring 
at her with an unwavering glare. Her snapping blue eyes glittered 
fire and the lunch had dropped from her fisted right hand. There 
were no two ways about it — one angle of the eternal triangle was 
suffering the pangs of jealousy. 

A great lump rose in Janie Ruth's throat. Her very heart quiv- 
ered for a second- — then with full, surprising force she returned the 
deadly gaze of Anna Bell. They were enemies, sworn enemies, 
enemies to the bitter end. 

That was only yesterday, but on her way to school the knowledge of 
possessing a sworn enemy disturbed but little the tranquil and dreamy 
Janie Ruth. 

"Why are you late, dearie ?" Miss Nancy's pleasant tones gently 
remonstrated. 

"I — I — it smells so good out doors. D-doesn't it, Teacher % And, 
please, I didn't come very fast, I reckon." Miss Nancy nodded and, 
as if from force of habit, added another "T" to the numerous T's by 
Janie Ruth's name. 

Janie Ruth passed Anna Bell's desk and met her malignant eyes 
with seeming indifference. Then dropping into her seat she turned 
to her page of Nature and studied through the window for several 
intense minutes. 

"Children, this afternoon we are going to deliver our Valentines. 
Walter White will be the postman, so you must all mail your Valen- 
tines in this box on my desk. Remember to write on each one the 
name of the person you are sending it to. Janie Ruth, are you pay- 
ing attention?" 

Janie Ruth dropped from the clouds, passed the lazy bird wheeling 
in the radiant blue, and found her voice to answer, "Yes'm, Valen- 
tines." She herself had cut out a rather deformed heart and printed 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 



on it "To Teacher." She felt a comfortable sense of duty done, and 
gazed out again in the warm spring sunlight until the bell rang for 



recess. 



The little box on Teacher's desk was jammed and crammed 
to overflowing. Janie Kuth's only interest in the affair was the 
wrinkled paper heart somewhere in its profound depths, bearing the 
nearly illegible "To Teacher." Her interest suddenly broadened as 
Walter White, wearing a gray cadet cap three sizes too large for him 
and with a book-bag banging from his sturdy young shoulder, ap- 
proached the desk and emptied the Valentines into his bag. Teacher 
and pitch-pipe came forward. "La-a-a," sang the pitch-pipe. "Ready, 

children ?" 

"0 letter man in suit of gray, 
I want a letter, please, today. 
You know the house in which I live 
So will you not a letter give?" 

Passers-by might have mistaken the treble chorus for "Maryland, 
My Maryland," but how beautifully the words suited the actions of 
the first grade hero ! 

Janie Ruth, meanwhile, became uncomfortable. Why, she didn't 
quite like to reason out ; only she was certain that Anna Bell would 
smile victoriously in her direction when the "letter man in suit of 
gray" had piled her desk with distorted hearts and love messages, 
utterly ignoring the lonesome-looking desk third from the back. Her 
eyes for once forgot the window and her head fell on her arms. 

Distantly the chorus sounded — 

"0 Valentine, Saint Valentine, 
He was a dear old friend of mine" — 

Then something lightly touched her hair and slipped to the desk. 
Scarce daring to hope, she raised her head. Janie Ruth had a Val- 
entine ! With trembling fingers she opened the carefully folded slip 
of drawing paper. Inside were two hearts, one a chubby little heart, 
the other tall and thin. Her sparkling eyes painfully deciphered 
the words, "Love me little ; love me long. Walter White." 



16 The St. Mart's Muse 

That afternoon Janie Kuth lightly tripped with upturned face and 
triumphant brow in the direction of home, her book-bag holding the 
precious Valentine pressed close to her throbbing heart. Anna Bell 
was waiting on the stile near the big pine as Janie Ruth came to 
climb over. She was below Janie Ruth's notice. 

"Going home, Janie Ruth? Let's go by the gin and cut off the 
Brown's corner. I go that-a-way 'most every day." 

Anna Bell took naturally Janie Ruth's free arm and the latter 
responded civilly, "I cert'ny do want to go that way, Anna Bell. 
How'd you find it ?" And why shouldn't she answer civilly ? Was 
not the world, and all that there is in it, her very own ? 

This favor of disclosing a newly-found path was basis enough for 
friendship and Anna Bell was the more zealous builder. 

"You know, I like you, Janie Ruth, an' I was jes' funnying 'bout 
Walter White askin' me to have that apple. He does like me best, 
though, 'cause he's known me lots the longes' and he's my beau." 

A thrill of secret triumph rose beneath the Valentine pressed 
against Janie Ruth. She hastened to change the subject. A feel- 
ing akin to pity for her defeated rival softened Janie Ruth to answer, 
"Anna Bell, would you like to wear my Chinese beads home with 



you 



2" 



"Oh yes," replied the friendly Anna Bell, "and you can wear my 
silver ring. You see those two hands holdin' each other— they mean 
frien'ship fr'ever." 

Behind the gin the path forked. Lengthening shadows and a crim- 
son west reminded the happy little pair that at home mothers were 
impatiently awaiting their return. 

"Janie Ruth, if — if you'll 'cross your heart and hope to die' you 
won't tell, I'll — I reckon I'll show you a Valentine the letter man 
gave me." 

Janie Ruth would keep silent till death. Anna Bell dived in her 
book-bag and opened a carefully folded piece of drawing paper. 
"From Walter White," she chirped, then, soothingly, "You see, he's 
been knowing me so much longer." 

The two familiar little hearts on the Valentine smiled up at Janie 
Ruth. A tiny pang rose within her, but was straightway crushed by 



The St. Mary's Muse 17 

the thought of having made two brand new friends. "Love me little ; 
love me long," it read. The two girls kissed each other goodnight, 
and the secretive Janie Ruth turned down the rambling little lane 
leading home. Her gaze no longer wandered in the clouds, but her 
warm heart beat fast, rich in the love for two new friends and a neatly 
folded Valentine. 



'Possun) Huntir)' 

Crichton Thorne, '23 

When de frost has kissed de 'simmons 
And de leaves has all turned brown, 

When de Autumn nights is chilly 
And de large, white stars stare down; 

When de hounds, a-huntin' rabbits, 
Can be heard for miles about, 

An' a moon through empty branches 
Of a bare tree shimmahs out. 

Den dat's 'possum huntin' weather — 
Dem's de symptoms good an' strong. 

All yo' need's er axe an' lantern 
An' to call yo' dawgs along. 

Ain't yo' been a-'possum huntin'? 

Honey, den dere's somethin' mo' 
To be added to yo' pleasures 

As yo' seek 'em heah below. 

Fer a 'possum hunt in Autumn 
When de harvest fields is cleah 

Comes nigh garnerin' yo' harvest 
Of de pleasures of de yeah. 

You've a feelin' dat's nigh holy 
When yo' blue-dawg trees fer true, 

An' dar hangs ol' Mistah 'Possum, 
Scared an' grinnin' down at you. 

But de sweetes' pa't's just huntin' 
In de night dat's cold an' still, 

An' yo' heah yo' blue-dawg's barkin' 
Echo 'way off on de hill. 



18 The St. Maby's Muse 



A Rainbow Romance 

Fielding Doijthat, '22 

It was not the scene of a romance, this murky walled dining-room, 
with its long table and soiled cloth and its odor of boarding-house 
breakfast mingled with the odor of many other such breakfasts gone 
before. Nor was it a romantic crew seated around the table, busily 
attentive to the work in hand, namely, that of swallowing with the 
greatest possible speed the food set before them. A damp wind 
coming in from a damp side street napped the pepless curtains and 
knocked back and forth the odors of coffee, bacon and eggs ; knocked 
them right into the faces of the poor unfortunate boarders, as if the 
silly wind was trying to assist the thoroughly capable looking Mrs. 
Gummy by making her boarders think they had had something to eat 
even if they had not. To a casual onlooker it would seem that every 
person at the table was fully consistent with the room, the odors, the 
spotted cloth and all. 

There was Mrs. Gummy at the foot, fat and untidy, pouring the 
coffee, and an empty seat at her right which denoted that her niece, 
Fanny Alice, had not arrived. Then there was that old relic, Col. 
Lawdon, burrowing his whiskers in the morning paper, and the young 
shoe clerk, Harold Fitzgerald, running a race with Miss Delphenia 
Spinny to see which could consume the most in the least time and 
catch the 7:45 to their respective places of business. And so on, 
down the long line of every day personages that filled the table. 

It is in this setting that our heroine will first appear. Fanny 
Alice arrived breathlessly, sticking the last hairpin in her tangled 
yellow mop and cramming a powder puff in the front of her blouse. 
Eouged, powdered, arrayed in a georgette waist and grimy woolen 
skirt, and chewing gum, she betook herself to her chair and flopped 
down upon it. She cast her eyes in the direction of Mr. Fitzgerald 
and remarked, "Good morning, everybody." 

The Colonel was the first to give back the answering good morn- 
ing. He always was. The others invariably held back, waiting for 
him without quite realizing it. This morning as usual he raised his 
whiskers from the paper and said, "Good morning. You look as 



The St. Mary s Muse 19 



bright as a May morning today/' and returned his whiskers to the 
paper. Then the others dutifully chirped good morning and fell to 
work again, except that Mrs. Gummy found time to say, "I sure be 
sick and tired o' seem' you wear thet waist every day." This was 
an unfortunate remark. 

"Well, what else could I wear, will you tell me % This is the only 
georgette I got, and the firm of Besse & Clesse is too nifty a place 
to put up with clerks dressed in one o' those poor cotton ones." 
"Oh, it ain't the waist I'm objecting to. I jest likes variety." 
This fact had never occurred to Fanny Alice before and it cut 
deep. As long as she wore a silk waist she could not see why she 
was not dressed in the most elegant style. Knowing this, however, 
she could no longer go to work in peace. Her brain seethed in her 
eager search for a scheme. She had never before lacked ingenuity, 
but this morning it failed her. 

"Well, what shall I do ?" she wailed to the table at large. 
Many suggestions followed, but as all of them held the idea of 
a new one as a basis, Fanny Alice powdered her nose violently in 
despair, for every cent that she made went to Mrs. Gummy and 
forthwith disappeared. 

The old Colonel rattled his paper and the table fell silent — the 
Colonel was going to make a suggestion. He sucked the ends of his 
moustache for a minute and looked very wise. Then his watery 
eyes lit up and narrowed in a smile. "Why not dye it?" he 
murmured. 

There was a rising rumble of approval and "Why not dye it V 
piped up Mr. Fitzgerald, wiggling his bandolened head at his 
originality. 

"Oh, great! That's what I'll do. I'm here to tell you, you hit 
the big idea that time !" exulted Fanny Alice. 

And thus began the tragedy. It happened that evening when 

Fanny Alice came trudging home in the foggy twilight, anxious to 

reach Mrs. Gummy's warm dining-room, that a little negro boy, the 

proud porter of a neighboring drug store, came running up to her. 

"Dis heah is fer you, Miss Fanny. I'd be bledged if you'd tek it." 

Eagerly she tore off the paper. What could it be ? 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 



a O-o-o, a package of dj^—pink! Well, who—" She did not 
know who was so thoughtful, but her heart beat high with a faint 
fluttering hope and through the gray mist gleamed a smooth black 
head and the shine of a flashy scarf pin. 

She put the question to the table that night. They all looked 
innocent. However, after that Fanny Alice and her dyed shirt- 
waist became the pet conversation of the boarders. They soon 
wearied of the pink, which by the way, turned out a great success, 
and expressed their various preferences as to the prospects of another 
color— variety, as Mrs. Gummy said quite often, being the spice of 
life. 

Mr. Fitzgerald was strong for lavendar. The Colonel said that 
lavendar was all right, but was loud in the praises of yellow. Mrs. 
Gummy argued that red was by far the most serviceable color and 
that anything else would be mere "torn fool business." They talked 
this way until one night Fanny Alice was at last persuaded to dye it 
agaim She did it at night, from necessity, by the flickering gas 
light in the dingy little kitchen. It was while they were at supper 
that night and the discussion as to colors was in full swing that 
another mysterious package arrived. 

"Dye!" cried Fanny Alice, ripping off the paper. "Let's see— 
lavendar dye!" The glorious hope now swelled high in her heart, 
for had not Mr. Fitzgerald expressed his fondness for lavendar ? He 
certainly had. Then surely it was he— dared she hope it ? If so, 
he must mean something by this mysterious procedure. She held it 
up in her hand and pouted her red mouth. Fanny Alice had a pretty 
mouth under the paint, with a wistful childish droop to one corner, 
and the thin lips of a dreamer. "Who sent it i" appealingly. She 
saw a blur of denying heads and they all looked black and shiny. 

But in spite of that, hope grew and grew. She blushed shyly as 
she came in to breakfast next morning, arrayed in her lavendar waist, 
a trifle streaked, perhaps a bit worn, but nevertheless, a lavendar 
silk waist. The approval of the table was not so general as before. 
Lavendar was not becoming to Fanny Alice and the table was not 
satisfied. They began at once to make suggestions for yet another 
color. But Fanny Alice was tired of lonesome hours spent in the 



The St. Marys Muse 21 



dingy kitchen and she put her foot down firmly on the idea. The 
boarders overruled her, however, and the Colonel gave a lengthy lec- 
ture on the virtues of making the final color a good, strong purple, 
Mr. Fitzgerald backing him up as a close second. Fanny Alice 
almost ran home from work that night. If there was a package of 
dye waiting for her, there could be no doubt. 

There it was, resting calmly on the little hall table. She opened 
it and let it fall again, radiant, her heart beating joyfully. She 
slipped into the dining-room to tell the news. Supper was not ready 
and the boarders were crowded around the stove while black Sarah 
slammed the plates on the table. The Colonel raised his whiskers 
from the inevitable paper. 

"You look as bright as a May morning today." This duly said, 
he subsided and the rest began. Mrs. Gumniy's voice broke in and 
stilled the hum of conversation. 

"Ye be a bit early t'night, Fanny Alice. I wisht ye'd run up and 
take two buckets of water to Col. Lawder's room. He said as how 
he'd need more'n his two pitchers t'night." Mrs. Gummy believed 
in putting every minute to use. 

Fanny Alice scooted to the kitchen on joyous feet. She was gone 
about ten minutes and when she came downstairs she stopped in the 
chilly hall to snatch up the little package of dye from the table. 
A stream of fine purple powder ran out. Evidently somebody had 
opened the package and helped himself to a bit! Now just what 
coidd that mean \ It didn't take Fanny Alice's brain long to solve 
the mystery. She had it — it was like this (and it was very sweet !). 
She dyed her waist with dye that he bought and sent her, and then he 
took some of the same dye to color a tie or something of his. This 
signified that he wished to marry her and to dye with the same dye 
until either he or she should die ! Oh, what a dear, quaint way of 
putting it. 

She took extra pains with the time-worn process that night, but in 
spite of her, the product was rather streaked. 

She could not sleep that night for thinking of the morning and 
whether his tie or socks or something would be purple. At last dawn 
broke over the row of dull tenements and Fanny Alice rose and 



22 The St. Maky's Muse 



arrayed herself in royal robes of purple. She lingered a minute in 
the outer hall before she could get up nerve to enter the dining- 
room. A bright green tie first smote her eyes, but under it she saw 
unmistakable signs of a lavendar shirt. Hope was not vet dead. 
She had not seen his socks ! But that could easily be done. In the 
midst of breakfast, Fanny Alice, with careful carelessness, dropped 
her napkin on the floor and dived under the table to get it. To the 
right of her she saw, oh cruel fate, a pair of bright green socks peep- 
ing above pointed brown oxfords. But wait — across the way, above 
stubby, polished shoes rose two purple clad legs, a rather dampish 
purple, and unmistakably streaked. Fanny Alice prayed hard that 
the floor would fall through and take her with it. 

Her head came slowly up again and her eyes met the Colonel's, 
which twinkled and narrowed in a smile. 

It was not the scene of a tragedy, this smudgy kitchen, redolent of 
bacon and eggs and dye-soap. Yet Fanny Alice crouched there in 
a bottomless old kitchen chair and pressed to her wet face a crushed 
little purple ball — the fateful waist ! 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Two Dollars 
Subscription Price - - '/.-.. Twenty-five Cents. 
Single Copies ^ 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary s 
Sctoot, Raleigh N. C., in the interest of the students and Alumna, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1919-20 
Mary T. Yellott, '20, Editor-in-Chief 
Catherine Miller, '20 Catharine Boyd, '20 

Crichton Thorne, '23 Mabel Norfleet, '23 

Frances Venable, '22 Louise Powell, '22 

Jane Ruffin, '20, Business Manager 
Ernest Cruikshank, Faculty Director 



EDITORIAL 

Exams are over ! Some of us look back on them with a feeling of 
triumph, and with no regret for the hours we spent in "cramming " 
Some of us prefer not to look back at all. In any case, now is the 
time to wipe the slate clean and start over. Exams are inevitable, but 
after they are over, whv not let the dead past bury its dead and— 
be-in thinking of the next set! A certain amount of "cramming 
at the end is necessary and desirable, but much of the frantic, last- 
minute agony may be avoided by sensible, systematic studying from 
day to day. We are not here only to pass examinations, but to learn 
things that will be of use to us later and to train our minds so that 
they may serve us better when we leave school and have no one to 
direct them for us. Cramming, taking it in the ordinary under- 
standing of the word, while it may enable a skillful student to pass 
an exam very creditably, does not serve this primary end of educa- 
tion, for it is impossible that a miscellaneous collection of facts tern- 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 



poranly absorbed will be long remembered. Moreover, it is much 
easier to "cram" at the end and hit the high spots if, as something to 
go on, there is a solid foundation of fact; built up from day to day. 

Moral: Let's get to work and make this second half year a success- 
ful one from every point of view. 



Did you ever stop to think that it may be just as much a duty to 
be cheerful as to be good? There is, indeed, no greater bore than 
a person who is good without being cheerful. At the other extreme 
there is the person who is too cheerful, always cheerful, cheerful even 
to the extent of being boring. But this at least is erring in a good 
cause. No one in this world lives altogether to himself— there is 
always association in one form or another with other people How 
much more true is this in a place like St. Mary's, necessarily some- 
what cut off from the outside, where one sees the same people and 
does more or less the same things every day. Since every one of us 
is bound to influence the rest in one way or another, why not let your 
influence be the very best possible ? It's just as easy to smile as to 
frown, once you get the habit, and it's very much more pleasant for 
the girls you pass in the halls or in the Grove to catch a glimpse of 
a mouth turning up at the corners than of one with a perpetual droop. 
bo let s be cheerful-think cheer, talk cheer, and act cheer, no matter 
if it is a horrid day and you've an hour's exercise to make up for 
yesterday. Remember when you're tempted to grumble and frown 



"A laugh is just like sunshine, 

It freshens all the day, 
It tips the peak of life with light 

And drives the clouds away. 
The soul grows glad that hears it 

And feels its courage strong — 
A laugh is just like sunshine 

For cheering folks along." 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 

SCHOOL NEWS 



December 13— Tbe ChristrQas Expression Recital 

On the last Saturday evening before the holidays, Miss Davis' 
Expression pupils entertained the School with a varied program of 
readings and one of her always successful little "one-act plays." 
Music before, between, and after, provided by the usual "Orchestra," 
added much to the enjoyment of a thoroughly enjoyable evening. 

The five recitations which preceded the little play were all cred- 
itably presented, the laurels going to Catharine Miller, who handled 
Henry Van Dyke's "The Lost Word" in a peculiarly appealing way. 
The other numbers on the program were : 

"The Story of the Fir Tree" Editn Miller 

"When Love and Duty Meet" Fielding Douthat 

"The Ballad of Sweet P" Rebecca Cole 

"The Gift of the Magi" Millicent Blanton 

After a brief interval, the curtain rose on a well-stocked hat shop 
and whispers could be heard all over the building, "There's So- 
and-so's hat !" From the moment Lorraine Smythe, as Gertie Gay, 
opened her mouth to emit a yawn and announce in her own inimi- 
tably funny way, "Lawsee, but I'm sleepy this morning !" the audi- 
ence was in hysterics. "Gertie" was far and away the "shero" of 
the playlet, though the other parts were played unusually well. 
Following was the cast: 



Gertie Gay Lorraine Smythe 

sephine Dixon 
Frances Miller 



Mary Mocker Josephine Dixon 



Miss Ann Thrope 

Miss Waver Lucile Hardy 

Miss Aider Betsy Ballou 

Mrs. Eminence Blount Eleanor Sublett 

Francesca Blount phoebe Palmer 

Miss Optimist Jean Gales 

Mrs. Daniel Cheery Annie Lee Edwards 



%6 The St. Mary's Muse 



December 15 — Second and fourth Teams Doubleheader 

Two of the most exciting games of the Basket Ball season were 
pulled off in the Gym on Monday, December 15th. Mus and Sigmas 
alike were full of pep and their enthusiastic cheers added zest to the 
game. 

The Second Teams were the first to take the field. They were 
well matched and the game was very close until the end, the final 
whistle bringing it to a finish while the score stood 18 to 16 in the 
Sigma's favor. The line-up was as follows: 

Sigma Mu 

E - C ° llier 1 Centers / E - Glass 

Everett j I Ashworth 

BlakeIy I Forwards i Venable 

Thompson S } Edmundson 

Baum I Guards J Wimberly 

Smythe ) t Scott 

Although not so well matched, the Fourth Teams played an un- 
usually exciting game. Bessie Brown, one of the new forwards, 
played up beyond the wildest dreams of the Mus, and was easily the 
star of the game, throwing goals with dizzying accuracy. Against her 
the Sigmas from the beginning stood no chance of winning, and the 
final score was a complete wipe-up, 46 to 14. Following is the line-up 
for the game : 

Sigma Mu 

^ all 1 0U [ Centers J Johnson 

Taylor ' i Sabiston 

Turner ) „ t i av 

,. ,,. } Forwards 3 ^ ay 

M. Nixon I ] Brown 

Yarborougb » Guards i Lenoir 

Battle-Pegues \ ' ' ' ' j j or( j an 

C. B. 

Decerober 17 — The Seniors' Christmas Surprise 

All the girls were in a grand good humor as they flocked into the 
Auditorium Wednesday night, December 17th. And indeed there 
was cause for good spirits, for the long-looked-forward-to Christmas 



The St. Mary's Muse ^_ 

Tree was at hand, the Christmas vacation began next day and all had 
been invited to a very mysterious surprise "something" given by the 
Seniors No wonder the audience joined in heartily and sang as the 
orchestra, composed of Elizabeth Tucker, Edith Miller and Margaret 
Elliott, played some favorite pieces. Then the programs were given 
out by the marshals, Mary Moffitt, Annie Higgs and Jane Buflm, and 
the nature of the Seniors' "mysterious something" was disclosed. It 
was a presentation of the ever-popular "Birds' Christmas Carol" by 
Kate Douglas Wiggin! Cheers for the Seniors and for Miss Davis, 
their Director, were given with great enthusiasm, and loud applause 
followed the raising of the curtain. 

Very good judgment had been shown in assigning the characters, 
for each actor carried out her particular part extremely well. Cath- 
erine Miller displayed her talent in the role of Carol Bird, and 
Millicent Blanton was at her best as Mrs. Buggies. Of the "seven 
little Kuggleses," perhaps Katherine Batts as Peoria got into her 
character most perfectly, though Margaret Kawlings as Sarah Maude 
and Patty Sherrod as Larry were both so good that it is impossible to 
say which of Mrs. Buggies' seven young'uns was best. 
The cast was as follows : 

Characters 

Carol Bird, a brave and generous little lame girl Catherine Miller 

Mr Bird, a wealthy hanker, Carol's father Mary Yellott 

Mrs. Bird, Carol's mother Na^cy Jf* 

, _ ., . Jane Toy 

Jack Bird, Carol's uncle 

Elfrida Clifford, Carol's nurse '''.''■ t*!, w™ 

Mrs Ruggles, a voluble and good-hearted mother of seven. .Millicent Blanton 
Sarah Maude, the oldest of the brood, aged fourteen. .. .Margaret Rawlmgs 

Peter, a lank youth of thirteen • ■ • f na Co °P 81 

, , ... Katherine Batts 

Peoria, aged eleven a , lWoH 

Kitty aged ten, considered the family beauty Eleanor bubiett 

Clement, mischievous and quick, aged nine Lucy London Anderson 

Cornelius, who smiles much but says little, aged eight ^"^f^ 

Larry, the youngest, aged six '.Rain'sford Glass 

The Butler 

Act I. The Birds' nest. 

Act II. Some other birds are taught to fly. 

Act III. Same as Act I. 



28 



The St. Mary's Muse 



In Act III curtain falls for a minute's intermission, which represents a 
half hour. 

Stage Directors 
Annie Duncan Sarah Davis 

Alice Cheek Ruth Womble 

Adelaide Smith Eugenia Thomas 

Pauline Miller 

After the final curtain, the light-hearted throng filed out of the 
Auditorium, everyone showering praises upon the Senior Class. 
Then one girl voiced the thought of all : 

"It was just purely excellent!" j 1 p y 



December 17— The ChristrQas Tree Entertainment 

At St. Mary's no occasion is looked forward to with more general 
pleasure than is the Christmas Tree. After the usual "Surprise 
Supper," served in a Dining Eoom transfigured by the Christmas 
decorations so ingeniously arranged by Mrs. Marriott and Miss Tal- 
bot, everyone hurried eagerly from the Auditorium to the Gym, and 
there impatiently awaited the opening of the doors. Lighted by 
candles and decorated with the cedar rope and wreaths upon which 
so many hours of song and laughter had been spent, the Gym was 
hardly to be recognized as the scene of our Physical Training classes, 
basket ball practices and games, the Hallowe'en Ball or the Circus! 
In the center of the room stood the Christmas Tree itself, adorned 
with all the glory of shining ornaments, tinsel, candles, and 'innumer- 
able red streamers from the tip of the tree to the cedar rope. What 
long-drawn Oh's and Ah's greeted it ! 

After the first burst of admiration there was a hush, and from a 
distance came the sound of carols. The door at the side opened and 
a long line of girls, dressed in white and carrying candles, entered 
and, singing as they came, formed a semi-circle about the tree. The 
spirit of Christmas, unconsciously, perhaps, at first, came upon us 
as we listened to the carols we loved best. The beauty of it all filled 
our hearts with peace and love. 



The St. Maky's Muse 



29 



Then Santa Glaus peered over the top of his chimney and the 
familiar voice of Millicent Blanton, a trifle muffled, 'tis true, by her 
huge Santa Claus head, welcomed the laughing crowd. He first in- 
troduced Miss Evelyn Way, who, dressed as a little French maiden, 
read a French Christmas poem, "L' Alsace et La Lorraine." After 
this he read and presented the "general knocks," always a character- 
istic feature of the Christmas entertainment at St. Mary's. Some of 
these were highly appropriate and caused a great deal of amusement. 
The Juniors then distributed the individual knocks and bags of 
candy. This year marked the return to the old befo' de War custom 
of having ten-cent presents to represent the knocks, and every one 
found her efforts to find something "knockable" in her friends very 

amusing. 

The entertainment was one of the most thoroughly enjoyable 
events of the vear, and the thoughts of the morrow brought a smile 
to every f ace," even the Seniors, though deep down in their hearts 
perhaps there lurked a secret regret that they had seen their last 

Christmas Tree at St. Mary's. 

C. M. M. 



" Ho roe ward Bound" 

At six o'clock on the morning of December 18, 1919, we were 
awakened by the voices of the Seniors, singing Christmas carols in 
the shivering cold of a dark, real-winter morning. Awakened to the 
fact that the most glorious day in the history of man had dawned— 
or was about to dawn— at last. For today we were going home ! Ah, 
that magic word, "Home!" Why, joy fairly radiates from it. Work 
was over. For nearly three weeks we would not see a text book, nor 
be roused from our peaceful slumbers by the nerve wracking clamor 
of "that rising bell." 

Will we ever forget the thrills that tingled through us as we 
stepped aboard the street car that was to start us on our happy jour- 
ney? And O, at the station— why, every face "shone as the sun," 
despite the skilfully applied powder of a thousand varieties. The 



30 The St. Mart's Muse 



odor of train smoke — was ever a p. -of ume more delightful ? For. of 
course, smoke meant a train and a train meant home ! 

"Fifteen minutes to wa^'fc!" Eternity of agony! "There, I knew 
Fd forget something ! I left my Carolina pillow right on the window 
seat, and I just know it'll be gone when I get back. Do you reckon 
if I dropped Mr. Cruik a card he'd mind putting it away for me ? 
He's always so nice about things like that. The time I left my 
pocketbook with every cent I possessed in the world in it in my top 
bureau drawer, I just wrote to him about it and he kept it for me. I 
think I'll do that now while I'm waiting. Where on earth's my foun- 
tain pen ? I know I put it in my pocket — no, I remember, I left that 
in my French book. Well, I'll just ask him to put that away too. It 
won't be any more trouble. Lend me yours, will you ? Oh-h ! Is 
that our train ? Well, I can write when I get home. Let's hurry so 
we can get a seat. Did you ever see so many people all trying to get 
on the same train at once ? This is pandemonium for sure, isn't it ? 
But do you know, I'll be Home in exactly four hours ? Let's run!" 

And so there is a mad, mad rush, and at last, with much waving 
of hands and shouting of good-byes to those left behind, St. Mary's 
is homeward bound. M. ~N. 



" Back Again " 

"We'll be in Raleigh in fifteen minutes !" 

The conductor thought he was being kind, but it was his mistake. 
Fifteen more minutes ! And each minute our sinking spirits were 
weighed down more heavily. Why must the train rush on so fast? 
Each chug of the heartless engine was bearing us farther away from 
Mother, from home, from cozy firesides, from days that began at 
eleven and ended at two, when we fell asleep, exhausted by that 
"marvelous heavenly dance." Each chug was also bringing us nearer 
to cold, unyielding discipline. 

The well-meaning porter collected our suitcases. A scramble for 
hats followed, but it was a mild scramble. We didn't specially care 
whether we had any hats. What difference did it make ? We were 
nearly there, nearly back to St. Mary's, to books, to painful classes, 
to rules and to bells, bells, bells ! 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



CM The train was slowing down. Slower, slower, stopped! Of 
course we got off; that was inevitable. And there was Mr. Stone 
waiting for us and our baggage checks, and cheerful as of old. We 
greeted him with smiles a trifle forced. 

" We pulled ourselves aboard the street car, and began chatting 
half-heartedly with our next door neighbors— "Did you have a won- 
derful time? 0, did you see Charlie? You did? O, my dear! You 
know you didn't ! Yes, I went to that dance. Met the cutest boy— 
you know him? Isn't he simply killing ? I 'clare I don't see how 
I'm ever going to get back to studying and going to bed at ten o'clock. 
I haven't hit the hay before one or two since I left here. Danced all 
night and most all day. Oh, dear, are we here ?" 

No, just a change of cars. The Capitol, Hillsboro Street, St. 
Mary's! And here we were. Excitement reigned supreme as friends 
parted for three long, short weeks met again, as crushes peeked out 
of front windows to see if "She" had come or, more bold, rushed out 
to greet her in the Grove. Glances of curiosity were thrown in the 
direction of the New Girls, and tongues wagged unceasingly. Where 
were the tears we had expected to shed on this doleful occasion 
Forgotten in the general excitement of seeing everybody again— and 
if a%ote had been taken on the spot, I think the majority would 
have decided that being "back" was not really so bad after all. 

_Lj. X . 



January 10— "Uncle Rerrjus" 

On Saturday evening, January 10th, the St. Mary's girls gathered 
in the parlor to hear Dr. Eichard Lewis, a prominent member of the 
Board of Trustees, give his long looked forward to "Readings from 
Uncle Remus." Dr. Lewis read several stories, including the ever 
popular "Tar Baby," a poem, "When Melindy Sings," and told two 
or three jokes "just like a North Carolina nigger." We all owe 
"Uncle Dick" a vote of thanks for making us laugh away the natural 
blues which came on our first Saturday night back at St. Mary's 

after the Christmas holidays. 

M. N. 



32 The St. Mary^s Muse 



January 21— A Wedding in the Chapel 

Excitement reigned supreme throughout St. Mary's on Wednesday 
afternoon, January 21st. Our own little Chapel was to be the scene 
of a wedding! We had wondered all day how Mr. Stone could possibly 
sit there and conduct his classes, knowing that his daughter, Florence, 
was to be married that very afternoon, and there had been much 
speculation as to whether or not he would meet his C History at 
quarter of three. (He didn't.) The wedding was to take place at 
five o'clock, but all day there was much scurrying about in the Chapel, 
preparing everything for the great event. The keynote was sim- 
plicity, and the Chapel was beautiful with its decorations of green, 
and tall white cathedral candles, shedding their soft glow on the 
impressive scene. 

The guests began arriving ahead of time, and were ushered to their 
places by Mr. George Howard, Jr., of Tarboro, and Mr. Oliver Smith, 
of Ealeigh. The little Chapel was soon well filled, and on the stroke 
of five, as the strains of Lohengrin's Wedding March pealed forth, 
played by Mr. Jones, the wedding party entered. The bridesmaids 
in their rainbow evening gowns were a lovely sight, but the center of 
attraction was the little bride, who entered on the arm of her father, 
wearing an exquisite gown of ivory satin draped in iridescents and 
pearl passementerie and carrying a shower of pink bride's roses. In 
her coronet veil was combined some of her grandmother's wedding 
lace. At the foot of the chancel steps they were met by the groom, 
Ernest P. Hough, of Indianola, Miss. 

The ceremony was performed by Mr. Way, after which Mendels- 
sohn's Wedding March was played as a recessional while the wedding 
party withdrew; Mr. and Mrs. Hough leading, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Stone bringing up the rear. Immediately after the ceremony the 
bridal party and a few of the bride's friends and relatives were given 
an informal reception at the home of her parents on Boylan Avenue. 
The bride and groom left on a night train for New Orleans, and after 
their honeymoon they will be at home in Indianola, where Mr. Houffh 
having recently received his discharge from the Navy, where he held 
the rank of Ensign, is at present in the wholesale drug business with 
his father. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Tpoii our return after the holidays, we were surprised to discover 
the lights as of an ^habited building twinkling merrily away out 
behind the Auditorium. It was almost impossible to believe the 
Ibvious fact— after weary months of waiting, the Cruikshanks were 
at last established in the little cottage familiarly and affectionately 
referred to among us as "The Cruikshank Mansion." 

Instead of the usual Chapter meetings, on Sunday evening, Jan- 
uary 11th, an Inter-Chapter meeting was held in the Parlor, the 
subject of the meeting being Foreign Missions. Interesting papers 
were read on Africa, China, Japan and Latin America. 

An informal concert in the Parlor, Sunday, January 18th, was the 
occasion for the unusually large assembly in that room about eight- 
thirty. Miss Morehardt was the star performer, and her lovely 
voice completely charmed her aundience. Miss St. John was enthusi- 
astically encored at the piano. The other performers, Estelle Ayent, 
Edith Miller and Margaret Elliott contributed much to an evening's 
enjoyment, and were rewarded with appreciative applause. 

In celebration of the birthdays of Kobert E. Lee and Stonewall 
Jackson on January 19th and 21st respectively, the Sigma Lambda 
and E. A. P. Literary societies held a union meeting on Tuesday, 
January 20th. Jane Toy opened the meeting and, after "Dixie" 
had been sung with the usual pep, Catharine Miller read a sketch of 
the lives of these Southern heroes. Miss Katie then told us a little 
about the love of the South for Lee, and the meeting was closed by 
Lucy London Anderson after "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground" 
had been sung, with, perhaps, a shade less feeling than when it closed 
a similar meeting two years ago, during the War. 

Judging from appearances, the Duplex Envelope System is work- 
ing at St. Mary's even better than we had confidently expected. The 
envelopes on the first Sunday after its introduction overflowed the 
plates to such an extent that two additional Wardens had to be 
appointed to take up the collection in the transept. 



34; The St. Mary's Muse 



After a year and a half of glorious freedom from the tyranny of j 
an Exercise Chart, a new and very business-like one has been posted 
in the Schoolroom, and every girl is required not only to be out in 
the Grove an hour a day, but to state that she has done so. It is now 
a common sight, especially after breakfast and lunch, to see a strag- . 
gling procession of girls hurrying around the Grove, anxious to com- 
plete the required ten circuits and, with a sigh of relief at duty done, 
post her little W on the chart. 

The "Cruikshank Mansion" was the scene of a merry party on 
Saturday evening, January 24th, when Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank j 
gave the Seniors a candy-pull. Despite the fact that due to the 
extreme dampness of the weather the taffy refused to act as taffy 
should, the party was a great success, and even those Seniors most 
devoted to the pursuit of knowledge voted it a much more pleasant 
way of spending the last Saturday night before exams than the cus- 
tomary cramming. 

So far the lectures which we have attended this year have been of 
interest mainly from a geographical and historical point of view. 
On Thursday evening, January 15th, Miss Shearer and Miss Quack- 
enbos chaperoned the French pupils, of a standing sufficiently ad- 
vanced to appreciate the treat in store for them, to a French lecture 
over at Meredith. Monsieur Thomas lectured for an hour on "Maroc," 
in common everyday language known as Morocco, and his audience 
was evidently deeply impressed, if not highly edified, by his lecture. 
The following Thursday evening Mr. Edgar C. Eaine delivered in 
our own Auditorium an illustrated lecture on Alaska. Some of the 
views he showed were beautiful, and the stillness reigning through- 
out the darkened building testified to the interest of the audience. 

On Wednesday evening, January 21st, the School turned out 
almost in a body to attend the second of the series of concerts to be 
given during the winter in the City Auditorium. This time the at- 
traction was Galli-Curci, and on their return, St. Mary's was ready 
to add a word to the general praise of the famous singer. If the last 
two concerts measure up to the standard of those already given, we 
have certainly two pleasant evenings to look forward to. 



The St. Mary's Muse 35 



It was a great pleasure to the old girls and members of the faculty 
to welcome back Dr. Lay, when he paid us a flying visit. He 
preached the sermon at the morning service on January 25th, and as 
the familiar, earnest voice filled the Chapel many of us felt posi- 
tively homesick for "the good old days of the years gone by." 

On Thursday afternoon, January 29th, Mr. and Mrs. Way de- 
lightfully entertained the faculty with a reception in honor of Mrs. 
Lay. 

The Inter-Society Contest is progressing as the year rolls on. The 
Thanksgiving and Christmas numbers of the Muse were submitted to 
outside judges, who rendered their decision two to one in favor of the 
E. A. P.'s. This is their third victory in the contest, having been 
voted winners of the Contest Meetings held on Founders' Day and 
Armistice Day, and again of the Model Meetings held on the even- 
ings of December 10th and 11th. There remain two Muse contests, 
four "contest meetings," two "model meetings" and the Annual 
Debate. 



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and SODA FOUNTAIN 

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The Ghost of former days looked down 

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And noted everything he found 

As was his ghostly rule. 
First, "Why," he said, "those poor girls want 

To walk I can't surmise!" 
The answer is, a little jaunt — 

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Poor Ghost. He saw some puzzling things; 

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Girls rushing forth pell mell. 
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While voting it a bore. 
Ere long the Ghost perceived twas just 

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Advertisements 



THE FASHION 

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ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

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Hot Water Heating 



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Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

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Phone 529 



W. L. BROGDEN & GO. 

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Again our Ghost looked down and saw 

A truly sadd'ning scene — 
This sign: "You really can't come in 

For we're in Quarantine!" 
"Well, well," said he, "it's rude, but quite 

The only thing to do. 
This sign is a less sadd'ning sight 

Than 'We have got the FLU!' " 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 

Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

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Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

FINB CANDIES PURE ICE CREAM 
FRUIT 

We carry the most complete line of Fruit and 

Candies in town. 

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JOHNSON COAL & ICE CO. 



109 West Martin Street 



Phone 457 



H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

RALEIGH, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 

Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



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Caviness' Grocery 

Everything Good to Eat 

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Carlp Spring number 

Jfebtuat? 1920 



CONTENTS 



Literary Department: 

Spring Song 3 

Tommy's Uncle Dave Lenore Powell 4 

Traditions at St. Mary's Jane Toy 10 

The Average Girl Louise Egleston 13 

Sweet Sixteen Mabel Norfleet 14 

The Unpardonable Accusation Louise Egleston 20 

How We Do It Lenore Powell 26 

Old and New Dorothy Kirtland 27 

Editorial „„ 

School News 30 

Items of Interest 39 

Advertisements 42 



The St. M&ry's Muse 

EARLY SPRING NUMBER 



Vol. XXV February, 1920 gft 5 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by The Bpsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 

Editors 
Jane Toy Nancy Lay 

Eleanor Sublett 



Spriog Song 

O youth is the Spring o' the year, love, 

And love is the light o' the Spring! 
Then love me while we are young, love, 
For youth is a fleeting thing. 
And love may fly with our fleeting youth, 
Its fresh bloom faded too soon, in truth- 
Then love me while we are young, love, 
For youth is a fleeting thing! 

O love me not then for my eyes, love, 

For time may soon dim their dark blue. 
Then all that is lovely in them, love, 

Will be the reflection of you. 
Nor love me because I am fair, dear, 

For beauty lives scarce but a day 
And love that lives only on looks, dear, 

No longer than beauty will stay. 
Nor love me alone for my kisses — 

Too sweet they are likely to prove — 
O question not, dear, why you love me, 

Be satisfied only to love. 

For youth is the Spring o' the year, love, 

And love is the light of the Spring 
Then love me while we are young, love, 
For youth is a fleeting thing. 
But love may live through eternity, 
And mine is such deathless love for thee 
I'll love thee till Heaven is old, love, 
For youth is a fleeting thing! 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Tomnjy's Uijcle Dave 

Lenore Powell,, '23 

Titters floated over the room; mischievous heads ducked towards 
desks iu furtive glee ; one particularly bold little head tossed its black 
curls and laughed in open defiance. 

On the platform stood Elizabeth Bryan, young, indignantly 
flushed, black eyes flashing. 

"Will the class please come to order I" The voice, for all its firm, 
angry tones, sounded a bit helpless. "Mary Ellen Morris, what have 
you there ?" 

Sympathetic murmurs, intermingled with giggles of anticipatory 
delight, rose. Mary Ellen Morris, known most aptly to her friends 
as Tommy, lifted fearless gray eyes. 

"Nothing, Miss Betty. Nothing 'cep'in' a picture of that sissy 
Sam Willard. He's 'bout the sissiest boy I ever saw. Don't you 
think so, Miss Betty?" The eyes were frankly smiling now, look- 
ing positively roguish as Tommy put her question. 

"Certainly not, Mary Ellen. Bring the paper to the desk at 
once !" Betty remained heroically unmoved. 

Tommy, thus commanded, walked up the aisle, her little feet pick- 
ing their way as grandly as any duchess. She handed the offending 
slip to Miss Betty, who laid it decisively down, vaguely determined 
not to look at it. But somehow her glance did fall in that direction, 
and then, suddenly, Miss Betty was seen to bite her lips to keep an 
irrepressible smile from them. Eor there lay a remarkably clever 
caricature, most unflatteringly life-like, of Samuel Allen Willard, 
holding in his hand a baby doll and between his lips a rubber pacifier. 

"I want to see you — for a few minutes, after school, Tommy," and 
thus Betty ended a little episode, the like of which took place nearly 
every day. 

And then proceeded the usual, rather unexciting, order of lessons. 
Stumbling recitations were interspersed, not too often, with bril- 
liantly flowing speeches of star pupils. The hilarious few minutes 
of recess were spent by the boys and a certain black-haired little 



The St. Mart's Muse 



damsel in a boisterous game of ball, and by the more sober-minded 
little girls in playing jump-the-rope. 

When the last of these carefree ones had left the schoolhouse, 
abandoned and more brownly bare looking than ever, Betty con- 
fronted her small antagonist. 

It was a peculiarly lovable little face upturned to hers, honest and 
mischief -loving. The blue gingham dress which covered rather than 
adorned the slender figure, was scanty and in dire need of mending. 
The holes in the stockings displayed remnants of summer's tan on 
the wiry legs. 

"Yes 'm ?" Tommy opened the conversation with this meaningful 

query. 

"Tommy, why are you so naughty? I know you don't mean to 
make it hard for me, but— you really do, Honey. Can't you see 
when you continue to make the class so disorderly they will never 
learn anything?" 

"Uncle Dave told me as how it was all right for me to do every- 
thing I wanted to. Anyways, he said it didn't matter if you didn't 
learn nothin'. Uncle Dave's a powerful smart man, Miss Betty, I 
reckon he must be right." 

Betty was genuinely shocked. That any man should seemingly be 
so blind to the absolute necessity of education! With her mind 
literally brimming over with up-to-date college instilled ideals, Betty 
felt herself, in this her first year of "school-marmship," confronted 
by a disconcerting problem. So this accounted for Tommy's long- 
continued misbehavior ! There was but one course left that she could 
conscientiously pursue. 

Betty knew that Tommy's sole guardian was this "Uncle Dave," 
a surveyor well thought of by the people of Goshen, and a newcomer 
to the town. This was as far as her knowledge extended. Dutifully 
she told herself that she must interview "Uncle Dave." 

"Tommy, do you think if I walk home with you this afternoon 
that we will find your Uncle David there?" 

"Oh, will you come, Miss Betty ?" Tommy's response was eager. 
The prospect of having the adored-f rom-af ar teacher come home with 
her was evidently beyond her wildest expectations. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



"But — will your uncle be home. Tommy?" Miss Betty repeated 
her question. 

"Oh, yes'm. I'm sure he will. He's the plum busiest man I ever 
saw, but he's 'most always there when I come from school." 

"All right then. Hurry, Tommy, and get your coat." 

As they walked along the country road, the chill wind cutting their 
cheeks and blowing their hair into charming disarray, Betty only 
half-listened to Tommy's childish prattle. She was thinking of the 
most diplomatic way to approach an erring guardian, the most suc- 
cessful way to put her argument. The art of changing any man's 
views on a subject was new to her, and Betty felt her timidity increas- 
ing as they drew nearer the house. 

All too soon they came in view of Uncle David's domicile. Betty 
was surprised to see the bungalow so quaintly comfortable looking, 
set far back in a woodsy nook, the brown and green of its shingles 
blending gently into the foliage and trees of the background. 

Trembling fingers clasping tightly Tommy's slender hand, Betty 
ascended the incline that led to the house. They were up the rustic 
steps, across the porch and on the threshold of the door in what 
seemed to Betty less than a second. Here Tommy, with unnecessary 
boldness, flung wide open the door. 

It was not the friendly coziness of the room that first attracted 
Betty's attention, but the figure of a man bending over the fireplace, 
in the act of putting a log on the blazing hearth. His six feet of 
height fairly radiated strength, and his arms, bare to the elbows, 
were tanned and muscular. The black hair, with its suggestion of 
a wave very like Tommy's, proclaimed its owner to be young. Be- 
fore Betty could collect her scattered thoughts, Tommy's "Hey, Uncle 
Dave !" called the young man from his task. Quickly, with a "Hello, 
Sweetheart," on his lips, he turned, and then abruptly stopped, 
mouth open in wonder at the radiant vision he saw there. 

For it was indeed a wind-tossed, flushed and angry Betty he saw. 
The brown eyes sparkled with hostility, the little jaws were set firmly 
together, and there was the least suggestion of lady-like scorn in the 



The St. Mart's Muse 



tilted nose. In that minute of discovery that "Uncle Dave" was by 
no means a person superior in years, all trace of fear left her and the 
old fury returned. 

"This is Uncle Da— I mean, Mr. Morris, isn't it ?" Betty recovered 
her dignity and finished with a touch of defiance. 

"Why, yes. Yes, indeed." The voice was boyishly courteous, but 
it was easily to be seen that the young man was flabbergasted. Grin- 
ning, he displayed a row of even white teeth. Betty steeled herself 
against the admission that he had a rather engaging smile. 

"Why, Tommy ! Where are your manners ? Introduce me to the 

pretty lady." 

Now Betty was furious. To her this seemed the last straw. But 
Tommy, all unmindful of this and feeling that she had at last been 
given her rightful prominence in the conversation, thought to make 
the best of her opportunity. In her most finished manner she said, 
"Uncle Dave, this here's Miss Betty. Miss Betty, I am pleased to 
in'erdooce Uncle Dave." 

Formalities being thus disposed of, Betty knew it was up to her. 

"I came to speak to you, Mr. Morris, about Tommy. Perhaps, if 
it's convenient, Tommy might — " 

With an instinct rather uncommon to his sex, Betty thought, he 
instantly divined her meaning and with a "Run upstairs, Tommy, 
and get ready for supper," he dismissed the little girl. 

"All right!" Uncle Dave, beginning to feel somewhat natural 
once more, gave himself up to the pleasure of the moment. "Now, 
Miss — Miss Bryan, is it not ? What was it you were saying about 
my wild little niece? But first, let me ask you if you won't be so 
kind as to stay with us to supper. It's getting rather—" 

"Oh, no. No, indeed. I couldn't possibly. Thank you so much, 
just the same." Betty realized that she was chattering as foolishly 
as a school girl, and attempting to redeem herself, she continued. 

"You see, I merely came to see about Tommy. She really is so 
sweet. But I had no idea it was so late, of course — " 

"But, Miss Bryan, surely you didn't come to tell me that Tommy 
is a sweet child. She is sweet, though, isn't she?" 
The man was actually playing with her ! 



The St. Maky's Muse 



"I wanted to say— that is— I came to tell you— Oh, Mr. Morris, 
I think you are horrid ! So thoughtless not to pay any more attention 
to your ch — I mean, your niece's education than you do ! She would 
be well-behaved, I'm sure, and certainly she would care more for her 
studies, if only you would encourage it. Actually she says that you 
think it unnecessary to learn anything!" 

Betty grew hotter and hotter. She stopped at last, from sheer lack 
of breath. 

During this attack Uncle David sat wondering, rather surprised 
at the suddenness of it all, an unmistakable look of admiration on 
his face. 

"Bravo, Miss Bryan ! I can truthfully say that's the best lecture 
I've ever received. And now, will you believe me when I say I had 
no idea — not the slightest — of wrecking Tommy's future by — well, 
let us say by the instilling of wrong ideals ? You see, Fm rather 
new at this game of guardianship, and all I need is a little coaching. 
It didn't take me long to find that the best way to manage Tommy 
was to let her manage me. And so I did !" He smiled disarmingly. 
"You know, Miss Bryan, she really is a sweet child, though !" 

At this point Tommy presented herself, hair combed back with 
painful care, face gleaming unnaturally from the too violent use 
of soap. 

"Oh, Miss Betty ! Gee, but you look mad !" was Tommy's tactless 
remark. 

"My, Sweetheart, but you look clean," Uncle Dave came to the 
rescue. "Now, talk to Miss Betty while I get the buggy to carry 
her home. She won't be able to stay with us to supper. We're sorry, 
aren't we ?" and in two or three long strides he was out of the room. 
Betty felt grateful and confused. 

The ride back to Goshen, through the fast-falling dusk, bade fair 
to be strained, Betty sitting with hands primly folded in her lap, 
David looking straight forward, with forced intentness, on the 
shadowy road. Betty drew the furs closer about her neck, a little 
ashamed of her fear of the night, but feeling a strange comfort in 
the presence of the man beside her. Eepenting her outburst and 
thinking that perhaps, after all, "Uncle Dave" wasn't such a bad 



The St. Maky's Muse 



sort, she began, "I love this cold, dark, mysterious sort of night, 
especially when— when there isn't any cause to be afraid, don't you ?" 
"Oh— oh, by George, I certainly do! Never thought about it 
before. I like riding along, this way, too." 

"Do you ? I'm having an awfully good time. Only I feel that 
this isn't exactly where I ought to be. A school teacher, you know—" 
"Oh, say ! I've been wanting to ask you a question. How do you 
come to be teaching anyway ? It doesn't seem right, exactly, to me." 
They were rapidly growing acquainted ; David, with the "peppiest, 
best-looking little girl he ever saw"; Betty, with an "unusual man, 
so strong, and funny — and dependable, you know." 

This was only a beginning. Many were the rides that the "best- 
looking girl" and the "unusual man" took together. The brownly 
bare little schoolhouse witnessed some interesting things as it looked 
innocently on. One St. Valentine's Day, when the brownness of it 
was hidden by a great mantle of snow, and the bare limbs of the 
trees were cheerfully glowing in their white coverings, the same 
"unusual man" drove up in a jingling sleigh, and wanted to see the 
same "best-looking girl." 

When Betty came out with the mischief-making Tommy at her 
side, her cheeks had that same glow that they had had when she first 
encountered "Uncle Dave," but a soft, almost bashful light took the 
place of the angry flash in the brown eyes. 

"Why, David ! Tommy and I have been waiting fully five min- 
utes, I know," she said, as she held out a small gloved hand. 

Had a stranger, all unknowing, viewed the scene, he would per- 
haps have marveled that the girlish figure was the awe-inspiring 
schoolmarm of Goshen, and the man the staid uncle of the black- 
haired little girl. 

Tommy, as from long practice, climbed in the back of the sleigh, 
while the two took their places. Gliding smoothly over the sparkling 
snow, Tommy forgot her companions as she became engrossed in what 
she held in her hand. Perhaps it was just as well, for indeed, the 
others were engrossed in each other. In Tommy's hand was a valen- 
tine, most beautiful with flowers, cupids, and lacy frills, upon the 



10 The St. Mary's Muse 



back of which was written, "Will Miss Betty be our Valentine? 
Tommy and David." Tommy had failed to deliver it! But, did it 

matter ? 



Traditions at St. Mary's 
Jane Toy, '20 

Life at St. Mary's, in all its many different aspects, is rich in tra- 
ditions, small in themselves, but each contributing to give St. Mary's 
an atmosphere all her own. They range from ridiculous to solemn, 
from the Tacky Party of the Preps to the last serenade of the Seniors, 
and altogether they make up a part of the life of St. Mary's that is 
by no means a small one. 

Perhaps the traditions most often called to mind are those that 
cling to the different parts of the buildings and grounds ; the Parlor, 
where year by year the old portraits look down upon the ever-chang- 
ing pictures of the girls who dance ; the Chapel, filled with solemn 
memories, not only of the daily services, but also of those which stand 
out in each year, traditions in themselves — the Easter service, with 
the long line of white-clad girls filing into the Chapel in the gray- 
green light of the spring dawn, and, again in white, the last Chapel 
line as it passes down the aisle to the triumphant notes of "Jerusalem, 
High Tower." The Grove, too, with its familiar paths and benches, 
what memories it holds of walks with arms entwined and heads to- 
gether ! Traditions these, nor is there any danger that they will be 
forgotten ! More hidden, but still sweeter, is the woodsy spot behind 
the Auditorium where eager groups of girls flock each year in violet 
time. No one announces that the prettiest violets grow here — there 
is no need of it, for from year to year the tradition is handed down, 
and each spring adds to the number of girls who know the thrill of 
finding the first violets behind the Auditorium. 

But there are traditions other than those that cling to these mem- 
ory-laden spots, and chief among these are the traditional entertain- 
ments which are given each year. The Old Girls' Party to the New, 
in itself a tradition, typifies the spirit of consideration and kindness 
to the new girls which is a part of the St. Mary's code. The Class 



The St. Mart's Muse U 



Parties, when the Seniors and Juniors entertain their sister classes 
carry on this spirit, and later in the year when the Freshmen and 
Sophomores return their hospitality, again the bond is strengthened. 
The Hallowe'en Ball stands out as one of the events of the year, and 
it, too, has traditions all its own. Miss Sutton, at the piano, plays 
for the grand march as only Miss Sutton can play, and later the 
Seniors, entering the circle of gayly costumed and masked figures 
give their "stunt." Next in the year comes the Christmas celebra- 
tion, and this, too, is enriched by customs handed down from year to 
year. For days before the momentous occasion, happy fingers are 
busy with the fragrant cedar rope, happy voices are humming carols, 
and the air is full of excitement, suppressed and otherwise, which 
culminates on the night before leaving day. A substantial tradition 
indeed are the fried oysters and ice cream which greet us at the 
dinner table, but after dinner comes the climax— the Seniors' enter- 
tainment to the School (sh-h-h, this is a secret!) and the Christmas 
Tree in the Gym, with the cedar rope proudly displayed, the piles 
of mysterious "knocks," the white-clad choir with candles, singing 
carols, and the crowning touch of all, a "really truly" Santa Claus 
rising out of the chimney in the corner. The Seniors' carols at crack 
o' day next morning and the final recessional in the Chapel, "On Our 
Way Eejoicing," ends the traditional Christmas celebration, an event 
not soon to be forgotten. 

The Colonial Ball, next, just before the long Lenten season, when 
there is no dancing in the Parlor and the Chapters are busily engaged 
on Friday evenings in special Lenten work. Then Easter, with the 
egg hunt, and finally the School Party and Commencement. The 
School Party especially is a tradition individual to St. Mary's, and 
one filled with particular interest. The classes, wearing their colors 
and singing their songs, appear then as units, from "the little Prep- 
lets, a-sitting over here," to the Seniors, in caps and gowns, who 
drink toasts in ginger ale and sing the traditional School Party songs, 
ending with "Good-bye, School, we're through." Following close 
upon the School Party comes Commencement, in many ways like the 
Commencement exercises of countless other schools, but different, 
too, because of its individual traditions. The Seniors, bearing the 



12 The St. Maey's Muse 



precious daisy chain, pass on Class Day under the flowery arch which 
stands in front of Smedes Hall, and on Commencement Day the 
Chief Marshal there ends the ceremonies, as well as the school year, 
with the traditional "School is dismissed I" 

Traditions at St. Mary's are not confined to red-letter days, how- 
ever. Every day, consciously or unconsciously, they form a part of 
the life here, in the shape of customs and expressions which are 
handed down from one set of St. Mary's girls to the next. Where 
but at St. Mary's do they "shake" for the extra dessert, or make 
wishes on joined rolls at the dinner table ? The hurried good-night 
calls of the Seniors, too, are traditions, and there are a host of others, 
so familiar that we take them for granted. But small though they 
seem, they are one of the pleasantest parts of the life here, and it is 
they that make St. Mary's different from any other place in the 
world. 



The St. Mary's Muse I 3 



Trje Average Girl 

Louise Egleston, '23 

The average girl she's got a beau, 
Most likely he's named Bill or Joe 

Or Tom or Fred or Dick or Sam, 
And 'cording to her he's the "Sam what am! 
But since I've got nobody much 
I reckon I'm not listed such 
as 
"THE AVERAGE". 

The average girl on Friday nights 
Is 'scorted out to see the sights, 

To see the movies or the town 
And watch Joe sling his quarters round. 

Ah woe is me — I have no beau, 

I must be very much below 

"THE AVERAGE". 

The average girl can dance and play, 
She isn't shocked at cabaret. 

She smokes good cigarettes and blows 
The pretty smoke right through her nose. 
But Ma'd die if I smoked, you see, 
And so I think I'll never be 
'mong 
"THE AVERAGE". 

But some day I am going to see 
A boy that likes a girl like me. 

Of course, his name's a special kind 
But if he's nice, I'll change my mind. 

Then when he comes and falls in love 

I'll be so very much above 

"THE AVERAGE". 



14 The St. Maey's Muse 



Sweet Sixteeo 

Mabel Norfleet, '23 

At exactly 7 :05 A.M. on Friday, February the Thirteenth, Jacque- 
line Pennington awoke to the realization of the fact that she was six- 
teen. She was thrilled, yes, that is the word, thrilled! She had 
always, from her very childhood, thought of sixteen as the age; in 
fact, when one was sixteen one must be quite a young lady, well 
versed in the ways of the world. "Sweet sixteen, and never been 
kissed," she repeated to herself, as she lay warmly in bed. True to 
life. She knew nothing of the world, of men, etc. She would know, 
she would begin that very day ! 

"My goodness, I have been a kid — I don't believe there is another 
girl my age who has such childish ways. I'll change them though, 
sure as I was a tomboy and a good little sport, like Jim says, yester- 
day ! Why, I even wear my hair down my back. Guess I'd better 
get up and begin my transformation. It will take some time to get 
my hair up on my head." 

So, suiting the action to her words, she jumped out of bed and 
began her first "sweet sixteen" toilette. 

When she walked into the dining-room, hoping she looked her age, 
she was greeted by, "Many happy returns of the day, Jacqueline," 
from her father and mother, and from her complimentary twelve- 
year-old brother, "Happy birthday, Jack. Gosh, but you've got your 
hair up! You look a hundred!" 

"Yes, Jack, you really have grown up over night; you look quite 
twenty with your hair up. But I hope you don't mean to put it up 
every day. Of course you may today," came from her gentle mother. 

"Quite right, Euth," said Jack's doting father. "I can't believe 
my little daughter is even sixteen yet. It seems only yesterday that 
we were married." 

"That's just it, father. Everybody regards me as a perfect baby. 
I think I'm old enough now to show them differently, and I will, 
too !" 



The St. Maby's Muse 15 



"Aw, shut up, Jack. Anybody might suppose you were as old as 
mother. You're beginning to act silly just like all the other girls. 
Next thing you'll be spooning around with beaux. Gosh! Girls 
make me sick !" This, of course, from her brother Bob. 

Jack merely turned up her nose, coldly ignoring him as she took 
her place at the table. To tell the truth, she was rather disappointed 
at not having received any birthday presents. Usually they were 
handed out to her as she entered the dining-room. She seized her 
napkin and jerkily unfolded it, and as she did so a bright five-dollar 
gold piece, a pretty pearl pin, and a silver thimble flew from its 
folds to the floor. Jack's face brightened, though she was disap- 
pointed that she hadn't received something suitable for a young lady 
of sixteen. Baby's presents, those ! However, she managed to thank 
her family with fairly good grace. 

"Say, Jack, what d'ye expect to do with that five dollars Dad gave 
you ? Bet you buy powder and p'f ume and all sorts of silly girl 
fixings. I don't believe you like that thimble I gave you, or the pin 
mamma gave you, either. Think you ought to have something more 
grown up when you're swe-e-e-et sixteen, don't you, huh ?" 

"Mother, will you make that little smarty hush up ? It seems to 
me he might behave on my birthday anyhow." 

"My dear children, what can be the matter ? I never heard you 
quarrel so before. Why, Jack, my dear, you never used to mind 
Bob's teasing at all. I'm ashamed of you !" 

"Now, see what you've done, Sweet Sixteen !" cried Bob. 
A call to the telephone saved Jack the necessity of making a reply. 
She was excited beyond measure to find that Paul Reid, quite the 
handsomest and, with the girls, the most popular boy in town, wanted 
her to go to the dance with him that night. Things were turning 
out nicely after all— why, Paul was twenty years old, and every girl 
in town would be green with envy. She accepted his invitation al- 
most breathlessly. She already had a date with Jim Philips, but 
no matter — she was tired of Jim. She had been to almost every 



16 The St. Mary's Muse 



dance with him since she began "going out." Besides, he was only 
eighteen. She could give him any excuse, and he wouldn't mind. 

"Jack," cried Bob, who had been listening to her conversation, "I 
thought you were going to the dance with Jim ! That's a plain up 
and down dirty trick to play, and going with that sissy Paul Keid, 
too ! I don't see how you girls can stand him. I'm going to get Jim 
to beat him up — he can do it, even if he is only eighteen and Paul's 
twenty." Bob was quite hot ; he resented anything done against his 
hero, Jim Philips. 

Another quarrel was broken up as the voice of Mrs. Pennington 
called, "Bobby, it's time you were going to school — it's ten minutes 
of nine. Kun along, son." So Bobby obediently ran along. 

"Jack, it is time you were going too, even though you have only 
a short distance to go." 

"Just a minute, mother. I want to ask you something. I haven't 
a single thing nice enough to wear to the dance tonight. I'm going 
with Paul Eeid, you know. Can't I get an evening dress down town 
this afternoon — I think I'm old enough to have one now. Ple-e-e-ase, 
mother." 

"My dear child, what is the matter with you ? Why, you never 
used to care a thing about dress. Besides, my dear, it isn't what you 
wear that makes you. Beauty is only skin deep, you know." 

"Yes, yes, mother," impatiently, "but I've never had a real pretty 
dress. Plea-e-e-ease, mother!" 

"Well, I suppose you might as well have one. You father was 
going to give you something you really wanted today, anyhow. He 
meant to tell you to ask for something this morning at the table, but 
he was so annoyed, he quite forgot it. Now run along to school, you 
have just a few minutes." 

At school Jack stood aloof from her companion. How could they 
play such unladylike games? (She forgot that she had been the 
ringleader of those very games just yesterday!) Her comrades 
urged her again and again to join them, then became disgusted and 



The St. Mary's Mtjse 17 



left her alone. "Must have a fit of blues, I reckon," was the conclu- 
sion one of her boon companions finally reached. "Yet she puts on 
such airs, you might suppose she was the Queen of England !" 

As Jack was walking home from school, she met Jim Philips. His 
fine face brightened when he saw her. 

"Why, hello, Jack," he greeted her. "I'm in luck it seems. Here, 
let me take your books." Then, "Goodness, my little pal has sud- 
denly grown up into quite a young lady. Just look at her hair! 
Oh, by the way, Jack, what time shall I call for you tonight ?" 

"I'm sorry, Jim, but I forgot I already had a date when I accepted 
you. Besides, you must be tired of me, I've been with you so much. 
And Jim, I wish you wouldn't talk so about my being grown up— 
you must remember, I'm sixteen." So saying, she turned the corner 
and left him. 

Jim stood stockstill for a few seconds. He was thunderstruck at 
the change in Jack. She usually greeted him so gaily and always 
had such interesting things to say to him. He wondered who it was 
she had a date with— well, he would just go to the dance and find 
out. Nobody should take Jack from him, she always was, and 
always would be, his. 

At eighty-thirty that night Jack gazed at a reflection in the mirror 
of her ideal sixteen-year-old lady. She was well worth looking at, and 
for the first time she realized it. Her bright brown hair was dressed 
high on her head, with a tiny rhinestone hairpin just over her left 
ear. Her new evening dress of turquoise blue lent a deeper shade to 
her eyes. Her shapely little feet were encased in her first high- 
heeled slippers. Little wonder that she smiled ! 

Just then Bob yelled from downstairs, "Jack, Paul's here for you. 
Stop primping and come on down." So Jack went down, wabbling 
rather uncertainly on her new high heels. Bob was waiting for her 
at the foot of the stairs. He burst into a roar of laughter when he saw 
her. Paul came out into the hall as she was standing there. 

"Paul, she sho has dolled up for you," Bob announced. "Will you 
look at those stilts she's walking on? Sis, if I couldn't be more 
graceful, I'd wear tennis shoes, that's a fact!" 



18 The St. Mary's Muse 



Jack longed to slap him, but instead she haughtily ignored him. 
"Come, Paul, I guess we'd better be leaving." 

For a few seconds Paul had gazed at her with a blank expression 
Could this be the little kid he was to escort to the dance? This 
would never do ! He had asked her merely to spite Margy. Now 
the joke was on him sure enough. Margy would never forgive him! 
He finally recovered himself, gasped a few words, and followed Jack 
from the house to his car outside. 

"Oh, Paul," she began, "isn't this the most wonderful night? 
Just look at that heavenly moon ! Oh," she sighed, "wouldn't it be 
just the ideal moon for lovers ?" Jack had spent an hour and a half 
that afternoon reading a book entitled, "How to Entertain Men." 

"It really is a right big moon," was the unromantic reply. Then 
he hastily turned the subject, and put on such speed that his little 
car flew to the dance hall. 

The dance had just begun. Paul, of course, had the first dance 
with Jack ; then he left her in the hands of one of his friends. She 
certainly did not lack partners during the early part of the evening; 
in fact, she had what might be termed a "Grand Rush." Jack had 
created a sensation. Her old friends scarcely recognized her. She 
looked so coolly at the boys her own age with whom she usually 
danced that they steered clear of her. She had not caught a glimpse 
of Jim. After a time, however, she noticed that the same man 
never danced with her twice. Her partners dropped off one by one 
until, after dancing five dances with one man, she realized that she 
was "stuck" for the first time in her life. Now she began to wish 
her hair was down her back and her shoes, those tight, pinchy things, 
were her old, comfortable low-heeled pumps. She was desperate. 
Finally she excused herself on the plea that she must go to the dress- 
ing-room for her handkerchief. She would have sworn her partner 
breathed a sigh of relief. 

Once in the dressing-room Jack had a wild desire to run away from 
it all. There was not another soul in the room. Then she heard 
men's voices coming through the open transom. They were in the 
hall outside. She recognized Paul's voice. 



The St. Mary's Muse 19 



"Ed," he was saying, "I'll do anything for you if you'll take that 
girl home. Margy never will forgive me if she sees me with the 
little fool. I'll never hear the last of it as it is. Why, I only meant 
to kid Margy along a little by bringing Jack, just a kid, you know. 
Jack used to be the best little sport, and one of the sweetest kids I 
k new — that was yesterday, mind you. And here she is tonight, a 
grown up girl, talking mushy moon stuff. Come on, Ed, old man, be 
a sport — take her home!" 

"Sorry, but I have another engagement. That girl tried the moon 
talk on every fellow she danced with tonight. I know, because sev- 
eral of us compared notes. Bye-bye, old top !" 
"Ed," entreatingly, "if you'll take Jack home — " 
"Why, hello, Paul," broke in another voice, which miserable little 
Jack recognized with a thrill of joy as Jim's, "I heard you say you'd 
like somebody to take Miss Pennington home for you. I'll be glad 
to look after her. But — if I ever hear you speak of her in such a way 
again, I'll thrash you !" Jack imagined she could see his gray eyes 
flash as he said it. 

"Ha, ha ! So that's how the land lies, rather sweet on her, eh ? 
Don't let's quarrel now— just take the kid off my hands, then later 
I'll — » But Jim was angry, and they began to quarrel fiercely. 
Jack could stand it no longer. The last shred of her pride was torn 
away. She opened the door of the dressing-room and confronted the 
dumfounded boys. 

The handsome Paul was for once ignored. "Jim," cried Jack, 
"don't quarrel with him— I'm not worth it. Besides, every word he 
said about me is true. You see I heard it all." Then turning to 
Paul, her eyes flashing scornfully, "No, Mr. Keid, you need not see 
me home, and what's more, you need never see me again. Come, 
Jim, let's be going," and they walked off, leaving Paul, for once, 
without a word to say. 

"Let's walk home, Jim," she said as they reached the street. "I've 
so much to say." 

"All right, Jack, what you say goes. But, please, let's not talk 
about tonight. That cad !" 



20 The St. Maby's Muse 



"Jim," with a little choking sob, "will you, can you, ever forgive 
me for telling you that lie this morning ?" 

From the squeeze a soft little hand received from a big brown one 
it seemed that he could. 



Tt)e Unpardonable Accusation 

Louise Egleston, '23 

Mrs. Thomas Johnson, up to her ears in Monday housecleaning, 
looked up in surprise as the door opened and her better half rushed 
in hastily, knocking over vases, umbrella-stands, stools, etc., on his 
way through the disordered living-room. 

"For Heaven's sake, Thomas, what is the matter ?" she called after 
the retreating figure of her husband. 

Eeceiving no answer she dropped her duster and followed him 
upstairs. There he was pitching collars, socks, ties, and shirts on 
to the bed in wild disorder. 

The scene required no explanation and Mrs. Thomas went silently 
to work, deftly persuading four square feet of clean shirts to occupy 
about one square foot of space at the bottom of her husband's small 
hand bag. 

"Big deal on with Roberson in Trenton — Boss can't get away — 
sending me to put it over — train leaving in fifteen minutes," he ex- 
plained between jerks at his troublesome collar and cravat. 

"Will you want something to eat before you go ?" she asked him 
hurriedly. 

"No, but get me a taxi !" 

Mrs. Johnson hurried downstairs and dispatched these last details 
so quickly that she was able to close the door on her husband with 
a sigh of relief, five minutes later. 

Scarcely had she possessed herself of her duster and started back 
to work again when she heard a stealthy tread on the stairs. Who 
could be going upstairs at such a time ? The cook was away, her 
son at school, and she was the only person in the house who had a 



The St. Maky's Muse 21 



right to be there, she told herself. For a minute she stood still, uncer- 
tain what to do. And then marched bravely upstairs after the 

intruder. 

Putting on a bold front, she opened the door of her son's room, 
which was the first at the head of the stairs, and faced— not the 
masked revolvered villain she had expected— but no less than her 
own Thomas Junior. 

He started guiltily and dropped his eyes as she entered. 

"Thomas, what are you doing at home?" his mother demanded 
sternly, scenting trouble. 

"Don't feel so well I" he returned shortly. 

"What's the matter with you? Have you got fever?" feeling his 
head carefully. 

"I don't know. I reckon I'm all right." 

"Well, if you're sick I reckon you're not all right. Go to bed and 
I'll get some castor oil. I guess that's what you need." 

Thomas rebelled at once. "Aw, I don't feel that bad. It ain't 
nothin' much. I'll just lie down." 

"I'll ask Dr. Saunders to stop by and see you. He'll know what's 

the matter." 

The situation was getting rather pressing for Thomas. He hesi- 
tated for words. "I don't want a doctor! I feel all right. Aw 
lemme alone, Mamma!" 

Mrs. Johnson grew suspicious. "Thomas, tell me the truth. 
What made you come home this morning?" she inquired, eyeing him 
sharply. 

Thomas did not answer. 

"Been fighting ?" she urged again. 

He hesitated, then "Just a little, with Dick Burns," he burst out 

at length. 

"And Mr. Lewis sent you home!" she finished triumphantly. 
"Aren't you ashamed of yourself? And then to attempt to deceive 

me!" 

Thomas remained silent. 

"And now, sir, what was the trouble ?" 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 



He looked her full in the face and calmly delivered himself of his 
verdict. "I'm not agoin' to tell !" 

No amount of questioning could bring any more satisfaction from 
the culprit. 

"Well, you stay right here till you decide to answer me, young 
man," she announced and shut the door behind her as she went out 
turning the key in the lock. 

A slightly flurried but determined Mrs. Johnson was admitted to 
the office of the principal of the Maplewood Grammar School half 
an hour later. 

"I'm Mrs. Thomas Johnson and I've come to see about the trouble 
which caused my son's sudden suspension from school today," she 
announced. 

The principal smiled as he drew up a chair for the little lady. 
Evidently she meant business and — well, for that matter he did, too. 

Long and earnestly they talked, but things did not clear up much 
in Mrs. Johnson's mind. 

The principal accompanied her to the door. "I'm very sorry, 
Mrs. Johnson, but I'm sure you see my point. Fighting on the school 
grounds is a suspension offense, and the parties were not equally 
matched. Neither would explain, but I think your son was the 
author of some slur against the little boy's honor. Both were sent 
home," and he politely bowed her out. 

Mrs. Johnson walked quickly down the street. What was to be 
done? Pondering the question thus deeply, she was too much oc- 
cupied to notice a small boy approaching her. Dick Burns was not 
one to be ignored, however, and growled a surly "good morning," at 
the lady. She looked at the child's dirty blouse, tousled hair and 
black eye and decided on the diplomatic course. 

"Tell me what you and Tom got mad about," she coaxed, stopping 
and pulling the child from the edge of the sidewalk. 

"Naw, I ain't either. Let him tell you !" he returned, breaking 
away and running down the street. "Tom's a dirty dog to slander 
me," he shouted back. 



The St. Maky's Muse 23 



"I wonder where he's bound for now. This is so unfortunate !" 
she sighed and started on again. 

At three o'clock the nerve-racked lady answered the loud clanging 
of the bell, and opened the door to face a hot, excited Mr. Kichard 

Burns. 

"Why, good evening." She began in surprise, but Mr. Burns cut 

her short. 

"Mrs. Johnson, I'd like to speak to your husband, please." 

"Why he isn't here right now, but — " 

"Where is he, please?" he cut in again. 

Mrs. Johnson's manner grew chilly. 

"He is out of town today, Mr. Burns. Would you like to leave 

a message ?" ♦ 

"I guess you know what I've come for," he returned, ignoring 
her question. "Do you know anything about Dick?" rather 
belligerently. 

"Dick !" she returned in surprise. 

"Yes, Dick. He hasn't been seen since he was sent home from 
school this morning with your son." 

"How did you know he was sent home ?" she inquired curiously. 

"Quite naturally, I went to the school for my information," was 
the dignified reply. 

"Well, yes, Mr. Burns, I did see Dick this morning on Main 
Street. He was going in the opposite direction, however." 

"I understand he and Tom had a fight. Do you know what the 

trouble was ?" 

"No, I'm sorry, Mr. Burns, but I'm as much in the dark at present 



as you are " 



"Well, I'd just like to know where he is and why he didn't come 

home." 

"Maybe he had good reason," Mrs. Johnson could not help 

suggesting. 

"What do you mean ?" demanded the outraged Mr. Burns. 

"Oh, nothing at all. I hope you find Dick. Good-day, Mr. 
Burns," and she shut the door behind her. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 



After two hours' heated search of the town, Mr. Burns turned 
over the quest of Dick to two police officers and presented himself 
again at Mrs. Johnson's door. 

"Mrs. Johnson, this is a serious affair, and I demand Mr. John- 
son's return to assume his share of responsibility, if only as Thomas's 
father," he said calmly, and took his leave. 

Poor Mrs. Johnson, visibly worried, wired her husband, and while 
waiting for his return tried to extract a confession from Thomas. In 
vain she begged to know the cause of the trouble, and finally ended by 
locking Tom in his room again and threatening dire punishment 
upon the return of his father. 

At nine o'clock a silent trio might have been seen making its way 
down the street in the direction of the Burns' home— Mr. Johnston, 
stern and uncommunicative, though inwardly worried over the state 
of his unfinished business ; Mrs. Johnson on the verge of tears, but 
biting her lips to keep them back ; and Tom, as silent, surly, scowling 
and obstinate as ever. Mr. Burns and his wife, worried and un- 
nerved to the point of utter collapse, received them and the two men 
went at once to the point. 

"This is a very unfortunate affair indeed, Mr. Burns, and espe- 
cially so for me, as I was recalled in the midst of important busi- 
ness," began Mr. Johnson. 

"I beg leave to consider that I have the greater cause for anxiety, 
Mr. Johnson. You may be aware that my son has been missing since 
noon." 

"So I am informed. And I am prepared to do all in my power to 
help you find him." 

"The police are at work. If you don't mind, I should like an 
explanation from your son. His assault on Dick was unwarranted." 

"Though that is scarcely worth arguing about now, Mr. Burns. 
I think you are hardly competent to judge. You don't know that 
Tom started it." 

"I didn't," put in Tom from the sofa, and shut up again like an 
oyster. 

"There now, Mr. Burns," Mr. Johnson spoke triumphantly. 

"Do you expect me to take his word ?" Mr. Burns demanded. 



The St. Majby's Muse 25 



"I'd like to know why not I" returned the father of the party under 
discussion, hotly. "It's all you have to take. At least till Dick turns 
up to contradict it," he added. 

Dick's mother, sitting in the corner, dabbed at her eyes with her 
moist handkerchief. 

"Well, whoever started it, he made Dick run away," stormed the 
irate Mr. Burns. 

"Look here, I move we cut out this talking and do something to 
recover the lost property," Mr. Johnson suggested wisely. 

"Come, come, now, man ! Make this boy talk !" Mr. Burns de- 
manded, indicating Thomas, sitting gloomily on the sofa with his 
anxious mother. 

"Humph ! Make him talk yourself. You can lead a — " 
"Well, I'll give you just five minutes to get something out of 
him," taking out his watch. 

Mr. Johnson crossed the room. "Wow look here, Burns," he said 
threateningly, "there are ladies — " 

Here he was interrupted by the entrance of an officer of the law, 
accompanied by the prodigal Dick himself, dirty, shamefaced and 
rebellious, but sticking it out like a hero. 

"Found on a north-bound train at Hampton," announced the 
officer, and bowed himself out. 

Dick's mother, her eyes suspiciously bright, endeavored to take her 
boy in her arms. He was not to be petted, however, and broke away. 
Shaking his dirty first at Tom he turned to his father, who had 
collapsed in relief on the nearest chair. 

"I fought him," he said defiantly, "and I'd do it again if — if — " 
Here his courage weakened, his resolve was shattered. He made 
a valiant attempt to go on but failed and sobbed bitterly on his 
mother's shoulder for a few minutes. 

"Tell mother, darling," she whispered, "tell mother what he said." 
A great wail broke the tense silence. 

"Oh, mamma," he sobbed, "Tom said — he — he — he said — lie said 
I had ancestors I" 



26 The St. Mary's Muse 



How We Do IT 

Lenoee PowexXi, '23 

A bell, sharp and clear, pierced the cold morning air. A pair of 
sleepy brown eyes opened reluctantly, then, blinded by a cheerfully 
officious sun's rays, hastily closed. Ellen, half audibly, called out 
from the depths of her blankets, "Your turn at the window, Dot! 
Tough luck, old girl. Make it snap — " These last words were 
barely mumbled, trailing off at length into nothingness, as Ellen fell 
into untroubled slumber. 

Dorothy, thus roused, turned over luxuriously in her friendly 
warm bed. Then, as though forced by unseen powers, she crawled 
unwillingly out, shiveringly crossed the floor in bare feet, shut the 
window with a reckless bang, and, thus thoroughly awakened, ran 
breathlessly back, diving once again under the covers. 

Silence. Blissful sleep. Nay, but not for long. Ere many weary 
minutes had ticked themselves away on their endless journey, a sec- 
ond bell, more insistent than before, called the happy ones from an 
unreal dreamland to a very real, prosaic world. 

It was not a bell to be trifled with. Its su mm ons was unquestion- 
able. With dismayed shrieks Ellen and Dot bounded from their 
beds. Followed thereupon a mad rush. As few clothes as their 
maidenly modesty deemed proper were thrown on in excited haste. 
Stockings were pulled on and knotted beneath their knees. Un- 
combed hair was twisted into insecure knots. Finally, careless dabs 
of powder, applied to unwashed noses, completed their toilettes. 
Flinging on sweaters, they darted from the room. 

Several seconds later, two girls slip into the dining-room just 
before the doors are closed. They grin in triumphant relief. They 
have made it ! 



The St. Mary's Mttse 27 



The Typical New Girl and When She's an Old Girl 

Dorothy Kirtland, '21 

A typical New Girl 

Carries on an extensive correspondence and takes more interest in 
her mailbox than anything else in school. 

Stocks up in groceries every Monday and Thursday and every 
other time she gets the chance. 

Pays attention in Assembly. 

Goes to town every Monday. 

Talks incessantly about the narrow escapes she has. 

Uses "marvelous," "cute" and "crazy about it" most extravagantly. 

Is very much interested in Crushes. 

Wouldn't come back next year for love or money. 

But when she's an Old Girl she 

Writes only to the family and intimate friends, and frequently 
not to them. 

Is always "broke." 

Studies her lessons in Assembly. 

Goes to town when there's something to go for, and only then if 
she can't send some one else. 

Feels a sublime disregard for the rules and regulations of which 
she stood, when new, in mortal terror. 

Still uses "marvelous," "cute" and "crazy about it." 

Laughs good-naturedly at Crushes, or else goes in for them stronger 
than ever. 

Talks about how grand St. Mary's was last year, and 

Wouldn't miss being back next year for love or money. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price - Two Dollars 

Single Copies ' Twenty-five Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1919-20 
Mary T. Yellott, '20, Editor-in-Chief 
Catharine Miller, '20 Catharine Boyd, '20 

Crichton Thorne, '23 Mabel Norfleet, '23 

Frances Venable, '22 Louise Powell, '22 

Jane Ruffin, '20, Business Manager 
Ernest Cbuikshank, Faculty Director 



EDITORIAL 

Lent is now well on its way, a solemn season, more solemn, of 
course, to some than to others. Lent, to some, means little more than 
a time when there is no dancing in the Parlor ; when there is Chapel 
on Tuesday and Thursday evenings and none on Wednesday and 
Friday, when there are voluntary services at odd hours which it is 
possible to avoid; a time when one "gives up" those delicacies one 
craves — candy, it may be, and sugar in one's coffee ; or possibly one 
is yet more nobly self-sacrificing and eats the things one at other 
times disdains — hash, perhaps, and "butter." 

But Lent is -more than this. It is not our purpose to go into its 
deeper meaning. We have most of us been brought up in homes 
where the Lenten season is observed in one way or another; and all 
of us are familiar with its principles. But we should like to make 
a few suggestions as to a thoroughly practical way of "keeping Lent." 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 



After all, its final object is to bring us to the joyous Easter season 
a little more fit than we were before, and in this purpose, eating or 
not eating candy and butter is only incidental. 

Less general, perhaps, but more helpful is the practice of trying, 
especially during Lent, to break ourselves of those little habits that 
develop almost unconsciously and then cling most tenaciously; the 
mean little habit of saying horrid catty things about people behind 
their backs, or of saying cutting things to their faces ; the habit of 
forgetting promises and of telling secrets with never a thought of the 
real sacredness of a confidence. Lent is as good a time as the New 
Year for making resolutions, and an even better time for keeping 
them. It is easier to stick to a good resolution for forty days than 
for three hundred and sixty-five, and Mite Boxes afford an excellent 
spur. Of course, it's harder to keep a resolution if there is no pen- 
alty attached to breaking it. And you'll find it a gentle reminder to 
guard against that slip of the tongue if each time you forget you pay 
a forfeit to your Lent Box. 

We ought to have a splendid offering from these little boxes this 
year anyhow, since, due to the quarantine, there are so few tempta- 
tions to spend money on other things. 

The Quarantine ! It's an awful bore, of course, but after all, like 
spats and Chapel caps, it's for our own good, and there's no use 
fussing about it and making every one else miserable just because 
you are dissatisfied. There's another chance for a Lenten resolution. 
How about dropping a nickel in that little yawning slot every time 
you grumble about something that can't be helped ? It's wearing on 
the disposition, your own and those around you, and— every nickel 
helps ! 



30 The St. Maby's Muse 



SCHOOL NEWS 



January 31— Tr;e Dutch Tea 

"A Dutch Tea in the Muse Eoom Tonight" was announced by an 
attractive poster on the bulletin board Saturday morning, Janu- 
ary 31st. The poster, a Holland landscape done in blue and white, 
created quite a sensation, and many were the compliments showered 
on Nancy Lay when the secret leaked out, as secrets always will, that 
she had painted it in half an hour ! The hungry girls who nocked 
around it gave gusty sighs and glanced at watches as if with the 
desire of speeding Father Time up a bit. 

Long before the appointed hour for the opening of the Tea Eoom, 
the crowd began to collect in the hall and in the neighboring class 
rooms. When the door opened at last, there was a wild scramble for 
tables. The expectations aroused by the poster were fully realized by 
the scene within. The blue and white covers on the tables, the Dutch 
pictures on the wall, and the decorations in general, all combined to 
give a most "Dutchified" effect. Dainty Dutch maidens tripped in 
and out of the room, bearing nourishment in the shape of chicken 
salad, hot chocolate, ice cream, etc., to their famished customers. 

In the midst of the excitement, the members of the Orchestra ap- 
peared, late but smiling, and costumed as little Dutch boys. Under 
the able leadership of Nancy Lay they coaxed forth sweet sounds 
from their miscellaneous instruments, producing the ever-popular 
"music-while-you-eat. " 

From a business standpoint, the Muse Club reports that the Tea 
was quite a success, and judging from the comments heard after- 
wards, it was equally as successful as an entertainment. 

F. P. V. 

February 7— The Return Class Parties 

On Saturday evening, February 7th, the Sophomores entertained 
their sister class, the Seniors, at a Valentine Party. The Muse 
Koom was very attractively decorated with hearts and other frills 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



betokening the presence of St. Valentine. Bookie Lasater's "1920" 
done in hearts well deserved the admiration and appreciation it won 
from the Seniors. 

The Entertainment Committee, with Marietta Gareissen as chair- 
man, assisted by Fielding Douthat and Josephine Rose, presented a 
very amusing contest in the shape of a Valentine telegram, using 
the letters of the word "Valentine." The most original of the tele- 
grams were read aloud, the prize being awarded to Jane Toy, who 
submitted the following startling bit of information and advice: 
"To the University of Worth Carolina: — Vamps are loose. En- 
deavor not to introduce needless entertainment." There was hidden 
pathos in Katherine Batts' telegram as from a New York relative 
to the entire family : "Van ate Lemon Extract November tenth. I 
need everybody." An "adjectiveless" description of the Seniors 
coming to breakfast was written for the occasion by Fielding Dou- 
that, and each person present contributed an adjective. Then the 
complete composition was read, to the amusement of all and espe- 
cially of the Seniors as they heard the adjectives, complimentary 
and otherwise, applied to the members of their class, and had a 
chance to see themselves as others, all too often, see them ! 

A salad course that was truly a Valentine was served by the Re- 
freshment Committee, with Louise Powell at its head, assisted by 
Elizabeth Hale and Jane McMillan. Tiny little red hearts decorated 
the delicious pineapple salad with which chocolate and Marguerites 
were served. 

At last when "the winks" warned us that we must be up and away, 
the Seniors and Sophomores matched hearts, and the Sophs proved 
to be as charming escorts as they were hostesses. 

C. M. M. 

Meanwhile, upstairs in the Parlor, the Freshmen were heartily 
entertaining the Juniors. The whole room was in a rosy glow and 
hearts of every size had somehow found a resting place in most ef- 
fective spots. A "Romance Contest" was very appropriately won 
by Nancy Hart, and the fortunate winners of the Lucky Number 
Dance were Marjory Nixon and Madge Blakely. 



32 The St. Maky's Muse 



After popular refreshments of ice cream cones, mints and cakes 
had been enjoyed by all except those in training for the game Monday 
night, dancing was the order of the hour until the faithful 9 :30 bell 
announced that Eomance was at an end and in its place stern Eeality 
had resumed her accustomed sway. 

M. ST. 



February 9 — Fifteen Points for the Mus 

Excitement reigned supreme on Monday, the 9th of February, the 
evening of the second doubleheader between the First and Third 
Teams. At 8 :15 the Gym, newly decorated with the Mu champion- 
ship banners for the last two years, was filled with a cheering throng 
of Mus and Sigmas. "Linesmen, timekeepers, scorekeepers !" Miss 
Bierce's voice rang out, silencing for the moment the new songs and 
yells. 

Then the First Team game began. It was fast and furious, a fight 
to the very finish. At the end of the first half the score stood four 
points in favor of the Sigmas, but the Mus picked up in the last, and 
when the final whistle sounded no one was certain just how matters 
stood. For one tense second there was utter silence. Then the 
scorekeepers announced the score 20 to 19 in the Sigmas' favor, 
leaving the First Teams tied at one all. Quick dribbling character- 
ized the Sigma side and pretty pass work the Mu. Mary Bryan 
Wimberly, subbing in the center for Harriet Barber, played a splen- 
did game, and Mary Hoke's beautiful field shots repeatedly called 
forth the Sigmas' triumphant cheer for "Moke." 



Following was 


the line 


-up: 




Sigma 






Mu 


Toy ) 
Boyd j 




. Centers 


j Kent 

1 Wimberly 


Hoke ) 
Underwood f 




. Forwards 


j McCabe 
"j Yellott 


Cooper ) 
Everett \ 






j Ruffin 

1 Glass — Venable 



The St. Mary's Muse 33 



The Third Team game was equally as exciting. Bessie Brown, 
the Mu star in the last Fourth Team game, was up to her old tricks, 
but Eebecca Cole proved almost a match for her. In spite of Mary 
Wiatt Yarborough's vigorous guarding, however, the Mus came off 
victorious, not only with a score of 39 to 35, but with the Third 
Team Championship. 



Mu 



The line-up was as follows : 

Sigma 

Batts ) Centers j f^T 

Smart ( / Bublett 



C°l e / Forwards 



Thompson f / Gareissen 



Brown 



Yarborough ) Guards 



Roberson ( i Lenoir 

C. B. 



Fitts 



February 17— The Colonial Ball 

With Miss Sutton at the piano on Tuesday evening, February 
17th, the last evening of dancing before the Lenten quiet settled 
down upon St. Mary's according to time-honored custom, the Colonial 
Ball was thrown into full swing as a stately line of be-powdered 
dames and gentlemen marched into the Parlor. Blushing little 
maids in dimity and handsome damsels in satin smiled artfully at 
their cavalier companions clad in knee-breeches, silken coats, and 
frilly jabots. Led by "Master" Cooley and Mistress Wimberly, the 
procession went through the measures of the Grand March, the ladies 
and gentlemen receiving little patriotic favors as they passed the 
matronly Dame Lay and her partner, Lord Stone. Then it melted 
into couples and the dancing began in earnest. George Washington 
from his flag-bedecked picture over the mantelpiece seemed to smile 
down upon the gay throng whirling around beneath him, and his 
smile broadened when Dame Lay announced that the next dance 
would be a "George Washington," which turned out to be only a 
good old Paul Jones renamed for the occasion. 



34 The St. Mary's Muse 

After almost an hour of dancing, refreshments were served by 
some of the Colonial gentlemen, turned butlers for the moment. The 
delicious ice cream and "Colonial Curls" were partaken of with great 
enthusiasm. Next came a Contest Dance, and Sir M. Huske and 
his partner, Mistress Ballard, were the successful contestants. Even 
with a few extra minutes allowed us, the final march came all too 
soon, and with many regretful sighs the ladies swept out on the arms 
of their suitors. 

Thus ended one of the most popular events of the school year, and 
one of the most successful Colonial Balls of many years. 

F. P. V. 



February 14 — The Dramatic Club Presents "Cousin Kate?' 

On the last Saturday night before Lent, the Dramatic Club gave 
its annual mid-year play, this time Hubert Henry Davies' three-act 
comedy, "Cousin Kate." Always a popular event in the school year, 
the play was well attended and the general spirit at the sound of the 
bell seemed to be "Come early and get in the rush." The Bohemian 
Band of increasing fame, led by Bene Glass, helped while away the 
tense minutes both before the curtain rose and between the acts, 
though these intervals were almost professionally brief and spoke 
well for the systematic teamwork going on behind the scenes. 

There were but seven characters in the play, and under Miss Davis' 
careful training, they had worked up their parts to a perfection 
hardly to be criticized. Those who had seen Millicent Blanton as 
the hero of previous plays were rather disappointed on hearing that 
she was to take a woman's part this time, but from the minute the 
door in the rear opened and Cousin Kate appeared, an utterly fasci- 
nating woman-of-the-world, all such regrets were forgotten and 
"Milly" as the heroine rivaled the memory of "Milly" as the hero. 
She was at her invariable best, and played the part of Cousin Kate 
with all her usual clash and vim. "Cooley" made a perfect hero and 
the love scenes sent thrill after thrill through the sympathetic audi- 
ence, moving many even to tears. Dorothy Kirtland was splendid as 



The St. Mart's Muse 35 



the worried Mamma, a character part in which "Pussy" had an op- 
portunity to display her unusual dramatic ability in that direction. 

The cast of the play was as follows : 

Characters 

Heath Desmond Mildred Cooley 

Rev. James Bartlett Jane ToY 

Bobby Spencer Mary Louise Everett 

Mrs. Spencer Dorothy Kirtland 

Amy Spencer Fielding Lewis Douthat 

Jane Rebecca Hastings Cole 

Kate Curtis Millicent Blanton 

The action takes place in a rural district of England and covers a period 
of five hours. 

Acts I and III. Drawing-room at Mrs. Spencer's. 

Act II. Sitting-room at "Owlscot." 



February 15— The "Living Pictures" 

Miss Fenner and her Art pupils brought before the delighted eyes 
of St. Mary's on Sunday, February 15th, a series of "living pic- 
tures," the masterpieces of great artists of all times. The announce- 
ment was made Sunday evening that the Art Department would 
entertain us in the Studio, forbidden sanctum, after supper, and, 
like the little Euggleses entering the gates of heaven, at the appointed 
hour we trooped in. 

At one end of the Art Koom there was a screened and curtained 
partition over which certain of the taller guests caught fleeting 
glimpses of dunce caps, high coiffures and be-plumed bonnets. A 
large picture frame, gracefully draped with green curtains, was the 
central point of interest. Lois Bell and Hope Eccles, in bloomers, 
smocks and tarns, drew back the curtains and we exclaimed in delight 
and astonishment at the picture before us, The Age of Innocence. 
The delicate and artistic touches were all there, and surely the picture 
must have been alive had not a move betrayed the fact. Each pic- 



36 The St. Mary's Muse 



ture was presented in its original colors. Miss Tenner gave short 
and instructive lectures on the lives of each of the masters repre- 
sented. 

The program was as follows : 

The Age of Innocence Martina Carr 

Duchess of Devonshire Alice Cheek 

The Laughing Cavalier Miliicent Blanton 

The Broken Pitcher Lenore Powell 

Vegie LeBrun and Daughter D. Drew and H. Newberry 

Pierrot Josephine Rose 

Princes in the Tower D. and A. Kirtland 

Holland Maid Callie Mae Roberson 

Whistler's Mother Mary Powell 

Puritan Maid Margaret Elliott 

Spanish Student Frances Venable 

The general burst of applause and the genuine appreciation of 
the audience persuaded the "living pictures" to pose a second time 
for our benefit and, being better acquainted, this second time was 
perhaps even more enjoyable than the first. 

C. T. 



February 16— The Fashion Show 

Mary Bryan Wimberly, President of the St. Margaret's Chapter, 
keenly interpreted the workings of the feminine mind when she 
chose a Progressive Fashion Show to entertain us on Monday after- 
noon, February 16th. With the help of Miss Neave and the willing 
members of her Chapter, Mary Bryan arranged and carried off suc- 
cessfully a program of fascinating interest. 

Dark screens at one end of the Parlor formed the background for 
a veritable exhibition room. In the center was an opening with a 
tier of green-carpeted steps, down which the "model" tripped — or 
glided, according to her day and time — while Miss Ebie at the piano, 
assisted by Estelle Avent, lent "atmosphere" in a most pleasing way. 

Conspicuous among the models of an earlier day were Mary Hoke, 
as Queen Elizabeth, and Patty Sherrod, as the coquettish Hoopskirt 



The St. Mary's Muse 37 



Maid. Jessie Keith scored a triumph as "The Vamp," and Laura 
Underwood as the Bathing Suit Girl. Dorothy Blount and Dorothy 
Baum appeared to good advantage, one in a dashing street costume 
and the other in a snappy riding habit. While Miss Ebie played 
"School Days," Maurine Moore and Ellen Lewis strolled leisurely 
before us in girlish ginghams, to be followed by Lucy London Ander- 
son and Irene Grimsley in evening dresses. Then, as the strains of 
the Wedding March pealed forth, came Florence Aiken, resplendent 
in white satin, and attended by Kuth Andrews and Alice Walker as 
Bridesmaids. After their withdrawal the music changed to 
"In a Grove of Stately Oaktrees," and there was a general tendency 
to rise, which was, however, restrained under the circumstances in 
courtesy to those in the rear, who clamored, with good reason, to see 
the funny little figure who now appeared. It was Sarah Irwin, the 
typical St. Mary's Girl, ready to take her exercise on a damp day, 
but well shielded from the inclemency of the weather by a heavy 
sweater, fastened with a leather belt, a Chapel Cap, gloves, spats, 
rubbers, and an umbrella. Truly beautiful, for did not Keats hold 
that "Beauty is truth, truth beauty"? 

This was a fitting climax to the Fashion Show, but there was a 
moment of stillness as if something further was expected. After 
a second's pause Margaret Kawlings took the floor, and amid wild 
applause read the results of the Statistics vote taken just after lunch. 
The last number on the program was Dancing — Open to All, and all 
with one accord took advantage of the invitation. 



February 21— Second and Fourth Team Series Tied 

The second of the series of Second and Fourth Team games came 
off Saturday, February 21st. Mus and Sigmas were out in full 
force, with all their pep, and all signs pointed to an exciting evening. 
~Nor were they wrong. Both teams were well matched, and from the 
first to the final whistle, there was not a dull minute. 

The Second Teams were the first to take the field, and it was at 
once evident that both were out to win. Kebecca Cole and Bessie 
Brown were so capably held down by Mary Bryan Wimberly and 



38 The St. Mary's Muse 



Dorothy Baum that at the end of the first half the score stood 10 to 9 
in the Signias' favor. In the second half the Mus made up the miss- 
ing point, and both sides played evenly until, at the sound of Patty 
Sherrod's emphatic whistle, the score was announced a tie ! The ball 
was immediately put in play for the deciding goal, and every nerve 
was strained to the snapping point. The suspense was mercifully 
short — a quick twist of one hand, and the Mu cheers rang out for 
Bessie Brown. So the game ended, 19 to 17, leaving the Second 
Team Championship to be decided by their next encounter. 

Following is the line-up for the game : 

Sigma Mu 

!; K -^ ayl0r I Centers (Nelson 

E. Collier ij < Ashworth 

Cole ) in j ( Brown 

Forwards 



S. Collier j 1 Edmundson— Venable 

f aU1 * l Guards j Wimberly 

Smythe j > Villepigue 

The Fourth Teams, while not displaying the same pretty playing 
as the Second, were equally well matched, and their game was no 
less exciting. Both sides had several new players on the field, all of 
whom were a credit to their colors. The Mxon Twins, one playing 
Forward and the other Guard, did good work, and Lois Dunnock, 
the new Mu Forward, contributed her share towards the final score, 
which was, however, in spite of her, 18 to 15 in favor of the Sigmas. 
This left the Fourth teams tied, and if the members live through the 
final Second Team game, their fate will be decided in the next fifteen 
minutes. 

The line-up was as follows : 

Sigma Mu 

Smart ) Centerg ( Gresham 



Ballou j 1 Sabiston 

M. Nixon ) ^ , f Lav 

T .„ I Forwards J ■ Lld,y 

Lilly j 1 Dunnock 

l e ^ eS n I Guards j James 

Battle — D. Nixon I 1 Fitts 

C. M. M. 



The St. Mary's Muse 39 



Items of Interest 

During the Quarantine, since it was impossible for the girls to get 
out on Thursday afternoons as usual, like the mountain to Mohamet, 
the "Little Store" had to be brought to them. St. Catherine's Chap- 
ter of the Junior Auxiliary introduced the idea on Monday, Febru- 
ary 2d, and the following week it was taken up by the Kate McKim- 
mon Chapter. The proceeds were to be given to the Near-East 
Eelief Fund, and so well was the "Store" conducted by Nancy Lay 
and Louise Powell, assisted by the members of their Chapters, that 
St. Mary's was able to turn over a very creditable sum to this worthy 
cause. 

The long-threatened arrangement of the Chapel Line according to 
height actually took place on Monday afternoon, February 2d. The 
last two rows are still reserved for the Seniors, who, seated strictly 
according to height, are led out by Mary Hoke and Sara Davis. 
Mary Powell heads the rest of the School, and Virginia Jordan and 
Marguerite Darst bring up the rear. The Choir proved the only 
insurmountable obstacle to this aesthetic plan, but as Sopranos and 
Altos do not go by feet and inches, the end of the line is an unex- 
pected jumble of Mutts and Jeffs. Unpopular as the plan was when 
first suggested, it is now generally admitted that the Chapel Line has 
been much improved by it. 

Impromptu debates of unusual interest made up the program of 
both Literary Societies on Tuesday evening, February 10th. The 
point of dispute was: "Resolved, That in furthering the good of 
St. Mary's, Chapel Caps are a greater factor than Spats." As the 
Affirmative won in the Sigma Lambda and the Negative in the 
E. A. P. Society, the problem remains to be solved by Experience. 

Mrs. Perkins delightfully entertained the members of the Dra- 
matic Club in her room just after the Play on Saturday evening, 
February 14th. 



40 The St. Mart's Muse 



At the Sunday night meeting of the Muse Club, February 15th, 
the following new members were welcomed: Misses Kent, Nolan, 
Dougherty, Budge, Gareissen, Edmundson, Carrigan, Douthat, New- 
man, MacMillan and Pegues. With such reinforcements, the Muse 
Club hopes to get out an Annual that will forever answer the ques- 
tion, "What's the use of Pay Day ?" 

With the six o'clock service Friday afternoon, February 20th, the 
regular Lenten services were begun. On Fridays Mr. Way is speak- 
ing on some of the great Christian saints and on Wednesdays his 
address is on some of the great thoughts of the Christian religion. 

Mrs. Marriott this year chose Washington's Birthday as the occa- 
sion of her Surprise Supper. A miniature representation of the 
cherry tree episode testified to the combined skill of Miss Fenner 
and Mrs. Marriott, and the delicious supper was enjoyed by all, the 
more from the fact of its being totally unexpected. 

The first of the Lenten Mission Study Classes were held on Sun- 
day evening, February 22d. There are three of these classes, con- 
ducted by Mrs. Way, Susan Collier and Annie Duncan, and Kath- 
erine Batts and Mary Hoke. The leaders have chosen interesting 
subjects for the classes, and all are welcome to attend. 

Having caught the germ of the girls' enthusiasm, the Faculty have 
organized two Basketball teams and are planning a game, the pro- 
ceeds from which are to be included in the Lenten offering. Judging 
from all indications, the game will be well attended. 

The Literary Societies opened the series of preliminary debates 
on Wednesday evening, February 25th. The Sigma Lambdas dis- 
cussed the question of the reelection of President Wilson, in which 
Lena Simmons and Frances Venable, of the Negative, succeeded in 
downing their opponents, Dorothy Baum and Bebecca Cole. The 
query chosen by the E. A. P. debaters was not quite so deep, but was 



St. Maky's Muse 41 

I equal interest, "Kesolved, That St. Mary's should have inter- 
scholastic rather than intersociety athletics." Here, too, the Nega- 
tive, upheld by Kebecca Hines and Elizabeth Nolan, won out over 
Evelina Beckwith and Josephine Dixon. 

With this number, issued by the E. A. P. Society, the second Muse 
Contest is ended. The Mid-Winter and Early Spring numbers will 
be submitted to outside judges as before, and the decision published 
in the next issue. There remains but one number to be gotten out 
by each Society. This may be the deciding item in the Contest, and 
both sides have evidently gone out to win. 



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JEWELRY 



28 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



MLLON SUPPLY GO. 

ALL KINDS OF 
MACHINERY 

Where Quality Reigns Supreme 
RALEIGH. N. C. 



WALKER ELECTRIC SHOP 

WEST MARTIN STREET 



Luto Tire Repair Co. SK** -6 * 

108 WEST DAVIE STREET 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co.. Proprietoi s 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



T. R. WORKMAN 

Wall Paper and 
Interior Decorating 

SOUTH WILMINGTON STREET 



KOONCE FURNITURE STORE 

111 East Harftet St. 

CHEAPEST PLACE 



EFIRD'S 

"SELL IT FOR LESS" 

Full lines of Ready- to- Wear, Silks, Shoes, Piece Goods, 
Toilet Articles, Gloves, Etc. 



See us for PORCH FURNITURE 
Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 

FAYETTEVILLE, STREET 



B. R.Hale&Bro.^:a h P :; SHOES 

17 EAST MARTIN STREET 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 



Patronize 
STAUDT'S BAKERY 

Hillsboro Street, Near St. Mary's 
School 



WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 

BELL PHONE 503 

SHU-FIXERT 

J. R. KEE, Manager 103 Fayetteville St. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Shoes repaired while you wait. 

Come to see our modern plant 



L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOKD MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STOKE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons Base Balls > Basket Balh 

The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. Tennis and Sporting Goods 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Comer Blount and Morgan Streets. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 

HAYNES & WEATHERS 

LADY FLORISTS Phone 399 



Call OLIYE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

T. B. GILL,, Manager at Station 

Phone 629 

W. L. BROGDEN & GO. 

WHOLESALE FRUITS 
Wilmington Street Raleigh, N. C. 



Would-be Songster — "You know, I often find myself almost un- 
consciously breaking into song." 

The Songster ( wither ingly) — "If you could find the key occa- 
sionally, maybe you wouldn't have to break in." 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 



Bell Phone 135 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

FINE CANDIES PURE ICE CREAM 
FRUIT 

We carry the most complete line of Fruit and 

Candies in town. 

Ill FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

JOHNSON COAL & ICE CO. 



109 West Martin Street 



Phone 457 



H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

RALEIGH, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 

Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. . 



Caviness' Grocery 

Everything Good to Eat 

HELLSBORO STREET 



Cfje 

^aleigf), JJ. C. 



Spring Jlumtier 

iWartJ, 1920 



CONTENTS 

Literary Department: page 

"Spring Fever" Crichton Thome 3 

The Way of a Maid With a Man Katherine Waddell 4 

Food Rainsford Glass 12 

Infirmary Blues Crichton Thome 17 

A Romance of the Sea L. L. Anderson 18 

An Uncomfortable Hour Rainsford Glass 23 

Fire Drill Mary Hoke 29 

Chapel Line Florida Kent 30 

Editorial 32 

School News 34 

Items of Interest 41 

Advertisements 43 



The St. Mary's Muse 

SPRING NUMBER 



Vol. XXV March, 1920 No. 6 

LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by The Sigma Lambda Literary Society 

Editors 

Mary Moffitt Catherine Miller 

Lucy London Anderson 



"Sprir>g Fever" 

Ceichton Thoene 

Ain't exactly happy and ain't exactly blue, 

Ain't exactly caring, but I'm caring some for true. 

Ain't exactly longing, but something's missing there — 
Can't exactly figure if it's me or in the air. 

Ain't exactly sunny, yet it don't look like rain, 
Seems to me skies is so set they'll never change again. 

Ain't exactly lonesome, but a friend would help along 
T'wards stirring up the greyness and lending it a song. 

Ain't exactly natural, yet it's undecided, too, 

All the scales is needing for to balance right is — you. 



The St. Maby's Muse 



The Way of a Maid With a Man 

Kathebine Waddeix, '21 

"On de udder side ob Jordan, 

In de sweet fiel's ob Eden/' 
sang Aunt Tilly at the top of her lungs. The dishes rattled in the 
warm soap suds, the kettle on the stove sang merrily, and the cat 
dozing in the warm sunlight, purred contentedly. 

"There is rest for the weary, 

There is rest for the weary !" 
Mary Ann joined in the refrain, and for a few minutes the two 
voices and the clatter of the dishes were the only sounds heard in the 
cheerful little kitchen. 

"Miss Mary Ann !" The singing stopped abruptly. " Look at that 
pestiferous cat. He's gwine git dem croquettes, sho's you're born, 
if'n you don' keep yer eye on 'im. Look out, you'se gwine trip on 
'im ! Scat !" Aunt Tilly's comfortable form bestirred itself to scarf 
off the inquisitive cat. Coming back into the room, she paused neai 
the table where Mary Ann, her hair disarranged and a smudge oJ 
flour on her nose, mixed with an assured hand a large bowl of fluff} 
yellow substanace. 

"Dat's fine, honey," Aunt Tilly beamed, "Add a speck mo' cream 
an' de seasonin', an' it'll be ready to go in de oven. Law, but yo 
ma'll be pround ob dis heah dinnah, an' dem boarders'll be ticklec 
plum to death." 

"Do you reckon they will, Aunt Tilly ?" Mary Ann asked anxious 
ly. "We've just got to keep them ! If we can only pull through th< 
summer, I can support mother next winter by teaching. Did yor 
put fresh flowers in the dining-room, and put an extra place at th< 
table ? You know, a new boarder came this morning." 

"Yes'm, I done it. Ebery thing looks fine. I seen dat new mai 
dis mornin', an' he sho' is a nice gemman. I was dustin' his roon 
an' jes' lookin' at de pitcher ob a smilin' young lady settin' on di 
dresser, when he come walkin' in, lookin' foh his tennis racket, hi 
say. He was real pleasant, askin' 'bout de people 'round heah 



The St. Mary's Muse 



He say he wuz gwine stay awhile if'n we'd keep him. Den he went 
out, an' I seen him walkin' towards de court wid dat fuzzy-headed 
Miss Dixon. What you say his name wuz, honey ?" 

''He's Mr. John Marshal." Mary Ann, who had been guilty of 
neglecting her cake to listen, resumed her stirring with renewed 
vigor. "But this isn't getting dinner, Aunt Tilly," she remon- 
strated. "Put some wood in the stove, and let's get this cake in, 
then start making the biscuits." 

"Lawd hab mercy, it's nearly ten o'clock, an' de parlor ain't been 
dusted yet!" Aunt Tilly seized a pan and turned toward the store- 
room, while Mary Ann brushed the flour off her apron, tied a towel 
around her head, and disappeared in the direction of the parlor. 

John Marshal, tennis racket in hand and an irritated scowl on 
his brow, threw open the front door noisily. 

Why in the world were girls always so inconsistent ? Here he'd 
put himself out to be nice to the curly-headed Miss Dixon because 
she had seemed to be homesick, and in need of cheering up, but no 
sooner had they gotten down to the tennis courts than she had uncere- 
moniously deserted him for a chap in a panama hat who plainly 
didn't care to play tennis. Wasn't that just like a girl ? He slammed 
the door, and said something naughty under his breath. 

"Come down to Kew in lilac-time, in lilac-time," a high sweet 
voice near at hand caroled gayly. 

Marshal looked up at the ceiling, down at the floor and out of 
the window. Where did the voice come from? Oh, he had it, the 
door to the left. He tiptoed quietly over and cautiously opened it. 
A small figure enveloped in a big blue checked apron was down on 
its knees, dusting vigorously the legs of the piano seat. A grotesque 
head-dress almost hid the wavy brown hair, but an elusive strand 
insisted on slipping from beneath the towel and caressing a very 
pink cheek. The pink cheek looked as if it might have a dimple 
lurking near the merry mouth, and Marshal was considering this 
possibility when the figure turned and faced toward the door. A 



The St. Mary's Muse 



pair of wide gray eyes looked up into his and a dusty little hand 
reached up hastily to hide the truant wisp of hair. 

"W-who are you?" stammered an amazed little voice. 

"My name is John Marshal, but who in the deuce are you ?" 

"I — I'm the m-maid, please, sir." 

"The maid!" he exclaimed aloud. "Pretty maid, by Jove," he 
said to himself. 

"Mary Ann, please, sir," the dimples flashed in the pink cheek 
for an instant, and the gray eyes laughed at him. 

"Is there anything I can do for you, sir ?" she hastily got up off 
of her knees and glanced suggestively towards the door. 

"Er-no," he stammered, confusedly. "That is — you're a very 
extraordinary maid, er — Mary Ann." So this was the kind of maid 
they kept in this remarkable boarding house where old Mammies 
of the Southern type examined without compunction the picture of 
a fellow's best girl. Just a maid. Why she was a darned sight more 
interesting than any of the carefully rouged and coiffured young 
ladies who made up the society of the small summer resort. 

"Thank you, sir. Is that all, today?" and this time she looked 
at the door in a very pointed manner. He was forced to take the 
hint. 

"Yes, that's all, thank you." He turned toward the door, in- 
wardly calling himself all kinds of an idiot for letting a mere maid 
in exceedingly becoming blue gingham get the better of him. 

As he stalked disgustedly up the stairs, he was conscious of the 
high voice, provokingly sweet, singing its. carefree lilt, "Come down 
to Kew in lilac-time." He was relieved to shut the sound out by 
loudly slamming his room door. 

"Girls are nuisances," he told himself, as he flung himself down 
at his desk to write to one member of that sex, who smiled sweetly 
at him from among the books and letters. 

"Dear Ellen," he scrawled across the sheet, and was irritated to 
discover that a charming face, framed in a ridiculous towel, smiled 
mockingly up at him from the page. He tore the paper with disgust, 
threw it into the waste basket and reached for his "Kipling." 



The St. Mary's Muse 



A loud knock on the door interrupted him just as he found his 
place, and in response to his invitation, Aunt Tilly, broom in hand, 
appeared in the doorway. 

"Come in, Mammy. Going to clean up ?" Closing his book with 
a snap, Marshal got up from the desk. 

"Law, no, mistah," Aunt Tilly smiled assuringly. "Jes' been 
brushin' up de hall a little, an' thought I'd stick mah head in, an' 
see if'n you didn't want nothin'. Did you hab a good game of tennis, 
suh?" she came further into the room, evidently with intent to be 
sociable. 

"Kotten!" Unpleasant thoughts of the inconsistent Miss Dixon 
caused him to grimace. 

"Now, dat's sho' a shame, but den I knowed that fuzzy-headed 
Dixon gal couldn't play no tennis. Dat game takes somebody wid 
a li'l life in 'em. I knows, mistah, coze I done seen mah young 
mitis play, an' she sho' make de dus' fly on de tennis court. Dey 
ain't no lively young ladies 'round dis heah quare place. Dey all 
'pears to be so tired an' listless like, but down in Winchester, Vir- 
ginia, de ladies all likes to play an' ride horseback. It sho' is hard 
on mah young mistis to hab to gib up dem things, but de Lawd sees 
fit to deal wid his chillun in debious ways," Aunt Tilly shook her 
head mournfully. 

"So your young mistress is here with you. I haven't seen all the 
members of the household, then ?" Marshal's interest was somewhat 
aroused by this description of a tennis-playing, horseback riding- 
young person from Virginia. 

"Law, Mistah Marshal, ain't you seen huh, yet ? We sho' wouldn't 
be runnin' no boardin' house if'n old marse hadn't gone an' died wid 
out leavin' a cent. We ain't de boardin' house kin'," and she tossed 
her head with evident pride in "our" family traditions. 

"But bless yo' heart, dis ain't puttin dinnah on de table," turn- 
ing toward the door, "an' I bettah be movin' on." A flash of white 
teeth, a curtsy of the kinky head and she was gone, leaving Marshal 



The St. Maky's Muse 



to wonder about the remarkable person she had described in such 
glowing terms, her "young mistis." 

The first time Marshal learned that she wasn't really a maid was 
the afternoon when he was returning from the nearby lake with a 
crowd of picnickers, and met her in a small white racer, with a dan- 
gerously good-looking chap in a jersey sweater. She wore something 
blue, and under the bewitching feathers that waved from the brim 
of her hat, her piquant face smiled adorably. Like a flash, the truth 
dawned on Marshal. What a fool he had been : Taking her for an 
ordinary maid and willing to let it go at that, when he might have 
known that she was at the very least, extremely unusual. For the 
past few days he had been carrying on a half-flirtation with her, 
calling himself an idiot for doing it. JSTow he realized that he had 
lost his chance. 

He was still telling himself the different kinds of an idiot he was, 
when he got back to his lodgings after a prolonged farewell to the 
picnickers and plans for the next day. The first sight that met his 
eyes was that of a trim little figure with pink checks and a sunbonnet 
watering the potted plants on the front porch. Lost his chance! 
Why, here it was right before him. Didn't he see her three times a 
day, at least, and couldn't he see her of tener if he tried ? The trouble 
heretofore had been to keep away from her for his own peace of 
mind. Of course he didn't once consider that she ever gave him 
a thought, little knowing that every word that Aunt Tilly let fall 
about the handsome gentleman who had the "front room" and with 
whom she seemed to delight to talk, was listened to with deep 
interest by the apparently preoccupied Mary Ann. 

As Marshal approached the vision in pink gingham, he was debat- 
ing in his mind whether or not to let her know that he had discovered 
her identity, for of course she could be none other than Aunt Tilly's 
beloved "young mistis." 

He had just resolved to let things continue on the same basis, and 
to resume for a time his flirtation with "the maid," when the vision 
turned and smiled at him in a friendly way. So she wasn't going to 
tease, today. He returned the smile and with a careless "hello" 



The St. Mary's Muse 



seated himself on the edge of the porch. He whistled softly under 
his breath, while out of the corner of his eye he watched her moving 
about among the plants. Except for her first smile, she hardly 
seemed to know that he was within a hundred miles. 

Suddenly she put down the watering-can, tied more securely the 
strings of her sunbonnet under a firm but dimpled chin, picked up 
a flower basket and started down the steps. 

Marshal stopped whistling and stood up. 

"Where are you going, my pretty maid ?" he asked lightly. 

"I'm going to get some roses for the dining-room." The "pretty 
maid" moved off without so much as a glance for the eager ques- 
tioner. "And you can't come," she added unkindly. 

"Who says I can't ?" he wanted to know, and with two long strides 
he had overtaken her. 

"This is such a perfect afternoon, Mary Ann," he told her with his 
most convincing smile — as if the birds and flowers and sunshine 
weren't assurance enough. "Too nice to waste hanging around the 
house. Let's go for a stroll down to the lake," forgetting how he had 
hated the lake a little earlier in the day. 

"Please, sir, I have to get supper," Mary Ann began, but he 
interrupted. 

"IsTo, you don't. Aunt Tilly can do it perfectly well. It's just 
five o'clock, and we'll have nearly two hours." John Marshal was 
a good pleader, and the little maid, having had a taste of the old- 
time freedom that morning, with an old-time beau from Virginia, 
knew she had yielded, even when she only smiled, and began clipping 
roses with a ruthless hand. 

"Say you will," he begged, and Mary Ann nodded her consent 
even while her conscience was telling her that maids didn't go to 
walk with interesting and handsome boarders, and that maybe 
mother wouldn't approve. Through the trellis she could see Mrs. 
Bingham in the back garden, gathering tomatoes in a big basket. 
She looked quickly away that her conscience might not get the better 
:>f her. 

"Come on, let's go now," John insisted, and almost before she 
realized what they were about, they were outside the gate and walk- 
ing along the friendly little path that led to the lake. 



10 The St. Mart's Muse 



"Oh, this awful sunbonnet !" she gasped breathlessly. 
"It's a nice sunbonnet/' he objected, and they both laughed. She 
thought that only a companionable sort of person could laugh so 
heartily over a sunbonnet, and he thought how pretty her cheek was 
when she laughed and showed the dimple. 

All the way to the lake they talked and joked as if they were j 
friends of long standing. She was such a easy little person to get 
along with when she didn't feel inclined to tease, and he was very 
good company, as the feminine half of the summer colony had i 
discovered. 

What a wonderful time they had, tramping along the shore of the 
lake and breathing the salty air ! Mary Ann entirely forgot her role 
of maid, and Marshal found himself becoming more and more 
captivated. 

It was nearer eight than seven when the truants returned to a 
worried Mrs. Bingham and a cold supper. Aunt Tilly fussed over 
them in her most motherly manner, fixing a cozy little meal for them, 
and gossiping about the events of the day. 

"Let's, go to the dance over in the pavilion," John suggested when 
the last vestige of salad and sandwiches had disappeared. 

"Oh, no, I can't I've got a lot of sewing to do," Mary Ann's mood 
had changed, and she was beginning to regret her rashness. 

They talked rather intermittently for a while, and then she 
slipped out, on pretext of work to be done. 

It was that night that Marshal turned the smiling young lady's 
picture to the wall, and went to sleep to dream of pink sunbonnets, 
roses and laughing gray eyes. His dreams wouldn't have been so 
sweet had he known that the girl who figured in them was lying 
awake, accusing herself of extreme foolishness, and resolving to 
avoid a certain young man thenceforth. 

"Law, Miss Mary Ann, don' stir it lak that. Jes' don' let it bile 
over. Dare now!" and Aunt Tilly pulled the huge kettle of boiling 
red liquid to the back of the stove. 



The St. Maky's Muse 11 

"It'll sho' turn out fine, honey, so don't git het up over it." 

But Aunt Tilly was wrong. The jelly didn't turn out fine, al- 
though they were hopeful even after it had been poured out in glasses 
and set on the shelf outside, to cool. 

Aunt Tilly started for the kitchen garden, assuring Mary Ann 
that "It'll jell, sho', in a li'l while." 

Mary Ann, flushed and tired, sat disconsolately on the steps and 
waited. Fifteen minutes passed and still it hadn't jellied. After 
assuring herself that it wasn't going to, Mary Ann buried her head 
in her arms and gave way to nervous, uncontrollable sobs. 

She heard steps on the path, and thinking it was Aunt Tilly, 
looked up and exclaimed tearfully, "I — It didn't j-jell!" 

"What didn't jell?" said a masculine voice, and Mary Ann raised 
dismayed eyes to John Marshal's face. 

"F-fudge, of course," she said contemptuously, but the disdainful 
effect was spoiled by the fact that a large tear trickled, in the most 
humiliating way, down the side of her nose. 

"Please, little girl, don't cry," said John consolingly, and he sat 
down beside her on the steps. "Who cares about the old jelly any- 
way ?" and he proceeded to comfort her in a most satisfactory way. 

It was so nice to be comforted that Mary Ann forgot to be dig- 
nified and cried away her grief on a strong, broad, tweed shoulder. 

"Dat's right, Mr. Marshal," said Aunt Tilly, coming up the path 
with her basket of vegetables. "Dey ain't nothin' lak a li'l lovin' 
when things goes wrong. But, dare now, de kitchen steps ain't no 
place for co'tin'. I invise you to go to de rose arbor, where dey 
ain't no grocer boys or nothin' gwine disturb yer." 

Under the rose arbor, on a small, rustic bench, where there was 
just room enough for two, John forgave her for her seeming indif- 
ference, and Mary Ann forgave him for believing that she was a 
maid. 

"Anyway, I knew you were the most wonderful girl in the world, 
maid or no maid," he assured the soft, brown mass of hair against 
his shoulder, and the friendly roses nodded their agreement. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 



Food 

Rainsford Glass, '20 

The term food is, indeed, a very broad one and one which may be 
treated from various standpoints. It embraces many topics which 
may be worked out in different ways ; it gives varied scope for the 
imagination and it is practically limitless in exent. And yet, not- 
withstanding the fact that food is one of the most important factors 
in human life and is, indeed, absolutely necessary to life itself; 
notwithstanding the fact that food has brought about the develop- 
ment of the human race, I wonder how many of us stop to think of 
its great importance. We know that it means a great deal to us in 
our narrow life, but do we stop to think of its manifold results ; of 
its part in the great movements of creations ; of the dependence put 
upon it by all sorts and conditions of men in the past and in the 
present? I am afraid we do not. It is my purpose, therefore, to 
try, in a brief space, to point out some interesting facts about food 
which may not have come to the attention of many, and also if I may, 
to arouse interest in this great question. 

In the first days of the world, Adam and Eve were driven from 
the garden because they yielded to the temptation offered in the 
shape of the apple. So we see that food, indirectly, brought evil into 
the world. Esau, in Biblical History, sold his birthright for a 
mere mess of pottage, another example of bodily temptation. In- 
stancing once more from Scripture, we find that the journey by the 
Israelites into Egypt was necessitated by a failure of the crops in 
Palestine. 

In the pastoral stages of the development of man, practically all 
wars were fought for the possession of pasture land which fed the 
flocks, which in turn served for food of the people. The great mi- 
grations or movements of whole peoples were due to the search for 
better lands. 

Migrations of families, more commonly called emigration, from 
European countries to the United States have been laregly due to the 
food question. For example, the failure of the currant crop in 



The St. Mary's Muse 13 

Greece threw many men out of employment and destroyed their 
means of making a livelihood, and they were forced to seek employ- 
ment elsewhere. Again, the failure of the potato crop in Ireland 
about 1848 sent thousands of starving Irish to the shores of our 
nourishing land. In this connection it is of interest to note that in 
return for having brought the new article, tobacco, into England, Sir 
Walter Raleigh was granted large estates in Ireland. Into these 
estates he brought the American potato, which formed such a valu- 
able food from that time on, that it gained the name "Irish" potato. 
Even our most common articles of food have an interesting history, 
if we did but know it. 

Of all foods, the ones to which we in America are most indebted 
are spices. These apparently trifling, insignificant luxuries we are 
to thank for our existence as a nation. For was it not in the 
search for a nearer route to India and the Eastern spice land, that 
Columbus discovered this continent ? If the Europeans had been 
content to eat their foods without seasoning or variety of taste, who 
knows but that America might today be an unknown continent ? 

If it were not for the food question, wars would be quite different 
propositions from what they now are. For it is lack of food which 
causes the surrender of cities, of defenses, and indeed of whole 
armies of thousands of men. Even after holding out impossible 
lengths of time, no human beings can last forever without food, and 
must eventually, surrender. The chief question in military tactics, 
over which many hours of labor and thought are spent, centers around 
the most expedient way of cutting off the food supply of the enemy, 
and so causing his downfall. Not only in the field is the food ques- 
tion felt. For can anyone forget the wheatless, sweetless, meatless, 
and, as we were apt jokingly to say, eatless days of the war ? 

The lack of food in the winter months of the year has given birth 
to several industries which have become most useful to us in our 
everyday life, canning and the beet sugar industry. The discovery 
that sugar can be obtained from beets has surely been a God-send — 
especially to those countries which in time of war cannot obtain 
sugar from the cane growing districts. And what has been more 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 



practically useful than the canning industry which enables us to 
live through the non-productive seasons of the year in comparative 
comfort ? Indeed, how conld we have kept such huge armies in the 
field during the past war if it had not been for the canned goods? 
This is too evident to admit of doubt. 

To take up another phase of this same question. Food, or the 
transportation of food, is at the root of all commerce. The need of 
our nation for food not raised within its own boundaries has given 
rise to this method of exchange, which has formed the basis for 
the code of international law which forms our platform with regard 
to neighboring nations. 

Food has brought about many industrial improvements. Famines 
have occurred in certain sections of a country while other sections 
have been flourishing for the simple reason that there is no adequate 
means of transportation. In India, especially, the railroads have 
been built to carry food from one part of the country to another. In 
our own western plains the great work of reclaiming the desert was 
started with the view to making a greater amount of soil produc- 
tive. Examples along this line could be given ad infinitum. 

I wonder how many of us when we sit down to a meal give any 
thought at all to the great and manifold forces at play in the prepa- 
ration of the food that is set before us? We are prone to take 
these products as a matter of course, without wondering where they 
come from, or thinking of the varied experiences of each thing from 
its production to its final resting place before us on the table. Let 
us, for a few minutes consider an ordinary dinner. The majority 
of the dishes are probably home grown, but even their history is 
interesting. Take, for example, the meat. Does it not bring to mind 
the great stretches of our western prairies, dotted with thousands of 
peacefully grazing cattle ? And then the rice calls to mind the warm, 
wet rice fields of our southern Seaboard and Gulf port states. The 
vegetables are probably raised in the near neighborhood, but we 
make a great skip of conditions and continents in considering the 
pepper, which is raised in the hot climates and is prepared by brown 
skinned natives who are far different from our own people. The 



The St. Mart's Muse 15 



salt recalls still another great industry of our country while the 
coffee again takes us, in imagination, to our brown skinned benefac- 
tors. The sugar brings to mind either our southern states or the 
neighboring islands off the coast of Florida. 

And now to come from the broader survey of this great question 
to a more narrow view of its importance to us here at St. Mary's. 
The one word "food" sums up the chief thoughts of girls away at 
school ; it makes the heart beat faster and the "mouth water," as the 
darkeys, say. The "meal" bells call us to a brief respite from our 
numerous tasks and serve to satisfy our apparently insatiable appe- 
tites. Perhaps, if the food is not to our liking we may engage in 
enlightening conversation. 

Once again, the chief question asked of one who is fortunate 
enough to have been at a party is always, invariably "What did you 
have to eat ?" Indeed, anything to eat, constitutes a party, whether it 
be a cake or a whole box of "eats." The general meaning of a "busy" 
sign is that food is in the process of being devoured. 

One of the most distressing of rules is the one forbidding the 
longed-for boxes from home. We must needs sit by and see our good 
homemade food sent away. Life is indeed hard. 

On Mondays, the most popular places of all are the tea-room and 
drug stores. Odds and ends can wait but we must get food first and 
foremost. This in ordinary times. But what of extraordinary times 
such as quarantine days ? The words "Little Store" have been 
indelibly engraved on our minds, for without it we would have been 
in a sad state. True, we had basket ball games and debates — food 
for excitement and thought — but this intangible diet furnishes only 
temporary relief. 

Is it not the "customary" thing for a girl to send her crush food 
in some shape — candy or fruit — as a sign of her devotion % It is the 
first real sign that one has that she has a crush. One might infer 
that, as the way to a man's heart is through food, a crush's heart 
might be reached along this same highway. In this connection it 
might be mentioned that the only substitute for food is a crush. For 
they say that in critical cases, appetites have been lost — for a while 
at least. 



16 The St. Mary's Muse 



By the aforesaid examples, we see what a vastly important part 
food has had to do with our life in the past. It is natural to think 
that the same question will be one of concern in the future. Even 
now, we are face to face with a serious problem. We have been 
selling food to Europe with no guarantee for payment. Europe 
cannot pay the debt incurred by the war, or even the interest on it, 
and therefore it cannot be expected that she can pay for foodstuffs. 
Are we to give food away ? Or, if not, what will happen ? There 
will be a surplus amount of food in this country; men will be 
thrown out of employment and prices should come down — but this 
will cause the parallel labor questions and there will be general 
economic unrest, of which the outcome is, as yet, a mystery. These 
are mere possibilities — not certainties. 

So it is, that throughout all the ages, from the beginning of time 
to the present day, food has been one of the chief factors in the 
development of civilization and of the human race, and will con- 
tinue to be so in the future. The question is one of vital importance 
and, as I hope I have shown, one of keen interest. 



The St. Maky's Muse 



17 




Infirmary Blues 

Crichton Thorne 

When you are feeling awful blue and the ward ain't big enough 

To hold your thoughts and the small white beds, and they fill 

you up with stuff; 

When your neighbor coughs until she's hoarse, and you blow 

and groan and bark, 
When your cover feels all prickly and outside it's growing dark; 

When home is miles and miles away and the distance gives you pain, 
When you feel like Sarah with your lunch will never come again; 

Then cheer up, Honey, 'cause you know, it's worse than all your 

"Flues" 
Just to lie there kinder listless like and have Infirmary Blues. 

But this life ain't all of darkness and your cares don't ^ 

seem so near ~~ ^^/* "~ 

When Miss Alex tucks your covers in with a "Feeling (fjL >>\ 
better dear?" 

A pity every School we know can't have the luck to fitf^ *jfl 

choose 'vs&i^^ 

An angel knowing how to cure colds and Infirmary 
Blues. 



18 The St. Maky's Muse 



A Roroance of t^e Sea 

Lucy London Anderson, '20 

In the year of our Lord seventeen hundred and forty, there spreads 
through the village on the Isle of Jersey the astonishing news that 
a ship is in sight, and that it is headed directly for the harbor of the 
Isle. As this unusual report reaches the people, they eagerly and 
anxiously hasten to the shore to welcome the ship in port. Not far 
off, on the hill, the chimes of the little chapel peal forth the joyful 
tidings of the arrival of the long expected ship. Immediately the 
doors of the chapel are opened, and men, women, and children rush 
out, after the Easter Service, to join their friends on the shore. 

Mingled with this crowd of spectators are many French Hugue- 
nots, who a few years before had fled from the cruel tortures and 
persecutions of the French king, and sought peace and shelter on 
the Isle of Jersey. The inhabitants of the Isle had received these 
Huguenots with open hospitality and kindness, protecting them for 
many, many months until a ship should come to take them to the 
JSTew World. Time after time their hopes had been aroused over the 
sight of a sail, but only to be dashed to pieces when the sail did not 
turn into the little harbor. 

So, now, as this good ship Baliol glides into port, 'tis no wonder 
that crie3 of joy and excitement greet her from the awaiting crowd. 
The anchor is cast — the captain and sailors hasten ashore. It is 
soon learned that the ship can remain only a short time, and that 
all who expect to leave, must be on board in three hours. 'Tis even 
rumored that a very important personage is on the ship, which neces- 
sitates the short stay. Some whisper that is is an ambassador of the 
King. 

Everyone runs here and there collecting their necessary equip- 
ments for departure. At last the crowd once more assembles on the 
shore ; but this time there is a tinge of sadness intermingled with the 
previous cries of joy. For 'tis true that these Huguenots must bid 
farewell to their kind and beneficent hosts of the Isle, and leave for 
a new land — perhaps never to return. The ship's bell sounds — 



The St. Mary's Muse 19 

friends call out to each other — handkerchiefs wave a last good bye — 
and the little ship with its full cargo of brave Huguenots sails out of 
the harbor. Thus it is that on this clear and beautiful Easter, a little 
ship starts forth on its dangerous passage across the Atlantic, bear- 
ing a people who have been oppressed, and who turn their eyes and 
hopes to America in order to achieve their ideals of peace and 
happiness. 

Another bright and beautiful day dawns upon the voyagers, but 
this time they are in mid Atlantic. All seems quiet on board. The 
"important personage" has been sick, but is reported better. On the 
upper deck, the figure of a tall man may be seen pacing to and fro. 
'Tis a tall and manly figure indeed, enveloped in a flowing military 
cape. The sea breeze is blowing his wavy black hair, but even this 
does not disturb his deep meditation. He rounds a corner — and 
stops short. A slight noise attracts his attention, and he turns his 
eyes to behold the sleeping form of a young girl, who is entirely 
unconscious of the neglected book, her wind tossed curls, or the 
purring of her pet cat at her side. Rather she seems lost in a land 
of dreams and romance. The man gazes so intently at this picture, 
that suddenly the long lashes move, the large blue eyes open, and the 
lovely lips murmur : a Mon chevalier !" 

"Oh, pardon me, my little one, have I disturbed your sleep V he 
hastens to say. At last the girl becomes conscious of her surround- 
ings, and likewise embarrassed. 

"No indeed," she says with a slight accent, "I was reading my 
fairy stories, and just fell asleep. I was dreaming about a wonder- 
ful cavalier, who saved me from an awful beast. I called him my 
"chevalier." Then I woke up and saw you. My name is Anne 
Manger. My father is Henri Manger, Governor of the party. But 
I don't know you, Monsieur, how is it I haven't seen you before ?" 

"~No, my little Huguenot maid, you don't know me, nor can I tell 
you my name at present. But may I pray you call me by that name 
you did a moment ago, when you first awoke; and besides let me sit 
here by you while you tell me more of your fairy dream, and your 
other "chevalier." 



20 The St. Maey's Muse 

Thus, it happens, that fate places the handsome Englishman and 
the French maiden together. As the days pass into weeks these two 
become more and more intimate. Many are the happy hours they 
spend together on deck (whenever the mysterious stranger can suc- 
cessfully elude the other voyagers). Watching the blue waters, they 
discuss each others' dreams, hopes, and aspirations for the new life. 
Gradually those worried looks on the stranger's face become less 
frequent, and his countenance assumes the look of determination and 
perseverance. To him, though somewhat of a child, Anne becomes 
a sort of angel, who trusts and inspires him: and to Anne, he soon 
takes the place of the dream cavalier, and becomes in reality her 
knight, her "chevalier," as she always calls him. 

As the ship nears the coast of the Carolinas, the season for storms 
approaches. The weather becomes less favorable, and finally one 
night there is a terrible storm. The little ship tossed about by the 
huge waves, strikes a reef. The crash awakens everyone. In- 
stantly there is a clamoring on deck, and the small boats are lowered. 
Women and children go first, of course, and when there is room the 
men follow. In the rush and excitement Anne loses sight of the 
stranger, who, after helping the last of the women, suddenly dashes 
back to his cabin for some valuable papers. Another crash comes, 
and the little boats are separated. 

All night and all day the boat in which Anne and her father 
are, drifts about, and on the second day is picked up by a fishing 
boat. After several weary weeks of travel, the Mangers at last 
arrive in Charleston, where they find many of their Huguenot 
friends and relatives have preceded them, and who hospitably wel- 
come them into their midst. 

Once more an Easter Morn dawns on these Huguenots, but now 
ten years have elapsed since that joyously eventful Easter when 
they set sail from the Isle of Jersey. These years have proved 
very prosperous, since they brought the fulfilment of the Huguenots 
search for peace and religious freedom. Many of the families have 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 

prospered in commercial ways, and become important factors in 
the social and political life of the Carolinas. Henri Manger is now 
one of the acknowledged leaders in political matters and lives on his 
estate, just outside of Charleston, with his daughter Anne. On this 
particular Easter day, when the last words of the anthems have been 
sung, a crowd of gayly dressed young people pour forth from the 
open doors of St. Paul's. Among the number of new bonneted girls, 
stands one, who evidently seems to be the center of the admiring 
crowd. 'Tis true she has on a new bonnet covered with flowers, and 
also a new silk dress, both just lately arrived from the shops in Lon- 
don. She looks unusually pretty in her new attire, and as person 
after person stops to chat with her, and perhaps pass a few delicate 
compliments, she nods and smiles at them, and a stray golden curl 
escapes from beneath her bonnet strings. 

All these young people seem very much excited as they gossip 
together, and such stray sentences as these may be heard. 

"Oh, dear, what shall I wear ?" "I wonder will he be very hand- 
some." "Surely he will not disappoint us." "Oh, won't Anne be 
a lovely Queen, just look !" 

From all this we have an idea that some great event draws near, 
and we are right too, because surely they are discussing the great 
annual Festival, which is held every Easter Monday in Charleston. 

At length the "center of the attraction" of this crowd starts toward 
her carriage. Immediately several gallant gentlemen step forward 
to assist her in. She thanks them all very gracefully, calls to her 
coachman, and drives away. 

Down the palm shaded avenue she goes, until passing a similar 
coach, in which a very stately lady and gentleman are seated, she 
stops. 

"Good morrow, Mistress Anne, and how fares, our lovely Queen 
of tomorrow's Festival," the Governor of the colony calls out. 

"Why, how are you today Governor, and Mrs. Calvert ?" Anne 
answers. 

"Anne, I've some very startling news for you indeed. ISTow, 
hush," begins Mrs. Calvert, "and don't run because I intend to tell 
you about a man. Only this morning the post from Wilmington 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 



brought me word that the noted Sir John Pendleton was to arrive 
here in time for tomorrow's celebration. Cousin William DeRosset 
writes that Sir John is very charming, very handsome, sure to please 
even the most fastidious dancing partner, besides being the most 
accomplished and brilliant lawyer of North Carolina. 'Tis whis- 
pered, too, that he is highly trusted and esteemed by the King. So, 
my dear Anne, prepare to look your prettiest, for Sir John will be 
the Queen's partner for the minuet." 

In the crowded ball room of the Governor's Mansion, the trum- 
pet blows as a signal for the formation of the minuet. Amidst 
raining confetti and gayly colored ribbons the partners are sought 
out. A pause — the Queen of the Festival ascends her dias — is 
crowned with a garland of flowers. Sir John steps forward to claim 
her as his partner, bows low over her hand, — she curtsies, — and 
looks up, — two pairs of familiar blue and brown eyes instantly meet. 

"My Chevalier," she murmurs. 

The minuet is over, the Festival is ended, the couples begin to de- 
part. Yet, under a Southern sky, in an old, old Southern garden, 
a couple walk, arm in arm. 

a My Chevalier, why did I never know your name? Why did I 
never hear from you ?" asks the girl. 

"My little one," he answers, "then, when I was coming to Amer- 
ica, I was not my own master. I served some one higher. I served 
his Majesty, the King. As a secret messenger, I bore important 
documents, from him to the Governor of North Carolina. It was 
those documents I sought to save the night of the wreck. I was on 
my honor to deliver them and not until then reveal my identity. On 
the ship I was, therefore, forced to live apart from the others, and 
feign sickness. Those stolen hours I spent with you, my little Anne, 
were the most wonderful of my life. It was you who inspired me 
to do as I have, and now that my mission is fulfilled, I ask you to 
share with me those same honors and successes you inspired." 

Thus, this does not end, but only begins a romance of the sea. 



The St. Mary's Muse 23 



An Uncomfortable Hour 

Rainsford Glass, '20 

Characters 
Mrs. Black ) - 

Mrs. White j 

Susie Laycock, Mary Ann's younger sister 
Mr. Laycock, Mary Ann's father 
Jimmy Brandon, Mary Ann's fiance 
Mary Ann Laycock, the heroine 
Scene — Living room of the Laycock second floor apartment Susie 
is standing looking out of open window in rear. Mary Ann is stand- 
ing at center table strapping an overcrowded suitcase. 

Mary Ann. I simply can't get this strapped. (Turning to win- 
dow). Come here quick, Susie, and hold this end down. 

Susie. I told you not to try to put so much in. I can send the 
other things in a box. 

Mary Ann. Now if I can just get safely out before Daddy comes 

in. 

Susie. He's going to work late tonight. You'll have plenty of 
time. (Taking suitcase from table and sitting on it) . There, that's 
done at last ! 

Mary Ann. Oh, goodness, where did I put my coat ? (Rushing 
to sofa) Here it is. Kow where's my hat? 

Susie (hurrying out of room, unseen by Mary Ann). I'll get 
it. Wait a minute. 

Mary Ann. I may be doing wrong, but I've told Daddy if he 
wouldn't consent to my marrying Jimmy I'd do it anyway, and now 
I've waited long enough. He said he'd be here at eight-thirty sharp, 
and leave the car around the corner. (Looks at watch). Goodness ! 
It's already eight-twenty. Susie! Oh, I thought — 

Susie (rushing in with hat). Here it is, Mary Ann. (Stops and 
listens intently). Oh ! (with relief) I thought I heard the door bell. 

Mary Ann. The bell? (Looks up quickly). That's just the 
trouble with this old apartment — there's no possible way to sneak 
out the back door. I wish to goodness they'd hurry and finish our 
house. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 

Susie (scornfully) . Much good it will do Mrs. Jimmy Brandon. 

Mary Ann (with a smile). That's so too. Well, I'll visit you 
all in the new house. (Picking up suitcase). Here, Susie, put this 
with my hat and coat over by the window. (Seeing look of surprise 
on Susie's face). No, you goose, I'm not going to jump out — merely 
lower them to Jimmy. (Stopping short). There's his car now! 
Come here quick and help me. 

Susie (tying rope around suitcase, coat and hat). Now it's all 
ready. (Looking out of window) There's Jimmy now, under the 
tree! (Whistles to Jimmy) Let it down easy! (They both let the 
bundle down slowly and carefully ; then both draw a sigh of relief. 
Bell rings). 

Mary Ann (listening intently). It can't be Jimmy. What 
shall I do? 

Susie. Be calm, my dear Sis, be calm. It may be merely a mes- 
senger. (Goes to door and opens it). Why, how do you do, Mrs. 
White! What do you — I mean (confusedly) won't you sit down? 
Mother's not here, but if there's anything we can do for you — 

Mrs. White (surprised). Oh! Your mother hasn't come home 
yet? Well, I heard some little news today I thought she might be 
interested in, and I had an idea she was expected this afternoon. 
(Sits down as if to pay a visit). 

Mary Ann (to Susie). Oh, that woman is here for good! I 
feel it in my bones. (Turning to Mrs. White) I'm sure she would 
like to hear it, but she's not coming home for a week yet. (Looks 
at window). 

Mrs. White (with surprised look). What's the matter? (See- 
ing Susie evidently motioning to somebody from window, aside). 
What a rude child! (To Mary Ann) How sweet your little sister is 
getting to be, isn't she? Well, as I was saying — 

Susie (returning from window). Father won't be home till late, 
Mrs. White. Can we do anything for you? 

Mrs. White (raising left eyebrow significantly). Oh, no, thank 
you: I merely wanted to tell your mother about — er — that is, as 
she isn't here, I'll go on over to Mrs. Black's and tell her about it. 
(Exit). 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 

Susie. Isn't she the limit, Mary Ann ? Nothing but a town gos- 
sip. I'm glad Mother wasn't here ; she'd have been bored to death. 

Mary Ann. Thank goodness she's gone. Susie, run to the win- 
dow and motion Jimmy that I'm on my way. (Susie goes to ivindoiv 
and, looking out, nods head affirmatively ; then turns to Mary Ann.) 

Susie. You'd better hurry, before somebody else happens along. 

Mary Ann. Well, I'm ready now. Good-bye, Susie dear. 
(Kisses her hurriedly). You've been an angel to help me out as 
you've done. I'll be back in a few days. (Takes note out of table 
drawer). Give this to Daddy. I hope he won't take it out on you. 
(Walks quickly toivards door). 

Susie (Brushing away a tear and blinking hard). Don't worry 
about me — only please don't stay too long at first ! 

Mary Ann (Opens door while looking back and thereby nearly 
overturns a lady about to knock). Why — er — please excuse me, 
Mrs. Black. I was in a big hurry. Mother's not at home, you know. 

Mrs. Black. She hasn't returned ? (Making no move to get out 
of Mary Anns way). Well, my dear, I will tell you about it — and 
it may interest you too. Come! (Pulls Mary Ann into the room 
with her. Mary Ann looks despairingly at Susie.) You poor dears, 
how you must miss your mother. Who does the housekeeping ? 

Mary Ann. Both of us. 

Mrs. Black. Well, well, now isn't that fine? You know it's 
really an excellent experience for a girl. Is your cook doing all 
right ? 

Mary Ann. Yes. 

Mrs. Black (undaunted). It's a good thing you two have each 
other for company. What do you do all day ? 

Susie. Oh, everything, and when night comes we're always ready 
for bed early. (Yawning) . 

Mrs. Black. You poor children! ISTo wonder. By the way, 
where is your father % Are you two here alone ? That's a real down- 
right shame. 

Susie. Oh, no, we really like it. (Whistle sounds again. Mary 
Ann and Susie start guiltily). 



26 The St. Mary's Muse 

Mrs. Black {comfortably). That's nothing — only a messenger 
boy outside. 

Mary Ann. I guess I'm — er — a— a little bit nervous. {Tele- 
phone rings and Susie runs to answer it). 

Susie. Hello ! Yes, this is Mrs. Laycock's number. JSJo, this is 
Susie. Yes, she's been here about five minutes. Can I give her 
a message ? Oh, certainly — wait a minute. {Puts receiver down 
and calls Mrs. Black to phone) It's for you, Mrs. Black! 

Mrs. Black. Thank you. {Rises and goes to phone). Hello — 
yes — why, I'll be right over, Mrs. White. Just wait till I get there. 
Yes. Oh, you were ? How did I miss seeing you ? Well, good-bye. 

Mary Ann {whispers to Susie). Thank goodness she's going! 

Mrs. Black. Well, I'll be over in the morning to tell you the 
story. Mrs. White says she has some exceedingly important news 
to tell me and hasn't long to say. That's the reason I must rush 
along now. Goodnight, my dears. {Exit). 

Mary Ann. Just let her get out of sight and I'll make one more 
attempt. If that fails I guess I'll have to give up my plans. {Flops 
drearily down on chair near door. Whistle outside). 

Susie. Poor Jimmy — I guess he's about as nervous as you are. 
{Goes to window and looks out). 

Mary Ann {sighing deeply). Here goes my final plunge. 
{Exit.) 

Susie. Well ! {Sinks down in arm chair by the table and silence 
reigns, broken only by the ticking of the clock. Soon the door re- 
opens to admit Mary Ann and her father). For goodness' sake, 
what's happened now? 

Mary Ann. Daddy said I couldn't go to Julia's by myself at 
night. He met me on the steps, and he said he wanted to talk to me 
anyway. {Drops in chair). 

Mr. Laycock. Yes, I don't at all approve of young girls going 
out alone at night — too many toughs around. Susie, get me some 
tea, will you please? I'm absolutely played out. {Exit Susie). 

Mary Ann. I'm awfully ner — I mean, sleepy tonight. I — er — 
don't know what's the matter. Guess I've done too much tonight — 
I mean today. 



The St. Mary's Muse 27 

Mb. Laycock. Better go to bed early. What have you been 
doing tonight ? 

Mary Ann. Jim — I mean, Mrs. Black and Mrs. White both 
called — I thought they'd never leave. Mrs. White, as usual, had 
heard some news she wanted to tell Mother. 

Mr. Laycock. Blessing she hadn't come back. {Lights cigar 
and puffs in silence for a few seconds. Mary Ann picks up book and 
is very fidgety). Mary Ann, there's something on my mind I must 
tell you. (Coughs and clears throat in evident embarrassment). 

Mary Ann. Well, I'm listening. 

Mr. Laycock. Guess you know what I'm talking about — Jimmy 
Brandon. I've been watching him pretty closely. He's got more in 
him than I thought — got nerve and brains and perseverance. 

Mary Ann. I told you — 

Mr. Laycock. Yes, of course you did — who wouldn't have said 
so under the circumstances ? As I was saying, I've been watching 
him — business doing well — prospects look bright. Altogether, more 
desirable addition to the family than I thought at first — 

Mary Ann. Oh, I'm so glad you — 

Mr. Laycock. Don't interrupt. So after careful consideration 
of all matters concerned I've decided — 

Mary Ann. Oh, Daddy, have you really % (Jumps up to sit on 
arm of her father's chair). 

Mr. Laycock. Don't be too hasty. I've decided to let you marry 
him — eventually. But you must wait at least three months to be 
good and sure. I want no mistakes made in this matter — too serious. 
(Enter Susie with the tea). 

Mary Ann. Oh, Susie, Daddy has at last given in! (Susie 
almost overturns tray as she set's it down on table). 

Susie. Let me call Jimmy right now: (Runs to window and 
calls loudly). 

Mary Ann (blushing furiously and shamefacedly looking down). 
Daddy, I've a confession to make. I was just on the verge of run- 
ning away tonight. Thank goodness I met you first. I'd lots rather 
do it the other way — but we just couldn't wait. 






28 The St. Mary's Muse 



Me. Laycock (Looks up and frowns, remains silent a moment, 
then sighs). Well, the young are often wild. (ReYectively) I was 
in my day. 

Enter Jimmy, almost on the run. Susie rushes up and grabs his 
arm. 

Susie. Isn't it grand. Jimmy? Daddy says you and Mary 
Ann can get married and won't have to elope, and I can be in the 
wedding, and — 

Jimmy. Susie— Mary Ann— Mr. Laycock, what in the world 
does this mean? I thought sure somebody had been killed from 
Susie's wild calling. (Looks from one to another, puzzled). 

Me. Laycock. It means, Jimmy, that I have consented to your 
marriage with my daughter. 

Jimmy. Well, sir, I feel really guilty. Has Mary Ann told 

you? 

Maey Ann. Yes, of course, and he didn't seem a bit mad ! 

Me. Laycock. No, it's no use. Love will find a way, I suppose, 
and I'm only too glad I came along in time to stop this elopement. 
Now I am certain of having my little girl with me at least three 
months— can't I say that, Mary Ann? (appealingly) . 

Maey Ann. You surely can. Oh, I'm so happy— but I've cer- 
tainly been through an uncomfortable hour! (Crosses to Jimmy, 
and he takes her hand). 

Susie. And I can put up my hair and wear high heels and be 
Miss Laycock— goody ! (She parades back and forth across room 
with head held high and hums) "Here comes the bride !" 

Curtain. 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 



Fire Dril 



Mary Hoke, '20 



Lunch is over on this cold Saturday afternoon — always on Satur- 
day — and the girls stroll leisurely out of the dining room, some to 
a "meeting of St. Catherine's Chapter," others to report, and the 
luckier ones to take their "three times 'round the grove" — Sud- 
denly : What ! recess over already ! It can't be, and yet the hell 
is ringing with an even more determined clang than usual. Every 
one gazes at every one else. Still that bell continues. A sudden 
inspiration communicates itself swiftly from one to another. Fire 
Drill! The girls in the grove fly to their respective places, down 
the front path or the side ones as the case may be; and simultan- 
eously doors on all sides are flung open, and girls pour out pell mell 
down the steps, creating pandemonium as they fly. Miss Bierce, at 
her station at the head of the grove, watches in vain for order to 
come out of chaos. Wild cries are heard, as "Are you twelve ? Then 
I'm thirteen; I'm next to you, or am I eleven? I just can't remem- 
ber from one time to the next !" 

At last an approximate line is formed, the columns straight except 
for a frequent shiver which runs through the whole line when a par- 
ticularly cold blast passes. The teacher or monitor of each section 
calls, "Count off !" and "One, two, three" is heard from each line. 
Why what has happened to that line at the head of the right path ! 
The yelling and shrieking and jumping around surpasses all the rest. 
Is that Senior Hall ? Impossible ! But so it is. The Seniors find- 
ing Miss Lee missing cannot wait for the absence to be reported but 
send the distracted Senior Hall courier in search of her. She sends 
the message back that she is already burned up so they may proceed 
as usual without her. These distressing tidings only increase the 
confusion. 

The drill, however, continues, and the East Rock courier from 
down the line comes up and the reports go to Miss Bierce. "Mildred 
Cooley missing ? In the Infirmary ? All right, but where's Marga- 
ret Kawlings ? Somebody must go for her. She's in the burning 



30 The St. Maby's Muse 

building!" The bravest courier is despatched to the rescue, and 
presently returns supporting the panting miscreant, buttoning on 
a sweater and showing other signs of hurried exit. 

The buildings emptied, Miss Bierce's attention is again attracted 
to that "bedlam" to the right. She can stand it no longer, so leaves 
her post and descends the hill. The Seniors struggle to come to 
attention, but all in vain. (Is that a snicker heard down there at the 
end ? Surely not when all the while some one may be in the flames.) 
Miss Bierce reaches the line and "Girls, this is discouraging to say 
the least ! Not one word more until you reach your rooms." The 
Seniors hang their heads. 

Comparative quiet reigns through the lines at last, probably be- 
cause everyone has become too frozen for words. A second bell is 
rung. Up the path, Indian file, and in step, come the three silent 
processions. The bell is rung again, this time for classes, and the 
excitement is over. 



Chapel Line 

Florida Kent, '22 

St. Mary's is, as we all know, a Church school; and it certainly 
lives up to its reputation. It has its own chapel where services are 
held twice every day — and woe to her who fails to attend one of 
these services. 

Promptly at eight-forty-five the chapel line leaves Assembly to 
make its supposedly quiet way to chapel. First comes the choir, 
a group of about forty girls, arranged according to voice, not height. 
Immediately behind the choir is the student body with the general 
appearance of "the animals come in two by two," beginning with the 
shortest girl in school and ending with the tallest. Then there comes 
a break in the human stairway; for following meekly behind the 
tallest girl in school comes the shortest senior and then upward. 

In order to add to the idea of uniformity, each girl is crowned 
with a chapel cap. The few originals are round, are made of black 
serge, and are placed directly on the center of the head, and give 
the appearance of monkeys to the unfortunates forced to don them. 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



The majority, however, concocted at the last minute, range from a hat 
lining to a middy tie and are adjusted at various angles according to 
the personal taste of the wearer. 

The appearance of the line is influenced greatly by the weather con- 
ditions. In cold weather, as at present, each girl is equipped with 
spats or high shoes, wraps, and heavy dark skirts. As yet we have 
had no experience with warm weather and the future holds many 
changes. 

When the threshold of the chapel is reached the facial expression 
of each girl becomes one of conscious piety. Every eye looks di- 
rectly in front as if afraid that it might swerve from the straight and 
narrow path. There is not a smile to one side or the other. Simul- 
taneously a general removal of hands, from sweater pockets takes 
place, accompanied by an awkward effect of not knowing just what 
to do with arms, etc. With an effort, but a poor one, to keep step, 
the chapel line moves on. 

Taking up the other division of order, occasionally there is quiet. 
The order within chapel depends largely upon psychological influ- 
ences — for instance whether or not the music be sadly religious or 
rather "jazzy," or whether the day be Ash Wednesday or the nine- 
teenth of December. The quietness is interrupted occasionally by 
the sallies of the setter pup who trips lightly into chapel, seemingly 
for the express purpose of affording amusement and of gaining a free 
ride out at the expense of Miss Dennis or one of the youthful owners 
of the dog. 

After a lapse of some fifteen minutes, the doors are opened and 
the line emerges. There is a general gasp for the grateful fresh air 
and a sudden reaching for chapel caps. Hands drop automatically as 
the words come up before the mind, "Do not take off your chapel 
caps until you have reached Assembly." 

Suppressed whispers spreading the latest news ; girls walking 
three abreast with arms entwined ; louder talking as soon as the line 
is safely past the covered way ; stumbling over the door mat ; chanted 
singing of the last hymn, and a fruitless attempt to keep the line 
straight, bring the chapel line at last to the Study Hall, where at one 
tap of the bell, the student body disperses and goes its several ways. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price , .- , Two Dollars 

Single Copies Twenty-five Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1919-20 
Mary T. Yellott, '20, Editor-in-CMef 
Catharine Miller, '20 Catharine Boyd, '20 

Crichton Thorne, '23 Mabel Norfleet, '23 

Frances Venable, '22 Louise Powell, '22 

Jane Ruffin, '20, Business Manager 
Ernest Cruikshank, Faculty Director 



EDITORIAL 

"Spring is coming!" The age-old chant is being sung anew. The 
birds sing it, first of all, of course, and the little green things peep- 
ing boldly up proclaim the fact with a questioning air, as if ready 
to dive back into their warm brown beds if they find a chilly welcome 
awaiting them. The First Breath o' Spring has triumphed at last 
over its many disheartening setbacks, and after one final glory of 
blossom, the little white flowers have given place to the lazier leaves. 
The Grove has caught the prevailing epidemic of Spring Fever and 
is proudly attiring herself in her new green dress, trimmed with 
pink rosebuds and fairy lace of dewy cobwebs. The old Kocks have 
begun to take on a more festive air, and before long the wistaria will 
be out in all its tempting sweetness. Even the little gray squirrels 
feel the change, and as they chase each other up and down the 
trees, within which new life is beginning to stir, and across the 
young, green grass, the very flirt of their pert little tails betrays the 



The St. Mary's Muse 33 



fact that they know the long winter is over and that Spring is at 
least on its way. 

Surely, the world must have begun in the Spring. It is the most 
beautiful season of the year, when everything is just waking from 
the long sleep and Nature's face is nightly washed in dew, to be 
dried in the morning by the caressing warmth of the early sun. The 
blue sky is never bluer than after an April shower when the sudden 
clouds are as suddenly cleared away and the sun smiles down again 
on a smiling earth. 

But the Spring is more than the season of beauty ; it is the season 
of hope. It is the beginning of all things, the end of nothing. So 
it should be an inspiration to us to renew our lagging energy and 
instead of making these last two months a long-drawn anticlimax, to 
make them the very best of all. 



By the way, are you coming back next year % It is a question that 
you don't hear as much yp-t as you will later, but you can't begin 
thinking about it too soon. ("Kooms are assigned strictly in order 
of application!") Some of you know you are coming back; some 
know you are not; some can if they want to, but haven't quite de- 
cided. "Ask a Senior !" You will hardly find one who won't tell 
you, "I'd give my head for your chance to come back." Oh, it's all 
very well to talk about not liking this and that, but when it comes 
right down to it, next September you'll be wishing you were back, 
spats, chapel caps and all ! 



34 The St. Maby's Muse 



SCHOOL NEWS 



February 28 — Sigma First Team Triumphs Again 

The Mu and Sigma First Teams met for their third conflict Sat- 
urday, February 28th. For the first time this season, however, all 
members of both teams were on the floor and from start to finish the 
game was a close one. The teams were in splendid condition and did 
some of the prettiest playing ever seen at St. Mary's. During almost 
the entire first half the ball was kept whizzing from one end of the 
court to the other without a single basket. All four guards were at 
their best, Jane Ruffin and ISTina Cooper having apparently deter- 
mined that their forwards should not have a chance at the goal. 

Early in the second half the score stood six to six. Laura Under- 
wood had made three exceptionally pretty shots and between them, 
the Mu forwards had brought the score to a tie. For several tense 
minutes the game went on, fast and furious, while the second hand 
of the timekeeper's watch flew round and round. At the crucial 
moment almost as Patty had taken breath to blow her whistle, came 
the protest, "Time out," and for five more endless minutes the tie re- 
mained a tie. Then the ball was put in play again, with half a min- 
ute left to go. Down to the Sigma end it went and straight into 
the waiting, confident hands of Laura Underwood. While the bas- 
ket still circled the ball, the final whistle sounded and the score- 
keeper's "Eight to six in favor of the Sigmas" was drowned in the 
Mus "fifteen rahs" for their opponents. 

Following is the line-up for the game : 

Sigma Mu 

Toy ) r Kent 

_ , l Centers ) 

Boyd f i Barber 

Hoke \ ( McCabe 

Underwood J Forwards j Yellott 

Cooper (Capt.) ) ( Ruffin 

Everett J Guards j Glagg (Capt } 

C. M. M. 



The St. Mary's Muse 35 

March 1 — The Faculty Game 

A very unusual entertainment was given in the Gym, Monday 
evening, March 1st. It was nothing less than a thrilling Basket Ball 
game between the "Blacks and Blues" more familiarly known as 
the Faculty. Just before the hour set for the game, forty Mus and 
forty Sigmas, baby-blue beribboned, marched down the steps singing 
"Blue Team's Gonna Shine Tonight." Almost immediately forty 
Sigmas and forty Mus came in the side door, keeping time to "Your 
Pep." They were not chief mourners as their get-ups might have 
led one to believe, but were the staunch upholders of the Blacks. 
Ear splitting cheers were given on both sides as the rival teams 
tripped out upon the battle ground. Lo, a miracle had been wrought ! 
Gone were the dignified teachers who are at times, rather awesome in 
everyday life, and in their places were twelve jolly athletics, clad in 
bloomers and middies. 

Each team stood under its goal and cheered its opponents. The 
game was called by Nina Cooper who, in stentorian tones, shouted 
the time-honored phrase, "Linesmen, Timekeepers, Scorekeepers — 
Ready, go !" and tossed the ball up between the centers, Miss Shearer 
and Mrs. Cruikshank. Miss Quackenbos was indeed the star of the 
Blacks, for as forward she threw in successive goals with dizzying 
rapidity. Miss Wilson playing side center for the Blues won great 
applause, for even when she fell down and had to be assisted to her 
feet by guardians appointed for that purpose, she came up smiling 
and continued to stop the ball with her usual success. In the second 
half, Rene Glass was the referee and she, too, carried out her part in 
a most business-like manner. The final score was 24-12 in favor of 
the Blacks and after it had been written in flourishing figures on the 
blackboard provided for the occasion, all who were not too convulsed 
with laughter gave a parting cheer for their respective teams and 
left the Gym, voting the game even funnier than the Faculty fray 
last year. 



36 



The St. Mary's Muse 



The line-up was as follows 

Blacks 
Cruikshank 
Marriott 

Bierce (Capt.) 
Quackenbos 
Morehardt 
St. John 



Centers 



Forwards 



Guards 



Blues 




Shearer 






Wilson 


(Capt.) 


Dennis 






Leggett 






Neave 
Bottom 






F. 


P. 


V. 



March 6 — Mus Win Second and Fourth Team Championships 

The biggest surprise of the Basket Ball season came off Saturday 
night, March 6th, when the Mus raked in thirty points at one fell 
swoop by defeating the Sigma Second and Fourth Teams. The 
game was called at eight-fifteen, as the Second Teams took their 
places. Edmundson and Brown played well together and were un- 
usually successful in evading their active guards, Smythe and Baum. 
So capably, on the other hand, did Wimberly and Villepigue hold 
Cole and Blakely down that the final whistle brought the game to 
a close with the score 27-9 in favor of the Mus. There was pretty 
playing in the center on both sides, especially on the part of Glass 
and Ballou. 

The line-up follows: 
Sigma 
Ballou 1 



Collier, E. 

Cole 

Blakeley 

Smythe 

Baum 



Centers 



Forwards 



Guards 



Mu 
Glass, B. L. 
Ashworth 
Edmundson 
Brown 
Wimberly 
Villepigue 



The Fourth Team game was closer, but again the Mus came out 
ahead, this time with a score of 28-19. Dunnock starred for the 
Mus, and the Nixon Twins were again fighting for the Sigmas. 



The St. Maky's Muse 



37 



Lilly's field shots were the feature of the game, however. This was 
"Little Nina's" athletic debut, and she bids fair to uphold the reputa- 
tion of her big sister. 

Following is the line-up for the second game : 
Sigma 



Taylor 
Cooper, D. 
Nixon, M. 
Lilly 

Nixon, D. 
Pegues 



Centers . 
Forwards 



Guards 



Mu 
Gresham 
Way 
Dunnock 
Lay 

Fitts 
Nolan 



March 11-12— The Model Meetings 

The last two "Model Meetings" were staged in the Parlor on 
Thursday and Friday evenings, March 11th and 12th. For several 
weeks both Literary Societies had been planning and preparing their 
programs, and remembering the first meetings of this kind, the whole 
School was looking forward to two pleasant evenings. Nor were they 
disappointed. Alternating from last time, the Sigma Lambdas had 
first place, so at seventy-twenty on Thursday evening the President, 
Lucy London Anderson, called the meeting to order and the contest 
began. 

Consistently following the idea of a "model meeting," after the 
roll had been called and the minutes read and approved, the chair- 
man of the several committees made their reports and the current 
events of the week were summarized by Audrey Stone. The Society 
then discussed the question of continuing the present plan in the 
Literary Societies next year, and those who were responsible for 
that plan may be glad to know that it met with general approval. 
The business of the meeting having thus been satisfactorily disposed 
of, the subject of the evening was announced as "Ireland" in honor 
of St. Patrick's Day so near at hand. The entire program was one 
of unusual interest and was exceptionally well rendered, the laurels 



38 The St. Maby's Muse 



going to Dorothy Baum, who talked about the legends of Ireland, 
and Fielding Douthat, Mary Louise Everett and Margaret Elliott, 
who presented a fanciful little Irish play, "The Traveling Man." 
The other numbers on the program were : 

"The Wearing of the Green" Chorus 

"Katie's Answer" Martha Best 

"A Little Bit of Heaven" Mary Ellen Travis 

After the critic's report, the meeting was adjourned and the 
audience dispersed, loud in the praises of the Sigma Lambda, and 
rather dubious as to the chances of the E. A. P. A good crowd was 
on hand, however, promptly the following evening, and the second 
meeting was opened by the President Jane Toy in the midst of con- 
siderable excitement. 

The roll was duly called, the minutes read and approved without 
comment, and the President then called for the report of the Pro- 
gram Committee, the chairman of which presented a plan for the 
remaining six meetings of the year, which was adopted by the So- 
ciety. Mattie Lou Newman reported for the Muse Editors on the 
progress of the Monthly, and the Society, acting on Patty Sherrod's 
motion, then gave a rising vote of thanks to the editors and contribu- 
tors to the Muse. The business was concluded by the President's 
reminder that the Debaters and Commencement Marshals would be 
elected at the next regular meeting, and the program for the evening 
was then announced to be the last preliminary debate of the season 
with the query, "Resolved: That the United States should adopt a 
policy of further material restriction of immigration." 

A debate is seldom a popular program, "model" though it be, but 
the appreciation of the audience testified to the fact that this one 
was unusually interesting. Nancy Lay and Millicent Blanton, on the 
Affirmative, presented a convincing argument, but the judges, Misses 
Sublett, Sherrod and Powell, decided in favor of the Negative, up- 
held by Catharine Boyd and Mary Yellott. The decision was an- 
nounced at the close of the E. A. P. song and the meeting was 



The St. Mary s Muse 39 



adjourned after the distribution of the new Muse, just come from 
the press. 

The final decision, two to one, of the contest judges, Mrs. Cruik- 
shank, Miss Searle and Mr. Stone, was in keeping with popular 
opinion. The Sigma Lambda meeting, presenting quite as "model" 
and a more interesting program, well deserved its victory, and the 
E. A. P.'s bade farewell to the coveted fifteen points with no hard 
feelings on either side. 



March 15— Mas Victorious in First Volley Ball Game 

The first Volley Ball game of the season was played in the Gym 
Monday night, March 15th. The teams were pretty well matched, 
but both showed a great need of more practice. Although most of 
the spectators were rather in the dark concerning the rules of the 
game and were doubtful as to the proper time to yell, there was no 
lack of pep and enthusiasm. Conspicuous among the Sigma players 
were Everett and Cooper. Mary Louise's playing was quite up to 
the Sigma yell, "Mary Louise: Sure to please!" and in the last 
Sigma serve it seemed almost too much for the Mus to down Mna. 
On the Mu side Villepique, or "Captain Piggy," was decidedly the 
star; she was astonishingly successful in stopping difficult balls and 
her serve contributed more than its share to the total score. Another 
Mu star was Dorothy Dodd. This was her first appearance in athle- 
tics and she lived up to the high expectations aroused from reports 
from the practices. 

In spite of the desperate efforts of the Sigmas, they were unable 
to prevent the Mus from keeping the lead they got in their first 
serve, and the game ended with the score 43 — 37 in their favor. 

The contestants were: 

Mu 



Sigma 




Hoke (Capt.) 


Villepigue (Capt.) 


Everett 


Dodd 


Cooper 


Kent 


Smythe 


Barber 


Cole 


Glass 


Thompson — E. Collier 


Simmons 



F. P. V. 



40 The St. Mary's Muse 



First Team Championship Goes to Sigmas 

On Saturday evening, March 27th, an expectant crowd piled into 
the Gym to witness the last and most exciting game of the basket ball 
season. The cheers on both sides were peppier than ever and did 
credit to the splendid leading of Martha Best and Peggy Edmundson. 

While lacking in the usual quick pass work and betraying a slight 
let-up in practice, the game was the stiffest and hardest fought of the 
season. Both teams did some splendid playing and again the guards, 
especially Jane Kuffin and Mna Cooper, starred throughout. Dor- 
othy Baum and Mary Bryan Wimberly, subbing in the center for 
Catharine Boyd and Harriet Barber, played a good game and 
proved themselves worthy substitutes for the regulars. At the end 
of the first half the score stood 5-4 in the Sigmas' favor and when the 
final whistle blew the score-keeper announced a tie, 9-9. 

Three tense minutes followed while Mus and Sigmas alike strug- 
gled for the ball. From end to end it whirled, in and out and in 
again, till suddenly with a quick spring "Moke" caught the elusive 
ball and threw it with unerring aim straight into the basket, thereby 
gaining eternal glory for herself and at the same time capturing 
thirty-five points for the Sigmas. 

The line-up was as follows: 

Sigma Mu 

Toy ) ( Kent 

Centers • 



Baum \ I Wimberly 

Hoke ) „ ( Yellott 



. Forwards . 
Underwood J j McCabe 

Cooper (Capt.) ) Guardg I Glass (Capt) 

Everett j J Ruffin 

C. B. 



The St. Mary's Muse 41 

Items of Interest 

The second of the series of preliminary debates were held in both 
Literary Societies on Wednesday evening, March 3d. The debates 
this year have been unusually good and these were no exception. In 
the Sigma Lambda Society Eugenia Thomas and Florida Kent were 
defeated by Audrey Stone and Jane MacMillan, upholding the Afir- 
mative of the query : "Resolved, That the Federal Government should 
compel arbitration in labor disputes." The E. A. P. query: "Re- 
solved, That Hoover is a better man for President than Wood," was 
debated by Dorothy Kirtland and Louise Egleston on the Affirmative 
and Jane Toy and Lorraine Smythe on the Negative. Here again the 
Affirmative proved the winning side. 

The modified quarantine was lifted on Sunday, March 7th, in or- 
der to enable the School to attend service at the Church of the Good 
Shepherd in the absence of Mr. Way. On the following evening 
Mile. Alda-'s concert in the Auditorium was a second occasion for the 
lifting of the quarantine, and those who had the pleasure of hearing 
Mile. Alda reported that hers was quite up to the earlier concerts of 
the series. The lingering quarantine was finally lifted on Sunday, 
March 14th, having served its purpose in that during the epidemic 
there was not a single case of influenza at St. Mary's. There were, 
however, no regrets expressed when the huge "Quarantined — No 
Admittance" sign was removed from the column on the porch of 
Smedes Hall. 

Two very creditable Thursday afternoon recitals were given by 
the Music Department on February 26th and March 11th. Miss 
Davis' pupils entertained the School on the intervening Thursday 
afternoon by giving one of their always popular Expression recitals. 

Wednesday evening, March 15 th, was the occasion of the Literary 
Society elections of the Annual Debaters and the Commencement 
Marshals. The Chief Marshal this year being a Sigma Lambda, 
this honor was conferred on Frances Venable, and the other girls 



42 The St. Mary's Muse 



elected by that Society were Katherine Waddell and Caroline Moore, 
Assistant Marshals, and Lucy London Anderson and Lena Simmons, 
Debaters. The E. A. P. Marshals elected were Dorothy Kirtland 
and Elizabeth JSTolan, and the Debaters, Jane Toy and Mary Yellott. 

An Inter-Chapter meeting of considerable interest was held in the 
Parlor on Friday evening, March 19th, under the auspices of St. 
Agnes', St. Anne's and St. Catherine's chapters. The subject of the 
meeting was mission work in the mountains of North Carolina, and 
in a very brief time Lena Simmons and Katherine Waddell pointed 
out some interesting facts about the mountain people and the work 
that is being done and remains to be done among them. 

A general exodus from St. Mary's took place on Saturday, March 
20th, when the School was allowed its spring week-end. A surpris- 
ing number of girls went home for this little holiday and the Seniors 
took full advantage of their privileges of visiting elsewhere, if they 
were unable to go home. 

We have lately had the pleasure of listening to several interesting 
and unexpected talks, on various subjects. On Wednesday evening, 
March 24th, Prof. Albert Bushnell Hart, one of Mr. Stone's college- 
mates, spoke to us in the dining-room of the woman of the future. 
Friday morning in Assembly, Miss Czarnomska, a former Lady Prin- 
cipal of St. Mary's, gave a little account of the St. Mary's of her day, 
and the following morning Miss Tillotson talked on the mission work 
of the Church. 



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lUre-Commencement JSumfoer 



CONTENTS 

Literary Department: page 

A Dream Mary T. Yellott 3 

The Course of True Love Louise Powell 4 ; 

The Playground as a Factor in Social Service Eleanor Sublett 11 

Candy and Corsage Lenore Powell 14 

In Fiducia Louise Egleston 17 

Indifference Wins Nancy Lay 18 

Concerning Crushes Lenore Powell 23 

Worth the Trouble Eleanor Sublett 26 

The B A II Song 28 

Sayings of Shakespeare as Applied to St. Mary's 30 

Editorial 31 

School News 33 

Items of Interest 42 

Advertisements 43 






The St. Mary's Muse 

PRE-COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 



Vol. XXV April, 1920 Xo. 7 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by The Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 

Editors 

Jane Toy Nancy Lay 

Eleanor Sublett 



A Drean) 

Maky T. Yellott, '20 
'Twas a little old garden, old-fashioned, 

And proud of its pretty defiance 
Of the modern conventionalism 

Demanded by gardening science. 

There were violets lurking in corners 

Half hidden by low-leaning trees, 
And lilacs in purple profusion 

Swung heavy perfumed in the breeze. 

The paths were a glory of jonquils — 
Great, gold-hearted goblets for sprites 

That sleep, poppy-lulled, in the daytime 
But dance in the moonlight o' nights. 

There were hyacinths, faint with their sweetness, 

And bright-painted tulips between, 
And jessamine, yellow as sunshine, 

And faintly perfumed as a dream — 

A dream of fair women, it may be; 

A dream of the days that are done; 
A dream of an old-fashioned garden, 
And jessamine, kissed by the sun. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



The Course of True Love 

Louise Powell, '22 

Mollie and Stan had weathered many storms and were none the 
worse friends for wear. Mollie was a Sophomore, Stan a Senior. 
By this time the High School crowd had paired them off, as High 
School crowds will do, to be nobody's property bnt each other's. 
This suited Stan; he adored Mollie — in fact, he had been adoring 
Mollie since the day "Prof." Edwards had demanded that the young 
lady leave her seat in the back of the study hall — where she was 
"evidently finding it inconvenient to study" — and take the "first 
seat, second row." Stan was in the first seat, second row. He had 
admired the cheerful, unembarrassed way in which Mollie had 
obeyed "Prof.," not to mention the sparkling brown eyes and the 
cloudy blond hair. As for Mollie, she had surrendered her heart 
completely when Stan slipped a piece of notebook paper in her hand 
with "I'm crazy about you" written on it. 

The two had been participants in many unfortunate scenes, which, 
they declared on their reunions after frequent "final" farewells, 
were only a proof of their undying affection for each other, because — 
"The course of true love, you know — " 

Mollie and Stan were in the Jackson's comfortable sitting room. 
It was a windy March and a cheerful lire crackled on the hearth. 
The rose-shaded floor lamp spread a pleasant glow over Mollie in 
her pink dress, seated beside Stan on the large Davenport. Nothing 
but peace should have pervaded this cheerful atmosphere, but strife 
was in the air. 

Stan inspected Mollie critically. 

"You'd be real good-looking tonight if your face wasn't so red, 
Mollie. What have you been doing to it?" 

"My face ? Why — why you've no right to ask me about my face ! 
I — I haven't done a thing to it!" Mollie managed to say indignantly, 
although she wondered inwardly if she could possibly have applied 
too much of Aunt Ethel's rouge. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



"Well, it looks mighty queer, but let's be cheerful. I never could 
understand why girls get touchy the minute you mention their looks 
to them." 

Molly closed her lips primly a moment before answering, which 
she did gently but somewhat cattily. "Stan, I'd expect little Eddie 
Williams to make such a remark, but hardly you. I can't think 
of one of the older -boys who'd deliberately comment on a girl's 
appearance unless he meant to be pleasant — it isn't exactly the thing 
to do." 

Stan grinned cheerfully. "I suppose Mr. R. Fulton Warner 
would never be guilty of such a breach of etiquette," he remarked 
teasingly. 

Mollie saw her chance. She brightened surprisingly and said 
easily, "He never has. I can always depend on Bobby to say the 
right thing. Are you going to Laura's dance ?" 

"What can I say ? I'd like to be of service also ! Shall I tell you 
your eyes are radiant as the stars that shine above?" pursued Stan. 

"I'm not talking about that, Stan," Mollie said petulantly. "Tell 
me if you're going to Laura's, Friday." 

"I guess so — we're both invited, aren't we ?" 

"Yes," innocently. "Who're you taking?" 

"Why, I thought I'd take you, Mollie. Isn't Friday night a 
standing date?" asked Stan, uneasily. 

Mollie turned toward Stan, a picture of surprise and disappoint- 
ment. "Oh, Stan," she said. "I didn't know. I'm so sorry! I 
promised Bobby. I thought it was a standing date except for 
parties." And Mollie looked very contrite, but down in her wicked 
little heart she knew she was fibbing. She awaited the customary 
outburst from Stan. To tell the truth, Mollie rather liked to irritate 
Stan; it was so much fun to get him "all heated up," as she ex- 
pressed it. But on rare occasions Stan was inconsistent. This 
was one. 

"Well, I'm sorry. I'll see you at Laura's. Save me a few dances. 
I guess I'd better go now ; I told Barnard I'd meet him at Smith's." 
Stan uttered these words with bored politeness. Mollie was pro- 
voked ; she was angry, too, because Stan hadn't taken the cue for an 



6 The St. Mary's Muse 



argument. However, not to be outdone in the least, Mollie rose 
and said sweetly, "I'm sorry you have to go. Did you leave your 
hat in the hall?" she added, with what Stan thought unnecessary 
consideration. 

"Don't bother; I'll get it," said Stan, gruffly, and followed Mollie 
to the door, which she obligingly held open for him. 

"Goodnight, Mollie," said Stan; then he paused. 

"Goodnight," answered Mollie with finality. 

So Stan departed, muttering savagely to himself. "Broke another 
date ! And she didn't even ask me to stay longer. That's the least 
she could have done. Don't think I'll meet Barnard after all." 
He stuck his hands in his pockets and walked gloomily home. 

When Mollie shut the door after Stan she gave way to her real 
feelings. She stamped her foot. "Hateful thing !" she thought. "He 
said my face was red and I just had a little bit of rouge on, and 
then he didn't even care when I told him I was going with Bobby. 
Oh!" impatiently, "I hate him!" 

Mollie walked petulantly upstairs to her room and began un- 
dressing. Her little sister Alice, who was always interested in 
Mollie's process of disrobing, came in to watch, very sleepy in her 
little night-gown, but none the less interested. 

"Is Stan gone, Mollie ?" asked Alice. 

"Of course. Do you think I'd be upstairs if he wasn't gone?" 
was her sister's cross reply. 

Cross replies never daunted Alice. Big sisters were apt to be 
cross sometimes. 

"Oh, Mollie ! Look at your face !" cried Alice. 

"What's the matter with it?" Mollie was alarmed now and ran 
to the mirror to inspect her much-slandered features. 

"Oh!" gasped Mollie. 

"Mother !" screamed Alice. "Come here quick ! Mollie looks just 
like me when I had the measles !" And Alice danced delightedly 
around the room. 

"I haven't!" stormed Mollie. "Go on to bed and let me alone! 
You're always in my way. There's nothing the matter, Mother," 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Mollie protested as Mrs. Jackson entered. "It's just that awful 
child. Can't you see I'm all right?" she begged. 

Mrs. Jackson surveyed her eldest daughter kindly, if critically. 

"I'm afraid Alice is right, dear. Get your clothes off as quickly 
as you can and get in bed. I'll phone Dr. Adams. And Alice, keep 
away from the room and don't tell the neighbors till we see how 
sick Mollie is. I'll be back in a minute, Mollie. Come on, Alice." 

Mollie flung her clothes over the chair and crawled disconsolately 
in bed, hot, uncomfortable and fighting back the tears. 

Mrs. Jackson came in softly and turned the light low. 

"Doctor will be here soon. How are you feeling now, dear ?" The 
sympathetic voice was too much for Mollie. 

"Oh, Mother," she choked, and started sobbing violently. It was 
so humiliating to have the measles ! 

Mollie was a beautiful invalid. She knew just how exacting to be, 
just how sweetly grateful for little favors. Mother was — well, just 
motherly. Dad stopped by every day before going to his office to 
tease and to leave a new dollar bill in her hand, and Alice was in 
her glory. She was a womanly little girl and loved to wait on people. 
She trudged up and downstairs many times a day to bring trays 
to the door of the darkened room. She was forbidden to go to school 
and, except for the times when her mother forced her to go out- 
doors to play, Alice stationed herself within range of the excitement, 
ready to answer bells and run errands. 

It was Mollie' s second day with the measles. She was uncomfor- 
tably conscious of the rash and secretly grateful that the room was 
dark. She didn't even want her mother to see her. "I know I'm a 
fright," she mourned to herself, "and oh, gracious, today is Thursday. 
Everybody'll go to the dance tomorrow but me, and everybody'll 
know I have the measles. Stan will laugh about it, and probably 
dance a lot with Nancy. Well, anyway, I haven't freckles on my 
nose!" (Nancy had.) "And Bobby will be sorry, but even he will 
go ahead and dance and have a good time. Why did it have to be 
measles ! It sounds so — so young." 

"Mollie," Mrs. Jackson broke in on her thoughts, "the doctor is 



The St. Makys Muse 



here. He's coming upstairs now." She smoothed the bed covers and 

laid a soft, cool hand on Mollie's feverish forehead. 

"Poor little girl," she murmured, and Mollie caught the cool hand 

and kissed it. Tears came to her eyes as she thought defiantly, 

"Mother cares." 

In the afternoon Mollie awoke from a restless sleep to hear 

Alice talking at the phone in the hall: "Oh, yes, Mollie's got tho 

measles. She looks awful funny. Really ? All right, I'll tell her. 

Goodbye." 

"Alice !" called Mollie, sharply. "Who were you talking to ?" 
Alice ran to the door, eager to display her helpfulness. She opened 

the door slightly, for she knew her mother was downstairs. 

"It was Stanford, Mollie," she whispered loudly; "and he says — " 
"You told Stanford I had the measles !" interrupted Mollie. 
"Well, you have, haven't you," consoled Alice, "and he says — " 
"I don't care what he says ! Go away ! Hush, Alice, I won't 

listen! Mother!" Mollie raised her voice. "Come here and make 

Alice go away!" 

"Wait just a minute," pleaded Alice. "Stanford told me to tell 

it 
you — 

"I told you I don't care wliat he told you ! If you don't go away 
this minute — " 

Mrs. Jackson arrived at this point to investigate. 

"Alice, what have you been doing?" 

"Nothing, Mother. Stanford just now phoned and Mollie won't 
let me tell her what he says, and she's going to make you send me 
outdoors!" This last was indignant. 

"If Sister doesn't want to hear about it, you mustn't bother her. 
You know she's sick and you mustn't disturb her. Run downstairs 
and see if the grocery boy has come." Thus Mrs. Jackson dismissed 
Alice, who left with her feelings very much hurt. When her mother 
came into the room Mollie was crying in her pillow. 

"You mustn't cry, Mollie. It might injure your eyes. Let me 
put this damp towel on them. Alice is little and doesn't understand 
how badly you feel — " 

"She didn't have to tell — Stan — I had — measles," Mollie wailed. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



A half-hour later Mrs. Jackson came into the room with a bowl 
of violets. 

"Feeling better?" she asked brightly. "Robert Warner brought 
these violets while you were sleeping. He was very pleasant and 
left this note for you. Shall I read it to you ?" 

"Please," said Mollie, smiling. It was nice to have flowers sent 
to one. The note was short, very solicitous, and mentioned her 
"illness." "That was nice of Bobby," thought Mollie. "Some people 
I know would have said measles/' 

"Mother," shouted Alice outside the door. "Here's a letter for 
Mollie." 

Mrs. Jackson brought it to the bedside, after reminding Alice not 
to be so noisy. "Here it is, Mollie." 

"It's from Stan, I reckon — yes, read it, too, Mother," said Mollie, 
hesitating, and Mrs. Jackson went to the window and began. "Hello, 
Measles. Isn't — " 

"Never mind, Mother ! Don't read it ! I don't want to hear it. 
Send it back, throw it away! I don't want it!" 

Her mother looked at her in surprise. "All right, dear, if you 
say so, but I'm sure Stanford didn't mean anything." 

"He never means anything. That's the trouble with him," ex- 
claimed Mollie, unreasonably. 

"Well, don't think about it, clear. I'm going clown to talk to Dad 
now. He's just come in. I'll leave your letter on the bed. If you 
want anything, call me." Mrs. Jackson left the room with a soft 
rustle. 

Downstairs she confided to her husband that she had never known 
Mollie to be so temperamental. "She seems especially sensitive to 
the fact that she has measles. I think it hurts her pride. The poor 
child asked me to read a note the Robinson boy sent her and simply 
because he made some teasing remark about her affliction, Mollie 
wouldn't listen to the rest of the note. I suppose she's nervous," 
ended Mrs. Jackson with a sigh. 

Mr. Jackson looked up quickly. "Wait a minute, Margaret. I'm 
going to tell the kid something that ought to cheer her up." And 
with a laugh he hurried upstairs. 



10 The St. Maeys Muse 

He pushed Mollie's door gently open. 

"Baby," he whispered. 

"Yes, Dad, but please don't call me Baby; I'm sixteen," replied 
his invalid daughter. 

"All right, Miss Mollie ; it shall be as you wish. Er — I saw Mr. 
Robinson down town today," Mr. Jackson paused. 

"Did you ?" answered Mollie, gazing unconcernedly at the ceiling. 

"You know his son Stanford right well, don't you ?" suggested 
Mr. Jackson. 

"Yes, sir, right." Mollie was squirming. 

"Well, I thought you'd like to know — Mr. Robinson said Stanford 
has the measles. Bye-bye." And Dad disappeared. 

Measles ? Stan ? Oh, it was all her fault ! Jumping out of bed 
and disobeying an order not to use her eyes, Mollie ran to the window 
to read Stan's note. "Hello., Measles! Isn't it great to be in the 
same boat ? They say misery loves company — " and so on. It was 
all nonsense, but so "nice and cheerful," thought Mollie, penitently. 
She forgave Stan instantly. It was so sweet of him not to blame 
her. She remembered the phone call and went for Alice. 

"Alice, what did Stan say the other day ?" 

"Well," said Alice, looking important; "he said, first he said, 
'Hello. May I—' " 

"Oh, leave that part out. What did he say that was important ?" 

"Lemme see — He said he had measles, but they weren't as bad as 
yours and he could stay up but not go out of the house, and for you 
to answer his letter. That's all." Alice smoothed the front of her 
dress approvingly. 

"Thank you, Alice," said Mollie almost reverently. 

Mollie did answer the letter as soon as she could and she wrote 
more besides. For days the letters flew back and forth between the 
two houses. Stan recovered first and waited impatiently for Mollie's 
appearance. Days came when Mollie could walk around the house 
and talk through the window to Stan when he passed by her home. 
This only added to Stan's impatience. After much waiting Mollie 
was released, completely well. It was nearly April. 



The St. Mary's Muse 11 



Dressed in white, with a blue straw hat partly hiding her fluffy 
hair, Mollie waited on the porch for Stan, holding her racket. They 
were going to play tennis with Bobby and Nancy. Mollie's eyes 
twinkled when she remembered how fretful she had been when she 
and Stan were last together. She jumped up and ran to meet him 
when she saw him coming. 

"Hello, Stan !" she called. 

"Well, Mollie, aren't you ashamed for giving me the measles?" 
he grinned happily as he approached. 

"And aren't you ashamed for accepting them from a mere girl ?" 
she retorted. 

"Not when the girl's you. Come on, let's go. Bob and Nancy 
are waiting. They think they're going to beat us, but they've got 
another think coming. Let's make it a love game!" Stan was en- 
thusiastic. 

Mollie stopped still in mock astonishment, dropped her racket, and 
clasped her hands. "A love game! Oh, Stan; this is so sudden!" 



Tl)e Playground as a Factor in Social Service 

Eleanob Sublett, '20 

Wide awake men and women throughout all the world have come 
to realize that social service is one of the greatest problems that we 
must face today. In fact, many people believe that we are living in 
an age of which the first and greatest problem is the social question. 
There are numerous phases of social work which are intensely in- 
teresting and of vital importance. One which is of especial interest 
and which appeals strongly to the girls of today is that part which the 
playground takes in social service. 

No person can work in any field of social service long without 
witnessing tragedy. Hunger, cold and needless pain — surely these 
are tragedies. But real tragedy is not reached until one has unveiled 
another picture — one which deals not with externals, but with the 
spirit of life itself. This is a picture of a life devoid of pleasure 
and play. The great educators and philosophers of today agree that 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 



play is as much a part of life as work ; that each day if complete in 
itself is made up of work, play and rest ; that play is not a prepara- 
tion for more work, but is a part of life itself. 

In ages past, before the crowded city districts commonly called 
slums grew up, mothers had always taught games to the little children, 
but the narrow city streets and the over-full tenement houses have 
furnished no place for such amusements, and the mother's hard work 
from morning till night has left her no time for it. The children, 
who live in these slums of the city and spend most of their time 
on the narrow crowded streets, at best can find in life only a grim 
struggle for existence, and are apt to be led into vice and crime. 
The public schools have for several years realized that they were 
not able to cope successfully with these city slum children. The 
rules and regulations of school are too severe, too stringent, to allow 
the proper development of the character and every-day life of these 
children. To make life complete for the children of the slums is 
the imperative obligation of the world of today. And it is to meet this 
obligation that the Playground Movement has arisen. 

Probably the most apparent benefit which comes from a Play- 
ground in the crowded slum districts is the great improvement that 
it causes in the health of these children. As we all know, outdoor life 
must be given to children if they are to become physically strong and 
healthy men and women. Experience has shown clearly that it can 
be given to the best advantage through joyous, spontaneous play. 
Properly directed play will make the children want to be outdoors. 
The surroundings about the Playground are clean and neat and in this 
way the children are led away fro mdirt and unhealthy surroundings, 
and the percentage of tuberculosis and other diseases so common in 
the slums falls considerably. This alone makes the Playground 
a very important factor in the field of social service. 

Viewed from another aspect, the importance of the Playground, 
while it may not be quite so apparent, is equally as great and of 
even more vital and enduring qualities. This is the improvement 
which it brings about in the moral character of the children. Children 
love a fair game ; they want to be treated "fair and square" and so, 
in turn, they treat their neighbors "fair and square." Nowhere is 



The St. Mart's Muse 13 

contempt for a "dirty player" or a "poor sport" more hearty than 
among the little newsboys, most of whom come from these same 
slums. So it is at the Playgrounds, where games are taught, played 
and thoroughly enjoyed, that the child's idea of honor is brought out 
and strengthened. Lack of resources for the use of leisure time is 
responsible for much immorality among these slum children. When a 
Playground is established affording a place where the energy of the 
children is given an outlet in play and fun of the right sort, expe- 
rience has shown that there is a great decrease in juvenile crime. 
Joy and pleasure have greater force than misery and pain. The 
proper development of the child's character prepares him for the 
part that he will take in life. It is essential then for the welfare 
of the future that his sense of honor and his desire to do the fair 
and square thing should be cultivated. The Playground can cultivate 
this love of honor and fair treatment among the children as nothing 
else can. 

Americanization! We all know that this is the great word of today 
— it should be our watchword, continually in our minds with reference 
to all social service. We may wonder what connection it can have 
with Playgrounds, but this is not hard to discover on a moment's 
consideration. We would laugh at the idea of social equality among 
the slum children — yet the question of equality is ever present and 
of just as great importance to them as to any one of us. On any 
Saturday afternoon a few years ago the streets of the West Side of 
Chicago were a battling ground for rough and tumble fights between 
the little Italian and Polish boys. National characteristics and in- 
ternational misunderstandings every bit as real to them as to us were 
the most frequent causes for quarrels. The Italian boys claimed that 
they were much "better society" than the little Polish boys, and vice 
versa, causing always an endless feud. The Italians and Poles were 
not alone, for Hungarians, Jews, Irish and Germans had many a fist 
fight caused by the same sort of quarrels. A playground and recrea- 
tion center was established in the neighborhood. JSTow, on any Sat- 
urday afternoon a long line of Poles and Italians, as well as Hun- 
garian, Irish and Germans, may be seen outside the door of the 
swimming pool, awaiting in perfect equality their turn. On a basket 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 

ball team a Jew, a Pole and an Irishman play side by side for the 
honor of the team. Consequently, these children forget their various 
races, and by proper training in leisure and play, and by joyful 
contact with other children, they are gradually promoting the spirit 
of Americanization. 

The Playground, then, has a unique and most important part in the 
Americanization of today, and it is paving the way for social read- 
justment as nothing else can do. 

We see now why it is that the Playground Movement is a vital 
factor in the field of social service. It is of great physical, moral 
and social value to the children of the slums. The opportunity which 
is afforded the Playground is a very great one, for it must not 
only supply a place for the child to live, but must prepare the child 
to continue living. It is out of his play life that the child develops 
his health, his muscles, his emotions, his will, his quickness of judg- 
ment, his sense of honor and his executive tendency. Through all 
ages play has been the fundamental form of education. Is it a wonder 
then that the Playground Movement is classed as one of the chief 
opportunities, as well as one of the most vital problems, with which 
we are met in the field of social service today ? 



Candy and Corsage 

Lenore Powell, '23 

'Twas ever a much-debated question with young men as to which 
to send, with young ladies as to which young men would send — 
candy or flowers. In the days when our grandmothers were young 
and maidenly, it is to be hoped that the feminine preference ran 
toward flowers. But who can help but feel a faint, almost an im- 
perceptible, suspicion that even they, on rare occasions, became so 
unaesthetic as to wish for candy? 

With children, the little lady's preference is poorly disguised. Is 
the adoring swain with his painfully plucked daisies or the dashing 
youth armed knowingly with a bag of all-day suckers, looked upon 
with greater favor? We regret to admit that it is undoubtedly the 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 

latter. He it is who, with the slightest touch of embarrassment, ac- 
knowledges the boldly coquettish smile shot out from under yellow 
curls lowered industriously over the desk. It is he who proudly 
takes the proffered books and escorts the little yellow-haired individual 
home. 

But with girls — girls, for example, of the St. Mary's age — the 
sentiment is, on most occasions, divided. There are those who are 
uncurably romantic. They are content to feast solely upon the 
long-stemmed red roses that "He" has sent. The words that he is 
evidently eager to "say with flowers" are music to her ears. On the 
other hand, there are numberless ones whose more prosaic souls crave 
nourishment. Their eternal cry is "Food! Food!" Why, they do 
not even endeavor to find a more elegant term for their heart's desire. 
They live in hope that the "expected" will be candy in some form, 
rather than a decorative corsage. Oh, the flowers are beautiful — 
yes ! But, then, to a starving mortal ! 

There is a time, however, when every single maiden in every 
single school and every single home all over the world dreams of 
and longs for flowers. This unusual, wrought-up condition comes 
on the victim, generally, about the Monday before Easter. The 
charming creatures whose strings of admirers are known to be the 
longest are chief among those who raise the moan, "Oh, I know I 
won't get any — I'm sure not to ! !Now, what must I do ?" And this 
despairing remark is fully as frequent : "Well, I've already got 
my bed in the Infirmary engaged. I wouldn't be seen Easter Sunday 
without flowers !" And so on, ad infinitum. Of course, there are 
some who bravely declare, "Oh, I don't care. It won't make a bit 
of difference to me. Why, I can have just as good a time without 
them — admiring the others !" But these are usually the hopeless 
ones, of whom there are very few. It is, indeed, an unusual girl 
who fails to cherish deep down in her heart, if not the full-fledged 
hope, at least a faint glimmer of the hope of an Easter corsage. 

When Easter dawns, clear and bright, and we are dazzled by the 
resplendent, colorful scene — a veritable flower garden of girls and 
corsages — it is hard to believe that a single maiden has been over- 
looked. It develops that the girls who prophesied themselves corsage- 



16 The St. Mary's Muse 

less are in raptures with five or six in their possession; she, who, 
methinks, a bit overconfident, predicted several, the owner of only- 
one. And, perhaps one or two of the really hopeless damsels shame- 
facedly receive boxes of Whitman's. Everyone is happy. It is a 
joyful occasion, and even she who deems herself unpopular because 
of her lack of flowers finds that it is, indeed, quite possible to enjoy 
and admire — "the others!" 



The St. Mary's Muse 



17 



Iq Fiducia 

Louise Egleston, '22 



['m just a battered fly-leaf 

Of a book mucb used and old, 
But doubtless you would marvel 

At tbe secrets I've been told. 
There's nothing really shocking, 

And they're all anonymous, 
3o the verdict of inspection 

Touches neither one of us. 
ind I'm such a dumb old record — 

Such a faithful confidante — • 
rhat the authors feel no tremors 

At their manuscripts extant. 
J'or I'll not betray the writers, 

Nor the faces that I knew. 
! fear you'd ne'er decipher, 

So I'll read you just a few 
)f the woes and wails and troubles, 

Of the joys and pleasures, too, 
rhat in such a mixed collection 

Bring a history to view: 



"One month of school is over! 

(October, nineteen eight)." 
"I plumb forgot my money, 

And yonder comes the plate!" 
"Great day, it's hot! — You tell it!" 

"I'm so hungry I could croak!" 
"Do we go to town tomorrow?" 

"I don't — I'm purely broke." 
"Did you know 'She's' taking dinner 

At the Yarborough today?" 
"Her beau?" "Oh, no; her 'cousin' " — 

"Shucks, I bet it's goat souflee!" 
"Did you hear about the burglar?" 

"I can't find my diamond comb." 
"Just twenty-one days longer 

And it's me for Home Sweet Home!" 
"It's Easter Day — and flowers? 

They would fill a room or two!" 
"The day before Commencement, 

And tomorrow school is through!" 



I know the hearts of schoolgirls 

From long experience, 
And it's inside dope I've shown you, 

Shown to me in confidence. 
So if ever you are questioned — 

As you're very apt to be — 
And the person wants the "straight stuff," 

Just you send him here to me. 



18 The St. Mauy's Muse 



Indifference Wins 

Nancy Lay, '20 

"Oh, I like Bill fine, but — I'm not in love with him!" Marian 
raised her pretty arms above her head and laughed heartily, much 
to the perplexity of Harriet, her chum, who sat perched upon the 
porch railing opposite her. 

"You're naturally hard-hearted, that's all, Marian," she said. 
"I don't see how you can be so indifferent. Bud certainly is wild 
about you." 

"Well, it is hard not to love him, considering whose brother he 
is and how much he is like you. I suppose it's because he's so adorable 
to me. If Bill should be as horrid to me as I am to him — I know 
I am horrid sometimes — I should die of a broken herat !" said Marian, 
more soberly. 

"Well, anyway, even if you do refuse to love my onliest twin 
brother, I bet you a chocolate soda I can beat you a love set of 
tennis. Let's go !" 

Gathering up their rackets and balls, the two girls wended their 
way in the direction of the tennis court. As they walked and gossiped 
(as girls will do) their conversation turned to the subject of the 
masquerade ball to be given that night at the Country Club. 

"I can't go, worse luck," sighed Harriet. "Mother's not well 
today, and I think I'd better stay home with her. I don't think Bud's. 
going, either; he said something to me about having to work tonight." 

"Bill not going?" asked Marian, opening her pretty blue eyes in 
amazement. "You tell him I say not to think of missing that party. 
I am absolutely depending on him. I haven't the faintest desire to 
uphold the wall all evening." 

"You a wall-flower V laughed Harriet. "That's a good 'un, 
Marian ! How about the rush you got last week at the College 
Dance ?" 

"Oh, don't," protested Marian. "You're positively sarcastic. Old 
girl, I'm sorry as can be that you aren't going — you know I'll miss 
you horribly." 



The St. Mary's Muse 19 

"What are you going to dress as?" asked Harriet, taking her 
position on the court. 

"I'm going as Pierrette/' Marian replied, "and I've been trying 
my best to get Bob to go as Pierrot, but he just won't take a hint." 

"Dense creatures, men, anyhow," commented Harriet. "But you'll 
look adorable as Pierrette. By the way, how do you like Bob ?" 

"Oh, well enough. I'm not crazy about him. Let's play." 

"Marian ! I believe Indifference is your middle name ! Are you 
ready ?" 

"Serve!" 

"Out!" 

"Oh, rats!" 

The night was warm and all was still except for the slight breeze 
which stirred among the brightly colored lanterns hanging in the 
little garden behind the clubhouse. Above hung the brightest lan- 
tern of all, the moon, big and round, smiling down on the peaceful 
scene. Inside, in the ball room, there reigned a gaiety anything 
but quiet. The room was filled with strange figures in fancy cos- 
tumes, quaint Colonial dames, demure Puritan maids, boisterous 
clowns. 

At one end of the room, lingering in the doorway, stood Pierrette. 
She was a dainty little figure, from the pom-poms on her tiny slippers 
to the fluffy golden curls that peeped beneath her tilted hat. Her 
red lips were parted in a smile and beneath the mask her bright eyes 
sparkled with suppressed excitement. She glanced around the room 
for a moment to see whether she could recognize any of her masked 
friends, then followed her partner into the crowd of dancers. 

Almost immediately her attention was attracted by a slender 
figure standing near the big French window. He looked as if he 
had been made for her partner — a perfect Pierrot ! His head was 
turned so that he did not see her as she passed. A sudden suspicion 
flashed into her mind — he certainly looked like Bill ! But, no — he 
was almost too good-looking and attractive. Her eyes followed him 
as she danced, and she found herself sadly neglecting her partners. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 

Soon she had danced with almost every one but Pierrot and his 
neglect was doubly apparent because of the likeness of their costumes. 
He was moving near her now; perhaps he would dance with her — 
and it was about time, she thought. 

"Pierrette, may I break ? Don't you know me ?" he asked, as 
she gave herself up to him, almost too gladly. Of course she knew 
now who this Pierrot really was. 

"Why, Bill, you've had me guessing all evening who in the world 
you could be. Harriet said you weren't coming, but she gave you 
my message ; didn't she ? What do you mean by not dancing with 
me sooner ?" 

"Well, to tell you the truth," answered Bill, "there were so many 
other pretty girls to look after that I hardly — oh, too bad!" as 
George Washington broke. "We'll continue in our next." 

"So many other pretty girls ! Well, I like his nerve," thought 
Marian, indignantly. That wasn't like Bill. He was generally 
rather gushing and never had the audacity to mention another girl 
when he was with her. Soon, she thought, he would be asking her 
to sit a dance out with him in the garden, and then, for the sixteenth 
time, he would throw his heart at her feet. Contrary to her custom, 
she didn't seem to resent the idea; she would probably enjoy it 
tonight, for he was looking so handsome in his fancy costume. 

"He is good-looking," she thought, "but he certainly is acting 
queerly." 

"Marian ?" It was Bill at her elbow. "Will you go in to dinner 
with me ?" 

"Oh, I might," she answered, with the indifference which had be- 
come habitual in her relations with Bill. 

"You might ? Well, don't trouble yourself," he flung back at her 
as he turned away. 

Now, this was queer ; it was unaccountable ; and it made Marian 
feel decidedly aggrieved. She went in to dinner with Bob and had 
a miserable time ; Bill continued to ignore her. 

Once back in the ball room, Marian managed to push her way 
through the crowd and out into the cool, dark garden, where she 
flung herself down on a bench. She felt like crying. Bill had 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 

never treated her like this before. But why should he make so much 
difference? Did she really care for him after all? Perhaps he 
had become tired of her and cared for some one else. She bea'an 
to realize how attentive he had been to her ever since she could 
remember, and how utterly indifferent she had been to him. It 
had always been taken for granted that Bill belonged to her, and 
this sudden change in his attitude towards her was a shock which 
shattered her usual self-possession. 

So engrossed was she in her thoughts that she did not hear a 
light step in the grass as Bill came up behind her. 

"Aren't you going to speak to me, Marian?" he asked. 

"Oh — oh, is it you, Bill?" Startled, she raised her eyes, but 
could hardly see him in the darkness. 

"You've been crying, Marian. What's the matter?" 

"Matter? I— oh, nothing." 

"Tell me, little girl. I know something's troubling you. I didn't 
mean to bother you at all tonight, because you haven't seemed to 
care lately. But I missed you, and had to come and look for you." 

He sat down by her and Marian began nervously tearing the 
petals from a rose. 

"I've been terribly horrid to you, Bill," she began in a penitent 
voice, "but I didn't think it would matter, until tonight when you 
wouldn't pay any attention to me — I almost d — died!" 

She broke off in a sob, and suddenly turning away from him, she 
ran up the path and disappeared through the side door of the club- 
house. Extracting Bob from the crowd of dancers she plead a head- 
ache and asked him to take her home. Good-natured Bob was all 
solicitude and went at once for his car. Waiting on the porch, Marian 
saw a familiar figure approaching through the shadows. 

"Good night, Bill," she whispered, without looking up. "I really 
do care !" 

]STo sooner had the glare of the headlights died away than a second 
roadster followed. Pierrot was leaving, too, but not in chagrin as 
might be supposed, for there was a smile of evident triumph on 
his handsome face. Having reached home, he dashed up the steps 
and into the library. There, seated at a desk and poring over a book, 



22 The St. Maky's Muse 

was a young man, strangely like Pierrot ; so like, indeed, that except 
for the difference in dress it was almost impossible to tell them 
apart. 

Pierrot threw himself down on the couch and as he pushed lib 
cap aside an avalanche of curls fell around his shoulders. These 
smiling lips and merry brown eyes could belong to no one but Harriet. 

"Oh, Bill, my own darling Buddy, she is absolutely yours ! Oh, 
I know you think I'm crazy, but give me time and I'll explain. She's 
loved you all along, and just didn't know it. It was indifference 
that did it !" 



The St. Mary's Muse 23 

CoQcerniQg Crushes 

Lenore Powell, '23 

Sara, notwithstanding her unmistakably sensible name, had a 
decided weakness for crushes. The crush might be bovish and 
funny; maidenly and charming; fascinating and indifferent — oh, 
she might possess almost any such deadly attractiveness, and in- 
variably Sara "fell." She showered each in her turn with flowers 
— violets preferred. Sara cherished in the depths of her heart a pic- 
ture of her ideal girl, and never did this lovely apparition lack 
violets — with candy and with fruit. Sometimes, though not often, 
she grew bold enough to proffer little books of poems — impossibly 
sentimental poems. Her greatest source of annoyance, perhaps, was 
the constant battling within herself as to whether she could really, 
really and truly, be so heartless as people accused her of being. They 
said she was fickle. Was she really ? I wonder ! 

It was quarter of ten— just five more minutes before she would 
have to be in her room, and Sara was bewailing the fact that she 
had not had a glance at Margaret since Chapel. (Margaret, by the 
way, was her "latest.") It was cruel that she had to go to bed 
without one brief, delicious little good-night kiss. Sara never dreamed 
of expecting more than a second of this bliss. Somehow she felt 
trembly in the presence of Margaret ; Margaret, who, unlike all the 
others, was dashing and at the same time dignified ; Margaret, whose 
adorable dimples seemed to contradict the firm red lips. Her nearness 
rendered Sara quite breathless, and just a wee bit light-headed. 
Sara assured herself that it had never been like this before. 

Her well-meaning roommate (whose name was Josephine, but 
who could be called nothing but Jo) seemed unusually irritating 
tonight with her good-natured jokes. 

"Didn't kiss her good night, did you, Sara ?" she began, teasingly. 
"Oh, well, don't you mind, even if I did see two other little nuts 
hanging around her door, trying — " 

"Oh, hush, hear, Jo ?" Sara was cross. "Tonight of all nights," 
she said to herself, "to be worrying me." 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 

"Well, if you don't want me to tell you what she — " 

"Have you — have you really been talking to her, Jo ? Oh, and 
what did she say ? She didn't — oh, of course she didn't mention me? " 

"But she did ! Here's exactly what she said." 

"Yes ! What was it ? Oh, go on, Jo. You're — you're too slow 
for words." 

"I'd like to know how can I, when you interrupt me every minute ? 
I was just saying — as I was passing by her door, where Jane and 
Alice were hanging around, looking like two little lost — oh, all right, 
I will. Well, she called me over there and, Sara, she took me off 
all by myself and said, 'Tell your sweet little roommate I missed 
seeing her tonight.' That's exactly what she said. Sara, she's vamp- 
ing you hard." 

"Wasn't — wasn't it sweet of her to — to say that ? Oh, the darling 
thing!" and Sara relapsed into speechlessness, quite awed and alto- 
gether happy. She went to bed, contented, and in a few seconds 
was sound asleep. 

]STo one knows just when it was that Sara had her great adventure. 
Man does not reckon time as measured by one in Dreamland. Suffice 
it to say that Sara, all too soon, found herself in the strangest, severest 
of buildings, confronting the strangest, severest-looking individual she 
had ever seen — an individual in the shape of a spare, black-taffeta- 
clad lady who looked to be at that elastic age which some people 
term the prime of life. She was the personification of iron will. 
Her rebellious, wiry gray hair bore witness to this; her sharp, un- 
flinching black eyes strengthened it; but her thin, tyrannical nose 
left no doubt of it. Lo, this dread spectre was speaking, and, horrible 
to relate, she was addressing none other than the helpless Sara. 

"Your name, I think, is Sara Webb. Isn't it ? My, my, child, 
it is Sara Webb; you know very well it is. Stop cringing so and 
speak up." 

But Sara was silent. It is doubtful whether any power in heaven 
or on earth could have brought speech from the terrified "child" at 
that moment. 

"So ! I see you won't talk. Stubbornness, no less ! We don't 
countenance that, child, as you'll learn soon enough. And first of all, 



The St. Mary s Muse 25 



let me say that our rules, which are numerous and stringent, must 
be obeyed ab-so-lute-ly. Do you understand?" 

Sara stirred under her covers. 

"Why do you stand stupidly holding your bag? Put it down 
immediately. Don't — don't whimper t Sara ; nothing is so disgusting 
in so large a girl. You must be fifteen at least. Of course, I have 
to guess. You, to all appearances, are quite dumb." 

The lady paused for breath. 

"I shall enumerate a few of the rules of the school. It is well 
that they be duly impressed from the start. You have the manner 
of a brainless, silly little girl. No doubt you are given to crushes. 
Eh," accusingly. "Ah ! I see you are ! I can't imagine where you 
have been, to have been allowed to indulge in such frivolity. Oh, 
that is far too mild a word. Such inexcusable misbehavior, I should 
say. This inane worship of a girl is stupid beyond all words. Do 
you hear? It is, I say, it is!" 

The lady-in-black was trembling, and her tones waxed shrill. 

"Perhaps, perhaps, Sara," sarcastically, "you aren't aware that 
this is an offense that calls for no less severe treatment than expulsion. 
Expulsion! As soon as a girl is discovered in such misdemeanor, 
our decision is irrevocable. Irrevocable, I say! She is sent home 
in the deepest disgrace !" 

Her voice emphatically loud, the thin, black-clad lady quavered 
as she reached her climax. She was dreadful to behold. 

With a nervous shiver Sara jumped up in her bed. "Oh, Jo, Jo, 
did you hear that?" 

Jo opened a pair of drowsy eyes and muttered, "Um-m-m, d-d-did 
you say the — the bell's rung ?" 

"No, no, not that !" With a relieved sigh Sara snuggled down again 
beneath the covers. "Oh, I'm so glad it's not true," she thought. 
"I — I wonder what Margaret is dreaming about I" 



26 The St. Maky's Muse 



Worth the Trouble 

Eleanok Sublett, '20 

Buz-z-z sang the alarm clock. Patty sat up in bed, reached for 
the offending timepiece, and silenced it with difficulty (this was a 
new experience to her). But this morning was different from other 
mornings. Today was Class Day, tomorrow the last day of school ! 

"I'm so sleepy," murmured Mildred, her roommate. "What time 
is it, Patty ?" 

"Five-thirty," was the sleepy reply, "but such is the life of a 
Junior ! Let's get up before we go to sleep again." 

Exactly eight minutes later Patty and Mildred tiptoed down the 
shadowy hall They joined a large group of girls already busily 
working, surrounded by masses of daisies. 

"It's time you were coming, sleepyheads/' said Betty, their en- 
thusiastic president, as wide awake as usual. "Get to work fast. 
Patty, you wrap; Mildred, you bunch, please." 

"I never worked so hard in my life," exclaimed Mildred a half 
hour later. "And the sad part is the Seniors don't appreciate it one 
bit." 

"Oh, yes they do," put in Katherine. 

"Well, sure thing we'll appreciate it when we are Seniors. Just 
think, the Juniors will be making it for us this time next year!" 
added Patty. 

And so they talked and laughed together, yet not a second was 
wasted. 

"Gracious, there's the rising bell!" called Mildred. "A yard 
for every Senior — will we ever finish ?" 

"Pour more yards to make in thirty minutes. Go to it hard, 
girls!" encouraged Betty. 

"The breakfast bell ! Oh, shoot," was Patty's next exclamation. 
"I've only five more inches to make. Mildred, do come help me." 

"Goody," they exclaimed together a few seconds later, "we are 
through at last!" 

A happy crowd of twenty ran breathlessly up the steps and just 
managed to slip through the dining room door. Their dresses were 



The St. Mary's Muse 27 



wet and muddy and their hands were none too clean. But their 
faces were shining with pride as well as lack of powder. 

"We finished twenty-four yards! You know we are smart/'" 
announced Patty at the breakfast table. "And even if I do say it 
as shouldn't, it's the prettiest daisy chain I ever saw." 

After breakfast the twenty happy Juniors, obeying Betty's parting 
instruction, "Don't forget to come clean up," met again. In a few 
minutes the room was spick and span. 

Then, "Everyone come fix the grove," ordered Betty joyfully. 
"Don't you marshals work too hard, or you will be all tired out." 

At eleven o'clock the grove was filled with laughing, talking people. 
Mothers and fathers, sisters and friends of the graduating class were 
everywhere. Suddenly there was a hush. The school, arranged 
according to classes, each class led by a marshal whose blue regalia 
pointed her out to the assembled crowd, came two by two singing 
"In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees." They took their places and 
waited — everyone waited. 

"There they come," whispered Katherine to Mildred. 

And, sure enough, they were coming. Betty, as chief marshal, 
led them — the Seniors ! Slowly they came through the arch of roses, 
carrying the precious daisy chain. They reached their chairs ; then 
gently and even sadly laid the heavy rope of white and gold at their 
feet. 

"They do appreciate it ; they do, Mildred," murmured Patty. "Oh, 
I'm going to cry ! No, I am not," she corrected herself. "I'll be a 
fright." . 

"Patty," said Mildred, putting her arm around her roommate, it 
was worth ten times the trouble, wasn't it?" 
"You bet it was I" agreed Patty. 



28 



The St. Mary's Muse 



The E A n Soog 

Words by Mary T. Yellott, '20 Music by Louise A. Eggleston, '22 



The St. Mary's Muse 



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30 The St. Mary's Muse 



SayiQgs of Shakespeare as Applied to St. Mary's 

"Our revels now are ended." — Monday night. 

"Some of us will smart for it."— Caught with the goods. 

"Condemn the fault and not the actor of it ?" — Never. 

"And oftentimes excusing of a fault 

Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse." 

— Reporting after lunch. 

"They say we are almost as like as eggs."— The Nixon Twins. 

"Flat burglary as ever was committed."— The Senior Hall episode. 

"A very ancient and fish-like smell."— Friday night. 

"They have been at a great feast of languages and stolen the 
scraps." — French and Spanish tables. 

"They are as sick that surfeit with too much as they that starve 
with nothing." — Thanksgiving and Easter. 

"For there was never yet philosopher 

"That could endure the toothache patiently." 

— Dr. Pegrams Patients. 
"My pride fell with my fortunes." — Broke. 
"Answer me in one word." — Mr. Stone. 
"Devise wit, write pen." — M. English. 
"I am slow of study." — Most of us. 
"Give thy thoughts no tongue."— Study Hall. 
"Fill all thy bones with aches." — Gym. 

"I am never merry when I hear sweet music.' 5 '— Ma Sweet's Gals. 
"Lord, what fools these mortals be!" — Crushes. 
"Stand not upon the order of your going 
But go at once." — Miss St. John to the Seniors on Third Floor. 
"When I was at home I was in a better place." — The Prep Sept 
18, 1919. 

"0, call back yesterday, bid time return I"— The Senior, May 25 
1920. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subicription Price Two Dollars 

Single Copies Twenty-five Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1919-20 
Mary T. Yellott, '20, Editor-in-Chief 
Catharine Miller, '20 Catharine Boyd, '20 

Crichton Thorne, '23 Mabel Norfleet, '23 

Frances Venable, '22 Louise Powell, '22 

Jane Ruffin, '20, Business Manager 
Ernest Cruikshank, Faculty Director 



EDITORIAL 

The year is nearly over, "for better or for worse." That, of course, 
depends upon how you look at it, and some look in one way and 
some another. If you count it "for better" to have come in contact 
with many girls and to have made close friends with a few ; to have 
been introduced to new fields of study, in which you may wander 
to your heart's content and your mind's edification; to have been 
given the opportunity to share "St. Mary's Spirit" which has meant 
so much to so many girls in the past — if you count all this "for 
better," why, so much the better then. If you count it "for worse" 
to have misused these opportunities, to have shut yourself up within 
yourself and made close friends with none; to have regarded much 
study merely as a weariness to the flesh and in consequence have 
slackened in the pursuit of learning; to have mistaken the "St. 
Mary's Spirit" for a mere topic of conversation among pious people 
who had nothing else with which to amuse themselves — if you count 



32 The St. Mary's Muse 



all this "for worse," then, indeed, so much the worse. And yet, if 
you do count it "for worse," in a way, so much the better, too, for, at 
least you realize that you have missed something that might have 
been yours. 

The reason people prefer an old school to a new one is not because 
its work is necessarily better; it is because of the traditions which 
enshroud the most commonplace facts of its existence in a sort of 
romance; it is because of the indefinite, intangible, but perfectly 
apparent "Spirit" which pervades it. It is that St. Mary's Spirit 
working, perhaps, unconsciously, upon you and within you which 
to your surprise, impels you to answer, "Oh, I love it !" to the question 
"How do you like St. Mary's ?" instead of the terse "Hate it !" you 
may once have thought you would reply. Tor it is that Spirit which 
lives on through the years when the sad memory of the times you 
were restricted when you wanted to go out has quite faded into 
oblivion. Those are the memories which, fortunately, always die 
young. There are others which live to a ripe old age, and grow 
mellower with time. Such are the memories of our schoolgirl friend- 
ships, which may fade indeed, but which a familiar song, a well- 
remembered bit of poetry, the sweetness of a rose may recall in the 
full vigor of their youth. 

After all, it is these friendships, cemented through long days of 
work and play together, that make school life so thoroughly worth 
while. An admiration for Horace and Virgil is a fine thing in its 
way, but it will never afford the same sort of satisfaction as that 
produced by an admiration for the Latin teacher, or the girl who 
shared your book in class— not a silly, sentimental sort of foolishness, 
but a deep, enduring friendship based on a recognition of her ad- 
mirable qualities. 

"Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, 

Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel," 
advises Shakespeare, and his advice is good. Never lose track of 
an old friend ; never miss an opportunity to make a new one. Ac- 
cording to a still more ancient authority — 

"Believe me, a thousand friends suffice thee not; 

In a single enemy thou hast more than enough." 



The St. Mary's Muse 33 

SCHOOL NEWS 
April 10 — Domestic Art and Expression Pupils Entertain 

With the able assistance of Miss Leggett and Miss Davis, the 
Second Year Domestic Art pupils gave a novel Fashion Show in 
the Auditorium Saturday evening, April 10th. Instead of merely 
passing across the stage in a revue, as was naturally to be expected, 
they showed off their fine new dresses by means of an attractive 
little pantomime, "Tables Turned," written by Miss Davis for the 
occasion. The aforementioned "fine new dresses" ranged from hand- 
some taffetas and satins to dainty organdies, and were most stylish 
and Parisian-like. The most remarkable thing about them was 
the fact that the proud owners had made every stitch themselves. 
And the owners have indeed a perfect right to be proud, for they 
have set an example which has fired the ambition of the "Beginners." 

Immediately after the Fashion Show, a two-act play entitled 
"Captain Jo" was presented by the Private Expression pupils, under 
the direction of Miss Davis, The little play was very entertaining, 
and, being written about college girlSj it was well adapted to the 
audience. The girls took their parts extremely well. Especially good 
were Lorraine Smythe, who played the heroine, and Daisy Cooper, the 
little Freshman, "crushed" on Captain Jo. 

The cast of characters was as follows : 

Josephine Scott, "Captain Jo" Lorraine Smythe 

Mildred Linn, her roommate Josephine Dixon 

Kate Winston, second team forward Annie Lee Edwards 

Pat Dickinson, class president Lucille Hardy 

Sue Carpenter, unathletic Jean Gales 

June Powell, the little Freshman Daisy Cooper 

Cheer Leader Peggy Bdmundson 

C. B. 



April 13— Mas Win Yolley-Ball Championship 

On Monday evening, April 12th, an excited and enthusiastic crowd 
was on hand in the Gym to witness the second and last game of the 



34 The St. Maet's Muse 

Volley-Bail season. Both teams played well and the game showed 
considerable advance over the preceding one. The Sigmas, well 
aware that the Mus had won the last game, played with might and 
main. The Mus, however, were able to hold their own and the score 
was close until the very end, when the scorekeeper announced the 
Mus victorious by one point — 33 to 32. 
The line-up was as follows : 

Sigma Mu 

Hoke (Capt.) Villepigue (Capt.) 

Everett Dodd 

Cooper Kent 

Smythe Barber 

Cole Glass, E 

Everett Simmons 

C. B. 



April 13 — The Junior Auxiliary Sends Delegates to Oxford 

At twelve o'clock on Tuesday, April 13th, Miss Katie, representing 
the Woman's Auxiliary, and Susan Collier, ISTina Cooper, Elizabeth 
Thomas and Katherine Batts, representing the Junior Auxiliary, 
forgot such a thing as school in leaving for Oxford to attend the 
Woman's Auxiliary Convention of the Diocese of ISTorth Carolina. 

Of course Miss Katie was a regular delegate, but the rest went 
primarily to make a modest report of the Auxiliary work at St. 
Mary's and to show wherein our Blue Ridge delegates are of import- 
ance, and thus to endeavor to make an indirect appeal for funds that 
some of the girls of '21 might have ten of those days of jolly good 
fun and indescribable inspiration, besides training for "carrying on" 
next year. Too, we wanted to learn of the new organization of the 
old Junior Auxiliary, which is non-existant now. But it is replaced 
by the big organization, the Church School Service League, which 
includes all church work of boys and girls under twenty-four. 

We were royally entertained; we were shown the beautiful little 
town of Oxford; we heard the endless reports from the various 
branches with interest ; and returned Wednesday night full of our ex- 
perience, which was described Thursday night in the School Room 



The St. Mary's Muse 35 

instead of the usual Thursday Night Talk. Moreover, in our short 
stay we had accomplished our task. Our reports were made Wednes- 
day morning, and when the President of the Auxiliary returned 
from the Convention she reported that one hundred and fifteen 
dollars had been promised for a Blue Eidge Fund, and that there 
were hopes of its being increased. 

K. G. Batts. 



April 22— The Inter-Society Debate 

The St. Mary's Auditorium was the scene of a spirited contest 
Thursday evening, April 22d, when the Sigma Lambda and Epsilon 
Alpha Pi debaters met in the annual battle of words. The stage was 
simply decorated with St. Mary's banner and the Society pennants, 
with a table in the rear of the center for the presiding officers and 
one on each side of the stage for the debaters. The girls came in, 
brave in their Society colors, and took their places, the Sigma Lamb- 
das to the right of the Auditorium, the E. A. P.'s to the left. The 
air was tense with suppressed excitement. 

At 8:15 the Chief Marshal announced the readiness of the judges, 
and the debaters appeared upon the stage. As it happened this year 
that both Presidents were debating, the Vice-Presidents took their 
places, and Millicent Blanton opened the meeting, announcing the 
query for the evening: "Resolved, That the United States should 
grant the Philippines independence within a period of three years." 
The first speaker for the Epsilon Alpha PL, upholding the affirmative, 
was Jane Toy, who delivered a clear, concise argument with evident 
conviction in the right of her side. She was followed by Lena Sim- 
mons, first on the negative, who presented her argument in her usual 
decisive and convincing manner. Mary Yellott, second on the affirma- 
tive, resumed the work her colleague had begun, concluding with an 
earnest plea for the recognition of the Filipinos' right to independ- 
ence. The last speaker was Lucy London Anderson, representing the 
Sigma Lambda for the third time, and again justifying their faith 
in her by her clear, well-delivered speech. The rebuttals were ex- 
cellent, showing quick thought and a good knowledge of the subject. 



36 The St. Mart's Muse 

Upon the conclusion of the final affirmative rebuttal Kainsford Glass 
rose and made the annual announcement : "The audience will stanc 
and sing 'Alma Mater' while the judges are rendering their decision.' 
Of all the memories awakened by the familiar air, none are mor< 
vividly recalled than those few minutes of suspense, especially nerve 
racking to the debaters, torn as they are between relief that it is alii 
over and anxiety as to the final outcome. At length the Chief Marshal 
Trances Venable, had collected the three slips, and just at the close- 
of the first stanza she reappeared and handed them to the waiting 
officials. There was silence while, with trembling fingers, they tort 
open the envelopes; silence for a moment after the announcement 
"The decision is in favor of the affirmative," Then the echoes wer( 
awakened by the cheers of the E. A. P.'s, triumphant for the firs' 
time in several years. 

The papers showed careful preparation, and much of the credii 
for them is due to the invaluable assistance of Miss Dennis in getting 
them up, and of Miss Davis in putting on the finishing touches. Th( 
final result was well worth the time and energy expended upon it 
for the Debate was pronounced one of the best and most interesting 
ever given at St. Mary's. 



April 24— The Spring Meet 

At four o'clock on Saturday afternoon. April 24th, the outdooi 
basket ball courts regained for a time their long-lost popularity, ano 
for the next two hours they were the center of attraction to Mus anc 
Sigmas alike, thus including the entire School. During the courst 
of the afternoon if there were ten girls who were not out on the: 
courts they were very little in evidence elsewhere. And the caus< 
of all this excitement ? The Spring Meet, of course ! The Mus wer( 
fighting for the seven points which would mean the year's champion 
ship for them; the Sigmas were out in full force after the twelv< 
which would give them another chance at the banner by winning th< 
Tennis Tournament. With so much at stake, both sides were read^ 
to fight to the finish. 



The St. Mary's Muse 37 



The first event was the Goal Shooting Race, run off this year in 
;wo divisions, because only one goal was available. The Sigmas 
Irew the first run, and their forwards' basket-ball practice here stood 
;hem in good stead, for they won the race by 10 seconds. In the 
Shuttle Eace they were again victorious, and things began to look 
cather black for the Mus. The tension, however, was relieved at 
jjiis point by the Suitcase Eace, most amusing to the spectators and 
iestructive to umbrellas, which resulted in a victory for the Mus. 
text came the 50-yard Dash, in which the Sigmas triumphed again, 
Nma Cooper winning first place and Mary Hoke second. This was 
followed by the Long Distance Throw, in which the number of con- 
testants was unlimited and in consequence almost every member of 
both Associations took part. In this the greater total of inches beyond 
the 40-foot mark counted 4 points and the champion throw 1, and 
both of these went to the Mus, thanks to the strong arm of Dorothy 
Dodd, making the score at this stage of the game 7 to 6 in the Sigmas' 
favor, and leaving the Eelay Eace to "end everything." And it did, 
so far as the Mus' hopes of the Meet were concerned. For again the 
Sigma runners came out ahead, securing the 5 points necessary to 
make up the coveted 12. So the Meet ended, with a score of 12 to 6, 
making the year's score 66 to 47, with the odds in the Mus' favor, but 
leaving the 20 points for the Tennis Tournament to determine the 
championship for the year. 



April 24— Estelle Avent's Song Recital 

The first of the Certificate Becitals took place in the Auditorium 
Saturday evening, April 24th, when Estelle Avent, certificate pupil 
of Mr. E. Blinn Owen and Mr. William H. Jones, gave her Song 
Eecital. 

The stage had been tastefully decorated by her friends with dog- 
wood and roses, and made a lovely background for the white-clad 
figure of the young artiste, whose sweet voice completely charmed her 
enthusiastic audience. Her most difficult number, "Una Voce" from 
"Barber of Seville," Miss Avent handled with ease and skill, but 



38 The St. Mary's Muse 



perhaps the most popular was her final encore, "Me and My Little 
Banjo," which she had to sing again and again before the applause 
subsided. She was assisted by her instructor, Mr. Jones, who had 
good reason to be proud of his pupil. 
The program was as follows : 



Wood-wandering Grieg 

SyIvelin '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.Sinding 

Serenade Strauss 

II 
Aria: 'Una voce" ("Barber of Seville") Rossini 

III 

Danse r> , 

Debussy 

William H. Jones 

IV 
Three Notes: Three Words Jones 

The Danza ^, ', . , 

Chadwick 

Moonlight Song ^^ 

The Joy of Spring Woodman 



April 2*— "Blue Kidge Night" 

The Inter-Chapter Meeting of the Junior Auxiliary held in the 
Parlor on Sunday evening, April 25th, was under the direction of 
the Blue Eidge Delegates, from which the name "Blue Ridge Night," 
which they had been planning ever since their return from the Con- 
ference last summer. Katherine Batts, the President of the Auxiliary 
opened the meeting, and the Rector introduced the first speaker, Mr. 
George Denney, a Carolina delegate, and an admirable example of 
"what Blue Ridge does for boys." He made an earnest little talk 
on the importance of putting the summer months to good use and 
the advantages of Blue Ridge in this connection. Mrs. Bickett then 
spoke very complimentarily of last year's delegates and expressed the 



The St. Mart's Muse 39 

hope that the girls this year would be equally as enthusiastic. The 
concluding number on the program was the presentation of the little 
play the Blue Ridge delegates gave last summer at Oxford and Hen- 
derson to show what the Conference had meant to them. 

It was a short but inspiring meeting, and a fitting preliminary to 
the elections of the delegates for 1920, held the following week. 



April 26— Nancy Lay's Piano Recital 

The second of the series of Recitals was that of Nancy Lay, cer- 
tificate pupil of Miss Sue Kyle Southwick. The piano recitals are 
not, as a rule, looked forward to with any great anticipation on the 
part of the School, but this one was an exception, partly because of the 
Senior President's popularity ; partly because she had played before 
and established her reputation. Assisted by Estelle Avent, she gave 
one of the most enjoyable recitals held in the Auditorium in years. 

Again the stage was decorated with dogwood and flowers, the gifts 
of admiring friends. Miss Lay's real talent as a pianist was evident 
throughout her program, which included selections from famous 
composers. She was especially successful in her interpretation of 
MacDowell's "Polonaise." The program follows: 

Sonata, op 90 (first movement) Beethoven 

Moment Musical Schubert 

La Fileuse Raff 

Callirhoe (Air de Ballet) Chaminacle 



Allah Chaclwick 

My Marguerite Old French Song 

Miss Avent 



Clair De Lune Debussy 

Polichinelle Rachmaninoff 

Polonaise MacDowell 



40 The St. Mary's Muse 



May 1— The Junior-Senior Banquet 

The Muse Room on Saturday evening, May 1st, was the scene of 
that most delightful party of the year, at least in the estimation of 
the Seniors — the "Junior-Senior Banquet." For years these "Ban- 



April 29— Millicent Blanton's Expression Recital 

The third and last of the Certificate Eecitals was given in the 
Auditorium on Thursday evening, April 29th, by Millicent Blanton, 
pupil of Miss Florence C. Davis. Expression recitals are rather a 
rare treat, and since Miss Blanton's first appearance in "A Bachelor's 
Ptomance" three years ago, hers had been eagerly awaited. It was 
no disappointment. A charming figure in her white taffeta gown 
against the green background brightened by innumerable baskets of 
roses, she delivered her selections with that pleasing naturalness of 
manner which had so often delighted her audiences in the past. She 
was obliged to give encores to all three of her numbers, "The High- 
wayman" receiving especially vigorous applause. "The Maker of 
Dreams" was her longest and most difficult number, and the three 
characters in the playlet she portrayed with rare interpretative skill. 

She was assisted by Nancy Lay, and in the final encore they 
appeared together, Miss Blanton reciting to Miss Lay's accompani- 
ment. The program was as follows : 

I 

(a) Tewkesbury Road j hn Masefleld 

(6) Comfort Robert W. Service 

(c) The Highwayman Alfred Noyes 

II 

The Maker of Dreams 

A Fantasy in One Act Oliphant Down 

III 

Moment Musical Schubert 

Polonaise MacDowell 

Miss Nancy Lay 

IV 
The Americanizing of Andre Francois Stella W. Herro.; 



The St. Mary's Muse 41 

quets" have been held annually, and each Junior Class vies with its 
predecessors in the beauty of the decorations, the originality of the 
entertainment, and the general excellency of the menu. The yearly 
attendants of the Junior-Senior Banquet have had to admit that the 
Class of '21 took a place in the front ranks in all three of these 
particulars. The decorations were carried out in green and white, 
the 1920 Class Colors, and the fresh green vines against the snowy 
table cloth made a most attractive scene as the guests entered and 
'.took their places around the tables arranged in the old Roman fashion. 
|A.t one end of the rom was a slightly raised platform, and from this 
eminence Betty Bonner spoke the "word of welcome." 

The ice thus broken, the guests turned their attention to the dainty 
fruit cocktail before them. When this course had been deftly re- 
moved by the green-and- white-clad waitresses. Caroline Moore, Eliza- 
beth ISTolan, Susanne Pegues and Maurine Moore, again the eyes 
of all were drawn to the platform, and this time Fielding Douthat 
delivered a clever little monologue recalling the Senior Hall Burglar 
episode. So the Banquet proceeded, the courses interrupted by some 
little reminiscence of the School Year. The next was a gathering of 
Seniors, (supposedly), admiring their graduation gifts, and leading 
up to Estelle Avent's singing "Perfect Posture," an amusing parody 
on "His Attitude" from "The Pinafore." After the last course 
Katherine "Waddell appeared in cap and gown, with a huge suitcase, 
from which she produced miniature suitcases for the Seniors, "to be 
used not only in going away, but in coming back to visit," and on 
opening them they were found to contain several souvenirs of the 
year — a much-needed key to Senior Hall, a tiny Chapel Cap and pair 
of spats ! 

Dorothy Kirtland, the President of the Junior Class, then spoke 
a few words in eulogy of the Senior Class and the pleasure her class- 
mates had in entertaining them, to which Nancy Lay, the Senior 
President, replied in kind. The other Classes expressed their good 
wishes for the Seniors through their Presidents, and just then the 
orchestra which had provided music throughout the evening softened 
into "Home Sweet Home," and the Banquet was over. All that re- 



42 The St. Maky's Muse 

mained was for the Seniors to assure their hostesses that they had 
never seen a "cuter party" nor had a more "marvelous time," and 
to congratulate Katherine Waddell on the entertainment, Susan Col- 
lier on the menu, and Dorothy Kirtland on the success of the whole. 



Items of Interest 

On Thursday afternoon, April 1st, Mrs. Way took a group of rep- 
resentatives of the Mission Study Classes to the final union meeting 
of all the Lenten Classes, held in the Governor's Mansion. There was 
an interesting program, in which several of the St. Mary's girls took 
part. 

The last of the Winter Concert Series was held in the City Audi- 
torium Wednesday evening, April 7th. The Ganz-Lazzari Concert 
was well attended by St. Mary's girls, as all the others had been, and 
was equally enjoyed. 

Mr. Jones managed to secure the well-known American pianist, 
John Powell, for the 1920 Peace-St. Mary's Concert Series, and his 
Eecital, given in the St. Mary's Auditorium on Saturday evening, 
April 17th, was a great success, despite the fact that the pianist was 
feeling far from well. 

Mrs. Way entertained the Seniors after Nancy Lay's Recital at 
an informal reception. The green and white color scheme, in honor 
of the guests, was prettily carried out, even to the cake icing. 

On Thursday evening, April 29th, Mrs. Josephus Daniels ad- 
dressed the School assembled in the School room. 



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and SODA FOUNTAIN 

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Advertisements 



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Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dr 
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Steel Die and Copper Plate Engrareri 




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Advertisements 



THE FASHION 

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The college girls' store for Snappy, Classy, 
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TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT TO COLLEGE 
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Fire Insurance 






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Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

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C. D. ARTHUR City Market 

FISH AND OYSTERS 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
College Pennants, Pillows, Piotubes, 
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ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 



Advertisements 



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I 



Baletgf), J2. C. 



Commencement Jluntiier 

iWap 1920 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

The 1920 Commencement: 

The Commencement Program 4 

The Dramatic Club Play 4 

The Commencement Sermon 5 

Class Day Exercises g 

The Alumnae Meeting 9 

Report of the Alumnae Treasurer 9 

The Art Exhibit 10 

The Annual Concert 10 

The Rector's Reception 12 

Commencement Day Exercises 12 

The 1920 Commencement Awards 15 

The College Honors of 1920: 

The Salutatory Jane _g # Toy 2 o 

The Class Essay Audrey Stone 20 

The Valedictory Mary T. Yellott 29 

The Class Day Exercises: 

History of the Class of 1920 Jane B. Toy 30 

The Class Poem M ary T. Yellott 33 

The Class Prophecy Mary Hoke 34 

Last Will and Testament Margaret Rawlings 38 

Editorial 40 

School News 42 

Advertisements 49 



f The St. Mary's Muse 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 

Vol. XXV May, 1920 Xo. 8 

O God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this 
School with Thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with 
the light of the everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; 
increase in us true religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great 
mercy keep us in the same, blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the 
Son, together, we worship and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 






Almighty Father, whose mercy is over all Thy works, bless, we beseech 
Thee, with Thy providential care St. Mary's School and all schools and col- 
leges of Christian education, and prosper all right efforts for their support. 
Help us in the work being done for the improvement and endowment of this 
School, to pray earnestly, to labor diligently, and to give generously. Grant 
to the teachers and the taught the light of Thy Holy Spirit to lead them into 
all truth and to build them up in Christian Grace and character: for the 
sake of Thy Kingdom and the honor of Thy name, through Jesus Christ, our 
Lord. Amen. 

fl!n)a Mater 

(Tune: "Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms." 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree, 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollection and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. 

H. E. H., 1905. 



The St. Mart's Muse 



THE 1920 COMMENCEMENT 



Trje Con)n)encen)ent Progran) 

Saturday, May 22, 8:15 p.m., Annual Recital of the Elocution Department 

in the Auditorium, "Twelfth Night." 

Sunday, May 23, 7:50 a.m., Celebration of the Holy Communion. 

11:00 a.m., Commencement Sermon in the Chapel, by the 
Rev. Wallace E. Rollins, D.D., Professor at 
the Theological Seminary near Alexandria, 
Va. 
5:00 p.m., Alumnee Service in the Chapel. 

Monday, May 24, 11:00 a.m., Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

4:30 p.m., Annual Alumnae Meeting in the Parlor. 

5:30 p.m., Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the 

Studio. 
8:30 p.m., Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 
9:30 p.m., Rector's Reception in the Parlor. 

Tuesday, May 25, 11:00 a.m., Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. An- 
nual Address by Mr. J. Nelson Frierson, of 
the University of South Carolina. Closing 
Exercises in the Chapel, with address to 
Graduates by Bishop Guerry. 

Saturday 

The Dramatic Club Play 
The Commencement festivities began, as usual, with the Dra- 
matic Clnb Play in the Auditorium on Saturday evening. This year 
Miss Davis returned to her old custom of presenting a Shakesperian 
play at Commencement, and "Twelfth Night" had been selected for 
the occasion. Xo elaborate stage setting was attempted, and none 
was necessary, for the woodsy background, while perhaps a trifle 
incongruous, made a beautiful setting and the Shakesperian costumes 
lent the desired atmosphere. The play is a difficult one, but was 
marked throughout by intelligent and spirited action, and bore wit- 
ness to the skillful training of the director, Miss Florence C. Davis. 
The parts had been happily assigned, but perhaps none more so than 
in giving the inimitable Sir Toby to Lorraine Smythe, who kept the 






The St. Mary's Muse 



house in such gales of merriment that it is to be feared the audience 
was sometimes laughing at, rather than with, the rascally joker. 
The News and Observer handed the bouquets to Millicent Blanton, 
who took the part of Viola with singular charm, and whose acting, 
according to the paper, "showed considerable finish' '■ — finish, in more 
ways than one, for this play marked the last of Miss Blanton's appear- 
ances on the St. Mary's stage, where, during her three years, she has 
taken a prominent part in every play presented. Fielding Douthat, 
playing the part of Viola's twin, Sebastian, did excellent work, and 
bids fair to be the dramatic star next year. The work of Dorothy 
Kirtland as Maria, the witty waiting maid, also deserves mention. 

The Auditorium was crowded with town people and visiting rela- 
tives, and the play was received with great enthusiasm. 

The cast of characters was as follows : 

Orsino, Duke of Illyria Jane Toy 

Sebastian, brother to Viola Fielding Douthat 

Antonio, a sea captain, friend to Sebastian Audrey Stone 

A Sea Captain, friend to Viola Miriam Silversteen 

Valentine, gentleman attending on the Duke Mary Louise Everett 

Sir Toby Belch, uncle to Olivia f Lorraine Smythe 

Sir Andrew Aguecheek Katherine Batts 

Malvolio, steward to Olivia ,g ara Davis 

Friar Catherine Boyd 

Feste, a clown, servant to Olivia Mary Yellott 

An Officer Nina Cooper 

Olivia, a lady of fortune Betty Bonner 

Viol f Millicent Blanton 

Maria, Olivia's waiting woman Dorothy Kirtland 

Sunday 

Commencement Sunday was appropriately ushered in with an 
early celebration of the Holy Communion. The eleven o'clock serv- 
ice was marked by the sermon of the Eev. Wallace E. Rollins, D.D., 
of the Virginia Theological Seminary. Dr. Rollins took no text, 
but announced as his subject, "The Verbs of the Moral Life." These 
lie enumerated in their relative order, "I am, I ought, I can, I will, 
I must," and proceeded to take up each one in its turn, showing its 
importance and significance in the moral life. 



The St. Mart's Muse 



"The development of your personality, which is the most wonderful 
and most mysterious thing in the world, and which is a gift of God 
that makes it possible to have fellowship and to distinguish between 
the ideal and the actual, should be your first consideration as you enter 
into this new experience of life," said Dr. Rollins. It was a very 
timely address, well constructed and easy to follow, and the twenty- 
five graduates will long remember Dr. Rollins' five "verbs of the 
moral life." 

At the afternoon service at five o'clock, which is known as the 
Alumna? Service, the Rector addressed himself particularly to the 
visiting Alunmse, extending to them the cordial welcome with which 
St. Mary's always greets her daughters when they return. 

The special feature of Sunday evening was the union Muse meet- 
ing of the present Muse Club and the members of the Class of 1910, 
which held a reunion at the School during the Commencement season. 

After lights, the Seniors serenaded, assisted by Ellen Lay and 
Elizabeth Waddell, the only members of last year's class back for 
Commencement, and when the old familiar sound of "Waddy's 
yodel" was heard, many were the eyes dimmed by tears called forth 
by memories, bitter-sweet, and so affected were the Seniors that they 
found considerable difficulty in joining in the following chorus, "If 
You'll Be M-i-n-e, Mine!" After singing the songs of the Class of 
1910 beneath the windows of the Infirmary, where the "Reunionists" 
were sleeping ( ?), even the Seniors retired at length, and peace settled 
down upon the School for a few hours. 

Mor)day 

Peace indeed for a few hours, but only a very few, for Monday 
morning the Juniors were up at four o'clock, according to the time- 
honored custom, working on the Daisy Chain. Poor Juniors, there 
was more truth than poetry (with no insinuations against the poet!) 
in their lament at the "Junior-Senior Banquet" : 

Seniors, why weren't you brilliant 

With forethought and fertile brain? 
Why did not you think to pickle 

For us poor Juniors that Daisy Chain? 



The St. Mary's Muse 



For it would, under any circumstances, have been a problem to 
find sufficient daisies for twenty-five yards of chain, but due to the 
unusually late spring this year, it seemed well nigh impossible to 
the six desperate Juniors. Necessity, however, here again proved 
herself the mother of invention, and the Juniors were given an excel- 
lent opportunity to display their ingenuity. 

By breakfast time Monday morning, the required twenty-five 
yards of "daisy chain" were completed, and if the chain did not 
exactly resemble past daisy chains, some reason for the difference 
may be found in the fact that this particular one was made largely of 
hedge and spirea, with just enough daisies scattered through it to give 
the "proper spirit." The Juniors and their Sophomore assistants 
were justly proud of their work, and the Seniors, recalling their own 
Junior days, were sufficiently appreciative to satisfy the most 



demanding. 



Monday morning was a busy time for all, the Juniors engaged in 
arranging for the Class Day Exercises in the Grove, and casting now 
and then an apprehensive eye in the direction of a particularly dark 
cloud which threatened momentarily to blot out the struggling sun. 
Great was the excitement when, at a rate of speed permitted only to 
fire engines in case of emergency, the Edwards & Broughton truck 
tore through the Grove and delivered the Annual Muse into the arms 
of the frantic editor. From that moment all went well. 

At eleven o'clock the Class Day procession appeared from behind 
West Eock, and, led by their Marshals to their respective places, the 
classes marched into the circle prepared for them, surrounded by an 
admiring throng of friends and relatives. Last of all came' the 
Seniors, led from East Bock by Frances Venable, the Chief Marshal, 
and tenderly carrying the precious daisy chain, which, when they 
reached the chairs reserved for them, they laid gently on the ground 
at their feet. 

Nancy Lay, Bresident of the Senior Class, presided at the exercises, 
and, in the name of her class, extended a welcome to the assembled 
guests. The Secretary, Batty Sherrod, then read the final roll-call 
with impressive solemnity, which was followed by the singing of the 
class songs in order, as at the School Barry. Jane Toy read the 



The St. Mary's Muse 



History of the Class of 1920 through its checkered school career; the 
Class Poem was read by Mary Yellott, and a very clever and amusing 
Prophecy by Mary Hoke. The Seniors then sang, "Good-bye, 1920," 
and their Last "Will and Testament was read by Margaret Eawlings. 
Xext came the awarding of the athletic banner, which was won this 
year by the Sigma Athletic Association, and was presented to Mary 
Hoke, President of the Sigmas, by Rainsford Glass, President of the 
Mus. The score for the year was 67 to 66, from which it may be 
gathered that the fight for the banner was a hard-fought battle, and 
the Sigmas are to be congratulated for their well earned victory. 
The final score of the literary societies was in favor of the Epsilon 
Alpha Pi, which was credited with 62^ points against 22% for the 
Sigma Lambda. The prizes in the literary contest were announced 
as follows : best story, Crichton Thorne, Sigma Lambda ; best sketch, 
Jane Toy, E A n ; best essay, Eleanor Sublett, E A n ; best poem, 
Mary T. Yellott, E A n. 

Miss Yellott, the editor-in-chief, then read the dedication of the 
annual Muse to Mrs. Caroline V. Perkins, and gift copies of The 
Muse were presented to the Bishop, the Rector, the Commencement 
speakers, and others, whom the Class of 1920 wished to honor witl 
this mark of their esteem. 



Greetings from the Class of 1910 were extended the Seniors h; 
Miss Eebe Shields, of Scotland Xeck, who announced that her class 
would honor the School by the giving of a scholarship. Miss La] 
responded for the Seniors and stated that her class would also give 
a scholarship of $100 as a gift to the School. After the Seniors ha( 
sung, "Good-bye, School," the exercises were closed with the singing 
of "Alma Mater." Then there was a mad rush for East Rock, anc 
for the next fifteen minutes a long white line of girls might be seen, 
impatiently awaiting their turn at the postofnce window where the 
annuals were being given out. 

The class exercises in full, being of special interest to the present 
day St. Mary's girls, are given at length further over in this Musi 

The members of the Class of 1910 held their reunion luncheon at 
the Woman's Club at 1 p. m., over half of the class being present foi 
the delightful occasion. 



The St. Mart's Muse 



The Alumnae Meeting 

The annual meeting of the St. Mary's Alumnse Association was 
held in the parlor at -A: 30, with about fifty present, including a large 
number of out-of-town Alumna?. Mrs. T. M. Ashe, Vice-President 
of the Association, presided in the absence of Mrs. T. W. Bickett, 
the President. In the election of officers, Miss Rebecca Hill Shields, of 
Scotland aSTeck, was named President for the coming year, and Miss 
Susan Marshall, of Raleigh, Vice-President. The other officers were 
reelected. Interesting talks were made by the Rector and Mr. W. H. 
Jones, Director of Music. Final arrangements were made for the 
unveiling of the Iredell Memorial Window on All Saints' Day, and 
the matter of a new organ, which as Mr. Jones pointed out is 
seriously needed both for purposes of worship and instruction, was 
discussed. Mrs. W. W. Vass was made chairman of a committee to 
interest the various chapters in securing a suitable front entrance to 
St. Mary's. Two new members of the Alumna? Council were elected 
for a term of three years each, being Miss Annie Cameron, of Hills- 
boro, and Mrs. Jane Withers, of Raleigh. Members of the Class of 
1910 attended the meeting and were welcomed by Miss Katie. The 
newest Alumna? were welcomed by Mrs. W. A. Montgomery, and Miss 
Lay responded. 

The Annual Report of the Alumnae Treasurer 

Receipts 

Brought forward $ 229.63 

Interest on Bonds 300.00 

Interest on Liberty Bonds 12.75 

Interest on Bank Account 8.72 

Dues, Gen. Asso 3.00 

Balance Chapel Hill Chapter, 1919 1.00 

Dues Chapel Hill Chapter, 1920 8.00 

Dues Raleigh Chapter, 1920 36.00 

Returned by A. Cameron, Expense Account .55 



Total $ 599.65 

Expenditures 

To Miss McKimmon (interest on Bonds) $ 300.00 

Balance in Bank to date, May 24 299.65 

Total $ 599.65 



10 The St. Mary's Muse 



Total Resources 

In 6 per cent Bonds $5 ooo.OO 

In Liberty Bonds 3 qq 

Cash in Bank „ 29965 



Total $5,599.65 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. Cruikshank, Treasurer. 

The Art Exhibit 

The Animal Art Exhibit was unusually attractive this year, show- 
ing splendid work and careful training. The pupils in the First 
Year Course had a good showing, especially in original design. 
Course B, the Second Year work, was strong in Cast Drawing and 
original posters for Commercial Art, the most striking among which 
were Southern Pines, by Callie Mae Eoberson ; The Horse Show, by 
Jane Euffin ; Vantines, by Josephine Kose, and Keith's Vaudeville, 
by Nancy Lay. 

The special work in water color by Carmen Jones and special work 
in oils by Mary Fetter deserve mention. 

The three certificate girls showed excellent work in a variety of 
subjects. Snow Balls and an Interior, by Jane Eufim ; Wistaria and 
an Interior, by Dorothy Kirtland, and Bananas and Roses, by Nancy 
Lay stood out most prominently in their exhibits. 

Some of the up-to-date features were the candle shades and lamp 
shades with original designs. A lamp shade with nasturtium design 
by Josephine Forbes and one by Alice Cheek, also a pair of candle 
shades by Eva Lee Glass, were conspicuous. 

A Coat of Arms by Alice Cheek was quite well done. Altogether 
it was an excellent exhibition of the year's work in the studio, and 
reflects great credit on both pupils and teacher. 

The flooual Corjcert 

The annual concert was given in the Auditorium at 8:30 p. m., 
and the rather elaborate program was thoroughly enjoyed by a very 
large audience. The young musicians all played and sang well, but 
special mention should be made of Margaret Elliott, who played 



The St. Mart's Muse 11 



a beautiful violin solo, "Reverie," and later took part in a string 
quartette. Louise Egleston handled two difficult piano selections 
with ease and skill, and Estelle A vent revealed a voice pure, flexible 
and brilliant in her soprano solo, "Una Voce." The Part-Song, 
"The Song of the Bells," which concluded the program, was a beauti- 
ful and fitting climax, and the guests then dispersed, some to view 
the Art Exhibit, others proceeded at once to the Rector's Reception. 

The program follows : , 

Part One 

Piano Duet: "Malaguena" ("Boabdil") Moszkowski 

Misses Edith Hutson and Mary Hoke 

Piano Solo : Drifting Friml 

Miss Emily Hart 

Violin Solo: Reverie Vieuxtemps 

Miss Margaret Elliott 

Piano Solo : a. March Wind MacDowell 

b. Serenade Sinding 

Miss Louise Egleston 

Contralto Solo: A Summer Night Goring-Thomas 

Miss Elizabeth Sabiston 

Piano Solo : Bolero Lack 

Miss Bessie Brown 

Part Two 

Soprano Solo: Berceuse ("Jocelyn") Godard 

Miss Gladys Williamson 
Cello obligato: Miss Mary Ray 

Piano Solo : Autumn Chaminade 

Miss Vannie Drew 

String Quartette: Andante Cantabile . Tschaikowsky 

First Violin, Miss Bessie Ray; Second Violin, Miss Margaret Elliott 
Viola, Mr. Gustav Hagedorn; Cello, Miss Mary Ray 

Soprano Solo: Una Voce ("Barber of Seville") Rossini 

Miss Estelle Avent 

Piano Solo : Polonaise MacDowell 

Miss Nancy Lay 

Part-Song: The Song of the Bells Coombs 

Incidental Solo: Miss Grace Franklin 

First Soprano: Misses Avent, Travis, Speed and Hagan 
Second Soprano: Misses Stone, Hannah, Brown and Rhea 
Alto: Misses Franklin, Lay, Sabiston and Hutson 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 



Tf)e Rector's Receptioo 

Immediately after the annual concert, the Rector's reception was 
held in the parlor. The faculty and guests, including the parents, 
relatives and friends of the graduating class, and the old girls, who 
were back, were welcomed by Mr. and Mrs. Way, Bishop "and Mrs. 
Cheshire, Mrs. Perkins, Miss Katie, and the twenty-five graduates. 
It was a receiving line of formidable length, but the Seniors, in their 
evening gowns and rather resembling a garden of roses, proved such 
an attraction that more than once the line was blocked, and the gentle- 
men guests had to be prodded from behind by a reproving finger to 
start things moving again. The Juniors served ice cream and cake, 
and a thoroughly delightful evening was enjoyed by all who were 
present. 

Tuesday 

Trje Cori)menceroent Day Exercises 

Commencement morning dawned dark and cloudy, but the day 
was brightened by the two hundred white-clad girls who thronged 
the Grove until the bell called them to the final assembly of the 
year. From the school room they marched to the Auditorium, and 
when they were seated and the trustees had taken their places on 
the stage, the twenty-five graduates were led on by the Chief Marshal, 
Frances Venable. There the following program was presented : 

Sextette (with soprano obligate) : Chanson Provencale Del' Aqua 

Soprano Solo, Audrey Stone 

First Soprano: Estelle Avent and Mary Ellen Travis 

Second Soprano: Bessie Brown and Edith Hutson 

Alto: Nancy Lay and Mary Yellott 

Salutatory Jane Toy 

Class Essay: "Folk Songs of the Carolina Mountains" Audrey Stone 

Address j. Nelson Frierson, Esq. 

Piano Duet: "Wedding Procession" Hoffmann 

Margaret Elliott and Elizabeth Nolan 

Valedictory Mary Yellott 

Announcement of Honors 

Presentation of Diplomas, Certificates, and Distinctions 



The St. Mary's Muse 13 



Professor J. Nelson Frierson, of the Law Department of the 
University of South Carolina, was introduced as the animal speaker 
by the Rector. He enlisted the interest of all at the very start, 
especially the feminine majority present, when he announced his 
subject as: "Eights and Obligations of Women in the World of 
Today." 

The News and Observer had to say of Prof. Friersons address: 
Prof. Frierson stated that he was not appearing as a suffrage advocate, but 
stressed the fact that the education of women should be broadened to enable 
them to meet the more serious duties which they will be called upon to perform 
in the future in the interest of the State and Nation. He began his address 
by stating that up until very recently the law sanctioned the subordination of 
women, and gave examples of this, beginning with the time of St. Paul, who, 
influenced by the teachings as to the position of woman, assigned her to a 
place of silence in the Church. The law of the land was that woman was 
absolutely subservient to her husband. Prof. Frierson then called attention 
to the legal and social status of woman at the time of the Norman conquest. 
The unmarried woman with property, he said, had little or no property 
rights, and in the case of a married woman, everything she possessed in 
reality belonged to her husband. 

The French Revolution, stated the speaker, was one event which put 
women forward as to further rights, and the Abolitionist movement in 
America had a somewhat similar effect, calling, as it did, for the equality of 
mankind. John Stuart Mill was in advance of his time on the proposition 
of giving women more rights. He introduced a bill in the English parlia- 
ment providing that women be given the vote. He wrote that most of the 
male sex were slaves and that all the female sex were slaves. Mill said that 
the ballot was essential for women to protect themselves, as no class of 
persons ever got their rights and privileges unless they had the power of 
enforcing them. The speaker told of the suffrage fight in England just prior 
to the outbreak of the war. "Suffrage advocates then made vicious attacks 
on English statesmen in an effort to have them grant them the ballot, but 
when the war came the noise of battle was silenced and both sides united to 
fight the common foe on the battlefields. So well did woman do her work 
during the war that when the struggle ended her request for the ballot met 
little opposition and she was granted the voting privilege. 

"The movement for further rights for women is world-wide. Are we going 
to try to turn back the mighty tide that is coming on or bow to the inevitable 
and make the adjustment demanded? Right now women are working in the 
commercial and industrial world, and most of them have to work because 
they have to eat. It is for these that protection is demanded and the ballot 
is a necessary step for rights more broad and liberal than before. 

"Legislation is the only means of social reforms. In Australia, where the 
women have long had the right to vote, great prominence has been given to 






14 The St. Mart's Muse 

social and domestic legislation. The needs of the home, the school and the 
social order have gotten a better showing and received more legislative 
attention. 

"It is incumbent upon you young women," Prof. Frierson concluded, "to 
pay more attention to the serious side of education rather than to the frills. 
I do not say that music and art should be stopped, nor that the cultural 
branches of education are not necessary, but the educational system for 
women should be shaped to give them a broader view of their responsibility 
in life and ability to exercise greater power. A greater measure of self- 
reliance must be instilled in them, so that they can take their proper places 
in the new social order." 

Following a piano duet by Margaret Elliott and Elizabeth Nolan 
the Valedictory was delivered by Mary Yellott, and the Rector con- 
cluded the exercises in the Auditorium by announcing the honors and 
presenting the certificates and distinctions. The remainder of the 
exercises took place in the chapel, the march from the Auditorium to 
the chapel being one of the most impressive scenes of the Commence- 
ment season. The order of service in the chapel was as follows : 

Processional Hymn, No. 396: "Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand" 

Scripture Lesson 

Benedictus 

Creed 

Prayers 

Hymn No. 311: "Ancient of Days" 

Presentation of Diplomas 

Address to Graduates 

Prayers and Benediction 

Recessional Hymn: "Jerusalem, High Tower" 

The service was attended by three bishops, Bishop Cheshire, Bishop 
Guerry and Bishop Darst. Other clergy in the chancel were : Rev. 
A. B. Hunter, Rev. Milton A. Barber, Rev. T. T. Walsh, and Rev. 
F. P. Lobdell. The scripture lesson was read by Bishop Cheshire, 
who also presented the diplomas, and the address to the graduates 
was made by Bishop William A. Guerry, of Charleston, S. C. Bishop 
Guerry urged the young ladies to go out into the world and represent 
the truth, to be patriots of intellectual and moral liberty. He callec 
attention to the present time of crisis in the Nation and in the world, 
and said the principles of right must be applied to the problems con- 



The St. Mary's Muse 



15 



fronting the country. He said there was never so great a necessity 
for right thinking, and urged the graduates to use their brains with 
understanding. 

After the benediction had been pronounced by Bishop Cheshire, 
the familiar notes of "Jerusalem, High Tower" pealed forth, and one 
more class of graduates passed from the shadow of the little chapel, 
singing the same triumphant words which had been on the lips of so 
many graduates before them. After the clergy and trustees had 
walked past the long white line of tearful girls, extending almost 
from one Kock to the other, the Chief Marshall, standing beneath the 
rose arch, raised her hand, and with the traditional "School is dis- 
missed," she ended at once the Commencement Exercises and the 
School Tear, 1920. 

The 1920 CororoencemeQt Awards 

Class Promotions, 1920 

To be Seniors: 



Elizabeth Bowen Bonner 

Elizabeth Hill Carrigan 

Susan Moore Collier 

May Deaton 

Fielding Lewis Douthat 

Nancy Hart 

Virginia Lanier Jordan 

Florida Freeman Kent 

Dorothy Florence Kirtland 



Mabel Merritt 
Caroline Brevard Moore 
Elizabeth Nelson 
Mary Elizabeth Nolan 
Suzanne Payne Pegues 
Sarah Eleanor Tiplady 
Frances Preston Venable 
Katherine Mason Waddell 



To be Juniors 



Evelina Gilbert Beckwith 
Rebecca Hastings Cole 
Muriel Dougherty 
Marietta Cobb Gareissen 
Rebecca Elizabeth Hines 
Margaret Strange Huske 
Mary Lybrook Lasater 
Henrietta Estelle Long 



Maurine Moore 
Jane Dickinson MacMillan 
Lenore Christine Powell 
Louise Henrietta Powell 
Mary Evelyn Thacker 
Frances Moring Williams 
Mary Wiatt Yarborough 



16 



The St. Mary's Muse 



To he Sophomores: 

Julia Winston Ashworth 
Estelle Brown Avent 
Betsey Ballou 
Dorothy Berrien Baum 
Bessie Brown 
Helen Porter Budge 
Carroll Moore Cave 
Caroline Dargan 
Louise Aiken Egleston 
Margaret Blow Elliott 
Mary Louise Everett 
Josephine Lewis Forbes 
Mary Page Franklin 
Jean Cameron Gales 
Eva Lee Glass 
Emily Elizabeth Hart 
Edith Genevieve Hutson 
Elizabeth Lewis Lawrence 



Hallie Augusta Lenoir 
Mary Strange Morgan 
Frances Holt Mountcastle 
Mabel Norfleet 
Beatrice Josephine Parker 
Helen Elizabeth Roberson 
Josephine Mann Rose 
Lena Evelyn Simmons 
Ruth Doris Swett 
Katherine Taber 
Idie Kerr Taylor 
Susie Hill Taylor 
Mary Elizabeth Thomas 
Minette Gordon Thompson 
Elizabeth Gordon Tucker 
Hilda Grace Turrentine 
Evelyn Lee Way 
Marjorie Willard 



To he Freshmen: 



Dorothy Dodd 

Martha Carolina Gresham 



Helen Bond Webb 



The Honor Roll 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members of the 
School, is the Honor Roll, announced at Commencement. The re- 
quirements are : 

(1) The student must have been in attendance the entire session and have 
been absent from no duty at any time during the session without the full 
consent of the Rector, and without lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular course of study or 
its equivalent, and must have carried this work to successful completion, 
taking all required examinations and obtaining a mark for the year in each 
subject of at least 75 per cent 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good" (90 per cent), or 
better, in her studies 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" (less than two demerits) 
in Deportment, in Industry, and in Punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory bearing in the 
affairs of her school life during the year. 



The St. Mary's Muse 17 



The Eoll of Honoe of 1919-20 

1. Mary Traill Yellott, '20 95.0 

2. Josephine Lewis Forbes, "23 93,6 

3. Mary Josephine Josey, Bus 93,2 

4. Sue Byrne Hutchinson, '24 93.0 

5. Evelyn Lee Way, '24 92.8 

6. Jane Bingham Toy, '20 92.8 

7. Marietta Cobb Gareissen, '22 92.5 

8. Louise Egleston, '23 92.1 

9. Katherine Taber, '23 92.0 

10. Elizabeth Lee Hale, Bus 91.6 

11. Mary Strange Morgan, '23 91. 3 

12. Katharine Galloway B'atts, '20 91. 3 

13. Rainsford Fairbanks Glass, '20 91. 

14. Elizabeth Lewis Lawrence, '23 90.8 

15. Mary McBee Hoke, '20 90. 7 

16. Crichton Alston Thorne, '23 90. 5 

17. Lola Mclntyre Walton, Bus 90.5 

18. Mabel Norfleet, '23 90. 4 

19. May Deaton, '22 90. 1 

The Niles Medal 

The Mies Medal for Highest Average was instituted by Eev. 
Charles Martin Niles, D.D. ; in 1906. It is awarded to the student 
who has made the best record in scholarship during the session. 

The requirements are : 

(1) The student must have taken throughout the year at least "15 points" 
of regular work; and have satisfactorily completed this work, passing all 
required examinations. 

(2) She must have been "Excellent" in Deportment. 

(3) She must have taken all regular general courses assigned and have 
done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) She must be a regular student of the College Department. 

In accordance with these conditions this fifteenth award of the 
jSTiles Medal is made to 

Miss Maey Teaill Yellott, of the Sexioe Class 

whose home is Bel Air, Md. ; and whose average for the year is 95.0 
per cent. 



18 The St. Mart's Muse 



Comroenceroent Awards 

In the Business Department 

Full Certificates 

Elizabeth Hale Halifax, N. C. 

Sara Irvin Reidsville, N. C. 

Charlotte Johnson Raleigh, N. C. 

Crichton Thorne Warrenton, N. C. 

Lola Walton Morganton, N. C. 

Certificates in Stenography and Typewriting 

Grace Barbour Irene Grirusley Mary Josey 

Katherine Batts Nancy Hart Jessie Keith 

Rebecca Cole Virginia Herrick Hester Lilly 

Mildred Dawson Elizabeth Horton Adelaide Smith 

Virginia Flora Evelyn Hughes Lorraine Smythe 

Certificate in Typewriting and Bookkeeping 
Mary McCabe 

Certificates in Typewriting 

Eunice Collier Elizabeth Cross Lucia Nottingham 

Susan Collier Frances Higgs Patty Sherrod 

Certificate in Bookkeeping 
Iva McAulay 

In the Home Economics Department 

Full Certificate 

Annie Geneva Higgs Greenville, N. C. 

Certificate in Domestic Science 
Caroline Dargan Raleigh, N. C. 

In the Art Department 

Certificates 

Dorothy Kirtland St. Augustine, Fla. 

Anna Rogers Lay Beaufort, N. C. 

Jane Reynolds Ruffln Mayodan, N. C. 

In the Elocution Department 

Certificate 
Millicent Frances Blanton Shelby, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse 19 



In the Music Department 

Certificate in Piano 
Anna Rogers Lay Beaufort, N. C. 

Certificate in Voice 
Estelle Brown Avent Rocky Mount, N. C. 

THE GRADUATES 

The Class of 1920 

Lucy London Anderson Payetteville, N. C'.. 

Katherine Galloway Batts Tarboro, N. C. 

Millicent Frances Blanton Shelby, N. C. 

Catharine Cole Boyd New Bern, N. C. 

Alice Mutter Cheek Henderson, N. C. 

Nina Horner Cooper Oxford, N. C. 

Sara Lorton Davis Seneca, S. C. 

Annie Virginia Duncan Beaufort, N, C. 

Rainsford Fairbanks Glass Orlando, Fla. 

Annie Geneva Higgs Greenville, N. C. 

Mary McBee Hoke Raleigh, N. C. 

Anna Rogers Lay Beaufort, N. C. 

Catherine Margaret Miller Henderson, N. C. 

Pauline Miller Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Myrtie Moffitt Asheboro, N. C. 

Margaret Muse Rawlings "Wilson, N. C. 

Jane Reynolds Ruffin Mayodan, N. C. 

Pattie Sherrod Hamilton, N. C. 

Adelaide Evans Smith Charlotte, N. C 

Audrey Gray Stone Thomasville, N. C. 

Judith Eleanor Sublett Harrisonburg, Va. 

Eugenia Agnes Thomas Savannah, Ga. 

Jane Bingham Toy (Second Honor) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Ruth Womble Raleigb, N. C. 

Mary Traill Yellott (First Honor) Bel Air, Md. 



20 The St. Mart's Muse 



THE COLLEGE HONORS OF 1920 

The Salutatory 

Jane B. Toy 
It is a great pleasure that is mine today in welcoming you, on 
behalf of the Class of 1920, to these our Commencement Exercises. 
This is an event to which we have looked forward for four long years 
and we wish to share with you the happiness of the day. We are 
glad to have with us our good friend, Bishop Cheshire, the Trustees, 
our Eector, the Faculty, and all our friends, especially the Old 
Girls, who are back with us today. To each and all, the Class of 1920 
extends a hearty welcome. 

The Class Essay 

FOLKSONGS OF THE NoBTH CaBOLINA MoUXTAIA t S 

Audeet Stone 

"Jolly is the miller who lives by the mill, 
The wheel goes round with a right good will; 
One hand in the hopper and one in the sack, 
Girls step forward and boys step back." 

High above from the depths of the woods came the first faint voice 
of the summer morn. Half awake, I listened to my dream melody. 
And then, as the peculiar strain, this time stronger, again floated 
into my cabin window, I roused with a start to the realization that the 
singing was real and not a fantasy. Stronger and louder grew the 
carols. The very air seemed to throb with song. The singing of the 
first faint voice had proved as infectious as the morning prayer of the 

Arab that passes from tower to tower. It came from everywhere 

from the woodsmen down in the hollow, from the lads at the milking 
gap, from the birds in the trees, and from the little children of the 
white people who live on the hilltops. All the mountainside seemed 
to be singing. It made me want to sing too. And that is the magic 
and the charm of the "Highlands of North Carolina." 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 



The towering mountains with their softly rounded contours and 
glorious wooded heights are dreams of beauty. The setting could 
not be more ideally romantic for a fanciful people. Everything 
tends to lend itself to the carefree musical atmosphere. The voices 
of the boys and girls are always soft and melodious, and even the 
land cock crows with a rhythmical southern accent. And the primi- 
tive inhabitants of this enchanted world live with a song on their 
lips from morn till eve. They are uncultured, untutored— often 
they cannot even read. But not knowing that anything is lacking 
they laugh and take life as they find it. Their hearts are glad 
always. And to sing is the one way they know to express their 
happiness. 

The two songs, "Fair Ellendu" and "Fair Ellen and Sweet Wil- 
liam" have practically the same text. Both are more recent ver- 
sions of "Earl Brand," a ballad clear to the hearts of both the English 
and Scotch. It is a very ancient story, closely related to an old 
Scandinavian ballad of like theme and perhaps itself of Scandinavian 
origin. At least all indications tend to show that this song belongs 
to the interesting Hildegasa group. Another song which the Blue 
Eidge backswoodsmen are very fond of singing is one entitled, 
"The Three Crows." A careful comparison will show that this is 
a counterpart of the favored English ballad, "The Three Ravens," 
which was first printed in Melismata in 1611. "Lady Isabel and 
the Elf Knight," which seems to have attained the widest circulation 
of all folk songs throughout the world, has found its way into the 
mountains of North Carolina under three different titles. In one 
section we find the mountaineer singing his beloved "Sweet William," 
in another "The Seventh King's Daughter" is often heard, while in 
a third we find the same story chanted in the song, "The Six Fair 
Maids." 

The last of these ancient ballads, "The Wife of Usher's Well," 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 

which was first discovered among the "poor whites" in the mountains 
of Polk County, North Carolina, needs no introduction to us : 
There was a lady fair and gay, 
And children she had three; 
She sent them away to some northern land 
For to learn their grammeree. 

They hadn't been gone but a very short time, 

About three months to a day, 
When sickness came to that land 

And swept those babes away. 

There is a king in the heavens above 

That wears a golden crown; 
She prayed that he would send her babies home, 

Tonight or in the morning soon. 

It was about one Christmas time, 

When the nights was long and cool, 
She dreamed of her three little lonely babes 

Come running in their mother's room. 

The table was fixed and the cloth was spread, 

And on it put bread and wine; 
"Come sit you down, my three little babes, 

And eat and drink of mine." 

'We will neither eat your bread, dear mother, 

Nor we'll neither drink your wine, 
For to our Saviour we must return 

Tonight or in the morning soon." 

The bed was fixed in the back room, 

On it was some clean white sheets, 
And on the top was a golden cloth 

To make those little babes sleep. 

"Wake up! wake up!" says the oldest one; 

"Wake up! its almost day, 
And to our Saviour we must return, 

Tonight or in the morning." 

"Green grass grows at our head, dear mother, 

Green moss grows at our feet; 
The tears that you shed for us three babes 

Won't wet our winding sheet." 









The St. Maky's Muse 23 



Another class of native songs which must not be overlooked are the 
frontier ballads of 1849, many of which have drifted back from the 
plains and are to be found in the mountains of the Asheville district. 
These are particularly weird and unsuallv effective when suna 1 with 
the correct accent and pauses by the backwoodsmen to the accompani- 
ment of his guitar. Three such songs are u The Buffalo Skinners." 
"The Cowboy's Lament/' and "The Dying Cowboy." This last one, 
of which the refrain is given, is perhaps the most well known : 

"It was once in the saddle I used to go dancing, 

It was once in the saddle I used to go gay; 
But then I took to drinking an' then to card playing, 
Got shot by a gambler and now I must die." 

Last of all, there is a group of ballads, perhaps the most interesting 
of all to us because they are true mountain songs — the primitive com- 
positions of our plain mountain folk. As compared with the ballads 
which have found their way over from the old country, they are 
young, but there's never to be found a man, woman, or child who does 
not know them by the score. Some of the favorites are: "Sal's in the 
Garden Siftin' San'," "Owen's Confession," "Sourwood Mountain," 
"Cotton-eyed Joe," "Huckleberry Bush," "Blue-eyed Girl," "Old 
Uncle Joe," "Aunt Sally Goodin'," and "Pretty Sarah." 

"Pretty Sarah, pretty Sarah, pretty Sarah, I know, etc." 

With what pleasant memories I recall this song! It was in the 
cool of the mountain evening when the day's work was clone and all 
cares laid aside. Outside there was moonlight and a gentle breeze 
lightly sighing through the pines; inside all was enchanting dark- 
ness save the log fire in the big fireplace, around which we were seated. 
There were many of us there, for it was the regular night for the 
visit of my host's neighbor and his family. 

In the glare of the burning logs, providing the visitors with enter- 
tainment, sat a red-haired youth with his violin rendering with zest 
the compositions of a local celebrity. In high glee he played and 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 

sang one after another of these until he finally struck the haunting 
melody of "Pretty Sarah" : 

"When I came to this country in 1829, 
I saw many lovers, but I didn't see mine. 

I looked all around me and saw I was alone, 
And me a poor stranger, a long way from home. 

It's not this long journey I'm dreading to go, 

Nor leaving my country, nor the debts that I owe. 

There's nothing to pester, nor trouble my mind, 
Like leaving pretty Sarah, my darling, behind. 

My love she won't have me as I do understand, 
She wants a freeholder and I have no land. 

But I can maintain her with silver and gold, 

And its many pretty things my love's house can hold. 

I wish I was a poet and could write a fine hand, 
I'd write my love a letter that she could understand; 
I'd send it by the waters when the water overflows, 
I think of pretty Sarah, wherever she goes. 

I wish I was a dove, and had wings and could fly, 
About my love's dwelling this night I'd draw nigh, 
And in her lily white arms all night I could lay 
And watch some window for the dawning of the day. 

As pretty Sarah, pretty Sarah, pretty Sarah, I know 
How much I love you, I never can show. 
At the foot of old Coey, on the mountain's sad brow, 
I used to love you dearly and I don't hate you now." 

Their songs are true songs — simple narrative ballads that tell 
a story, based either on an event of legendary or real history, or on 
some happening of ordinary life. Very seldom does one of them 
have an ascertainable date and never a known author. In most cases, 
the song, composed in the popular style of the time, has been handed 
down by oral transmission from generation to generation and has con- 
sequently undergone many changes. 



The St. Mart's Muse 25 



Strong racial characteristics are revealed by the southern moun- 
taineer's songs. They are lively and vivacious strains, coming 
straight from the heart of the folk and revealing very vividly and 
expressively great depth of emotion, as well as reflecting the social 
and intimate life of the people. Though gruesome in details they 
always express genuine pathos, but seldom teach a moral lesson ; their 
plots are brief and simple, always implying a degree of probability 
which renders them intensely impressive and dramatic. 

The subject-matter of the mountain ballad is of a popular nature, 
appealing to all the people as a whole. It consists of "riddles, miracu- 
lous harvests, elopements, love affairs that ended unfortunately, bat- 
tles, shipwrecks, enchantments, fairy stories, return of the dead, 
secular and religious legends, and all things of a like nature which 
were momentous in any way." 

In order to appreciate the full value and beauty of the songs one 
must hear them sung to the tuneful melodies, as the mountaineer 
alone knows how to sing them, for the rhythm is the keynote of their 
appeal. In fact so pervasive is the lilt in some ballads that they 
cannot be recited at all ; they must be sung. 

The North Carolina mountain section is one of the richest localities 
in ballad material of any section of the United States. There are 
corn husking songs, tobacco stripping songs, traditional songs, war 
songs, and songs which show the Indian influence. The latter were 
for the most part inspired by the striking natural phenomena of the 
mountains. Surrounded by such inexplicable mysteries as the rumb- 
ling mountains and isolated tower at Chimney Rock, the weird Brown 
Mountain light, the cave at Linville Falls, and the famous Blowing 
Eock, it is not at all surprising that the fanciful minds of the Chero- 
kees should have woven around them many legendary songs. 

The three American wars have been responsible for a goodly num- 
ber of ballads, which are today being sung by our southern highland- 
ers. A popular favorite is one used originally by the Confederate 
soldiers in the "War between the States," which mentions the Louisi- 
ana Tigers and Buck Rangers of Pennsylvania, whose names grew out 
of bucktails on their caps. 



26 The St. Mart's Muse 



Another Confederate song adaption of Yankee Doodle is : 

"Yankee Doodle had a mind 

To whip the Southern traitors, 
Because they didn't choose to live 
On codfish and pertaters." 

Several of the war songs are due to the influence of the French 

and Indian War, as well as the War of the American Revolution, 

while the text of the following would indicate it to be a conglomerated 

medley of several wars : 

"Brave Washington, he led the way to victory and renown, 
Planted the tree of liberty Great Britain can't pull down; 
The roots they spread from shore to shore, 

The branches reach the sky; 
The cause of freedom we adore, 

"Will conquer, boys, or die. 

Brave Tennessee has sent a band 

To fight at New Orleans; 
With British blood we'll wash the land, 

The Tories cord the sea. 

And with a shout our eagle roared, 

And fluttered as she flew; 
Her arms are like a lion grown, 

Her arms are ever true. 

There's Iowa and Kentucky, 

New knights with heart and hand; 
There's several, too, the north we'll fight, 

Our union to defend." 

Many of the mountain songs are of very ancient origin. Recently 
it has been ascertained that more than three hundred of them are 
only modern versions of old English and Scotch ballads, which cen- 
turies ago were chanted in the old country by the ancestors of those 
who now hold them in cherished possession. In fact, most of them 
came into existence as early as the first part of the 12th century. 
In this class belong "Barbara Allan," "Fair Ellen and Sweet Wil- 
liam," "Fair Ellendu," "Three Black Crows,"' "Sweet William," 
"The Six Fair Maids," "The Seventh King's Daughter," and "The 
Wife of Usher's Well." 






The St. Mary's Muse 27 



In sortie cases the original songs bore different names from those 
by which we now know them. Yet modern people still sing them to 
the very old times. "Barbara Allan" is a mere modification of the 
age old Scotch ballad, "Bonny Barbara Allan.''' From an entry made 
by Pepys in his diary January 2, 1666, w T e know that this song was 
in vogue at that time : 

It was in and about the Martimas time, 

When the green leaves were a' fallin', 
That Sir John Graeme, in the West Country, 

Fell in love with Barbara Allan. 

He sent his man down through the town, 

To the place where she was dwelling; 
"O haste and come to my master dear, 

Gin ye be Barbara Allan." 

hooly, hooly, rose she up, 

To the place where he was lying, 
And when she drew the curtains by, 

"Young man, I think you're dying." 

"0 it's I'm sick, and very, very sick, 

And 'tis a' for Barbara Allan;" 
"0 the better for me ye's never be, 

Though your heart's blood were a'spillin'." 

"0 dinna ye mind, young man," said she, 

"When ye was in the tavern a' drinkin', 
That ye made the healths gae round and round, 

And slighted Barbara Allan?" 

He turned his face unto the wall, 

And death was with him dealing; 
"Adieu, adieu, my dear friends all, 

And be kind to Barbara Allan." 

And slowly, slowly raise she up, 

And slowly, slowly left him, 
And sighing said she could not stay, 

Since death of life had reft him. 

She had not gane a mile but twa, 

When she heard the dead-bell ringing; 
And every jow that the dead-bell gi'd, 

It cried, "Woe to Barbara Allan!" 

"0 Mother, Mother, make my bed, 

make it saft and narrow; 
Since my love died for me today, 

I'll die for him tomorrow." 



28 



The St. Mart's Muse 



This was surely the favorite song of all. The young and the old 
were on their feet at once. All were enchanted by the magic charm 
of the melody. They danced as I had never seen people dance before 
and as they danced, they sang lustily with full open lungs, supremely 
happy and all unmindful of me and the little fire-flicker children 
who looked on from their shadowy corners. For there it is decreed 
always that : 

"The nights shall be filled with music, 

And the cares that infest the day 
Shall fold their tents like the Arabs, 
And as silently steal away." 



Special honorable mention was made of the essay of Catharine 
Miller, "Symbols in the Christian Religion," which space prevents 
our printing here. 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 



The Valedictory 

Mary T. Yellott 
It is a privilege rather than a pleasure that is mine today, for it is 
never a pleasure to say farewell to people and places we have loved. 
This is called our Commencement Day, and rightly, for we are indeed 
commencing life anew; and yet it is not of that life into which we 
are born today that we are thinking, but rather of the life which is 
just past — a life endeared to us through four happy years of storm 
and shine together; a life which will live forever in our memories. 
So it is with a feeling of sadness that I, as representing the Class 
of 1920, come to bid you farewell. It is hard to say good-bye to our 
beloved Rector and kind Lady Principal ; to the Faculty, and espe- 
cially those who have been our teachers and advisers throughout our 
school career. It is hard to say good-bye to our schoolmates, who, 
from the littlest Prep to the most dignified Junior, have been an inte- 
gral part of our life here and are closely associated with many of our 
happiest memories. But it is hardest of all to say farewell to you, 
dear classmates, who in these years together have felt "the bonds of 
friendship strengthen" until it is now impossible to break them. And 
they must not be broken. We have devised various plans for pre- 
serving the unity of our class, but even if these should not be carried 
out, in our love for St. Mary's we will still be one in spirit. So to 
our Alma Mater I shall not say good-bye, for in losing the actual 
protection of her "guiding arms," we are in reality only drawing 
closer to the heart of her. 

And now, with an earnest prayer for St. Mary's and for you, 
friends all, I bid you an affectionate farewell. 

"Go thou thy way and I go mine, 

Apart, yet not afar; 
Only a thin veil hangs between 

The pathways where we are. 
And God keep watch 'tween thee and me — 

This is my prayer; 
He looks thy way; He looketh mine — 

God keep us near." 



30 The St. Mart s Muse 



THE CLASS DAY EXERCISES 
History of the Class of 1920 

Jaxe Toy 

It was "a jolly band of Freshmen" that gathered in the Latin room 
some fifty strong, four years ago, to organize what is now the Class 
of 1920. Then it was that our class came into being, but this "jolly 
band of Freshmen" was very different from the Senior Class of today. 
Only four of us, "Moke," Xancy, "Batts," and Sara, can claim the 
honor of being charter-members of our class, and most of us, at that 
time either had not entered St. Mary's, or were still mere Preplets. 

To these Freshmen of 1916 we owe many things — our organization, 
our adviser, Mr. Cruikshank, our colors, white and green, and our 
motto, "Ever onward, ever upward." With jSTancy Woolford as 
president, this first year of our class history passed with many good 
times, notably the "Baby Party" given us by the Juniors in the fall 
and our return Freshman-Junior dance in the Spring. 

In the spring also came the celebration of St. Mary's 75th anni- 
versary, in which many of us took part. The close of this year, 
1916-17, is remembered by the abolition of the Alpha Bho Literary 
Society, which caused some of us to transfer our allegiance to the 
Sigma Lambda and E A n. And while here among us these things 
were happening, outside St. Mary's great events were taking place, 
for the United States had just entered the war. 

It was the war that occupied our thoughts during these months 
and when we came back in September it was to begin a "war year" 
at St. Mary's. Our class, no longer jolly Freshmen, but learned 
Sophomores, had shrunk considerably, and now numbered only nine- 
teen. Helen Battle, as president, led us through a happy year, 
marked by the Song Contest party given us by the Seniors, and our 
Irish party to them. But most of all, of course, the year was marked 
by war work ; what vivid pictures the name recalls ! Pictures of 
panting girls tugging at lawn mowers in the clean-up teams; of 



The St. Maey's Muse 31 



flushed maidens in straw hats weeding Miss Lee's war-garden, and 
of businesslike damsels in becoming white veils making surgical 
dressings ; pictures of cards of green thrift stamps, and echoes of the 
song, "Where, Oh Where Has My White Eoll Gone!" 

But other things besides war work stood out in the year of 1917-18. 
For one thing, it marked the entrance of many of us at St. Mary's, 
about half of our class, in fact, arriving then. The May Day festi- 
val of 1918 we remember, when under Miss "Gym" Barton's direc- 
tion we displayed our agility in Highland Flings, Scotch reels, and 
flag drills — to do honor to the May Queen, Katharine Drane. After 
May Day the days flew fast, and before we could realize it Commence- 
ment had come, and Dr. Lay read out our names as "promoted to be 
Juniors." 

Juniors ! We felt a little awed at the honor, a little uncertain as 
to our new responsibilities as "Upper Classmen." Many changes 
had taken place when we came back in the fall ; our new Rector wel- 
comed us, and we saw many improvements in the buildings, especially 
in the remodeled schoolroom. Our class, by this time, had begun to 
take its final shape, for it included nineteen of our present twenty-five 
members. With Mary Yellott as president we started our activities 
by a "Baby Party" to the Freshmen, at which we acted as nurses of 
all descriptions, from black mammies to trim French maids. 

The year began under difficulties, however, in the shape of the 
"flu," but even this was over at last and we settled down to hard work, 
for we couldn't afford not to pass now. Then, in November, came 
the signing of the armistice, and in spite of our newly acquired 
upper-class dignity we rivaled the giddiest of the Preps in the snake 
dance around the grove, one of us even leading it, to the tune of dust- 
pans and tin whistles. It was glorious to know that the war was 
over, and we began to look forward to the homecoming of the boys — 
a wish which was realized in the spring, when with the return of the 
113th we had another gala day. 

With the spring, too, came several happenings of importance to 
our class, the "adorable" Valentine party given us by the Freshmen, 
and the crowning event of the year, the Junior-Senior Banquet. 



32 The St. Mart's Muse 



How we racked our brains for ideas, and how we labored in carrying 
them out ! But it was worth the trouble, we all agreed, for we were 
glad to do our utmost for the Seniors of '19. 

Class Day, with the making of the daisy chain, came next, and 
none of us will ever forget our trip to Cameron field at four o'clock 
in the morning in search of ever-elusive daisies. But Commencement 
was over all too soon, and we parted for the summer in eager antici- 
pation of the year to come. 

September found us back again, with Nancy Lay as president, to 
begin the last, and what we hoped would be the nicest, year of our 
class history. And now, in looking back upon the year, I think that 
our hopes have not been disappointed. It has been a year filled with 
many good times, such as the Thanksgiving trip to Chapel Hill, The 
Birds' Christmas Carol and the wonderful banquet given us by the 
Juniors only a little while ago. But it is not only the gala days of 
the year that have been filled with pleasure, for as we look back, even 
the days which as they passed seemed humdrum are filled with 
happy memories of work and play together. 

The year has made us realize more than ever before how much we 
owe our Alma Mater, and now as we are about to leave her, it is our 
earnest wish that we may never fail to prove ourselves worthy of the 
title of graduates of St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse 33 



THE CL0SS POEM 

Mary T. Yellott 

'Ever onward, ever upward," we have struggled 

Through four long years of sunshine and of shower, 
Through four long years of work and play together, 

Seeking always for the knowledge that is power. 
Now, whether we have found it or have missed it, 

We've gained at last the goal we long have sought, 
And, having climbed the lofty tree of knowledge, 

The time we spent in climbing seems but short. 

So here we stand, upon the windswept summit, 
And, wistful, view the world that beckons on; 

Half fearful of the strange on-coming future, 
Half wishing for the days forever gone. 

Yet here we stand. Tomorrow will not find us 

Still standing where the brook and river meet, 
But having left the dear old days behind us 

Pressing on with eager eyes and anxious feet 
To broader fields of action, always happy 

In doing things we learned while here to do; 
And in the joy of life and love and service 

To the mem'ry of St. Mary's ever true. 



34 The St. Mart's Muse 



THE CLASS PROPHECY 

Mary Hoke 
In the good year 1940, 

Just twenty years, you mind, 
Since we parted on our several ways 

To see what we might find, 
I one day began to wonder 

Just what had been the fate 
Of all the Class of '20— 

I really couldn't wait 
To write them all and ask them, 

So I began to look around 
In all the latest papers, 

And this is what I found. 

Shelby, N. C, May 5.— The very popular play, "The Follies of Fashion," 
which was given here on Monday night with Miss Margaret Rawlings as the 
star of the evening, was greeted with great enthusiasm by all who attended, 
except our fellow-citizen, Miss Millicent Blanton. This maiden lady quite 
distinguished herself in an ardent harangue against the evils of the theater, 
and steps will have to be taken to stop her if the people of Shelby do not 
wish the theater to be entirely expunged from the town. 

Venice, Italy, June 12.— The contract for planning the new gardens of the 
Prime Minister of Italy has been put into the hands of Miss Alice Cheek, the 
noted American landscape gardener, who has risen steadily in her work for 
the past twenty years. 

Charlotte, N. C, Aug. 4.— The mystery attached to the disappearance of 
Mr. John Green has not yet been solved, but our local detective, Miss Ade- 
laide Smith, who has just returned from New York, has taken the case in 
hand, and we hope that all difficulties will soon be cleared away. 

Chicago, 111., July 15.— Since the National Art Exhibit in this city, at 
which the paintings of Miss Nancy Lay gained so much distinction, the 
leading art critics of this country and Europe have prevailed upon her to 
spend next winter abroad in order to use her talent in a new field. 

Hamilton, N. C, Sept. 3.— The confusion which ensued from last night's 
burglary episode was calmed down mainly by the bravery and energy of our 
native policeman, Officer Sherrod. This is not the first time she has saved 
the situation, and the daring way in which she climbed through the window 
and seized the culprit is worthy of the highest praise. 



The St. Mary's Muse 35 



The Scientific Farmer, May 3. — We are happy to announce that the prize 
for the best collection of preserved fruits has been awarded to Mrs. Silas 
Jenkins, who before her marriage was Miss Katherine Batts, of Tarboro, N. C. 
Mrs. Jenkins lives in an obscure hamlet in southern Idaho, where she and 
her husband are engaged in applying scientific principles of farming. She 
is one of our most regular subscribers, and it gives us great pleasure to 
present her with the patented potato peeler promised as the prize in this 
contest. 

Columbia University, Oct. 5. — An important scientific discovery has just 
been made by Miss Ruth Womble, Dean of the Science Department of this 
University. Miss Womble deserves unlimited credit for this, since it will 
be of the greatest use to scientists the world over. 

Fifth Avenue, N. Y., Sept. 20. — Mile. Lucy London Anderson wishes to 
announce the opening of her Parisian Millinery Shop at 205 Fifth Avenue. 
Latest styles — exclusive prices. All are asked to attend the opening, which 
will take place on Tuesday. Only French will be spoken. 

Asheboro, N. C, Oct. 7. — The people of Asheboro took a holiday yesterday 
to celebrate the triumph of Miss Mary Moffitt in the World's Tennis Tourna- 
ment. Miss Moffitt sailed for England four weeks ago, where the finals with 
the champion from Australia were to take place. We had waited with im- 
patience for the result, but were confident of Miss Moflfitt's success. 

Thomasville, N. C, June 6. — The Sunday School picnic which took place 
on Saturday was largely attended and greatly enjoyed by young and old 
alike. The success of the affair was due to the zeal and efforts of the 
enthusiastic superintendent, Miss Audrey Stone. 

Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 20. — The well-known globe trotter, Miss Rainsford 
Glass, who is noted for her extensive journeys to distant lands, and who has 
just returned from London, where she saw her former roommate defeat the 
Australian tennis champion, has paused in her travels long enough to spend 
a week in Nashville and see Sewanee's victory over Vanderbilt in the Thanks- 
giving football game. 

Atlanta, Ga., Nov. 30.— The Grand Opera season opened tonight, featuring 
as leading soloist Miss Sara Lorton Davis, who has been easily the hit of the 
past season in New York. Miss Davis lived up to her reputation, and we 
predict for her world-wide fame. 

Louisville, Ky., Mar. 5. — The Rev. and Mrs. Robert Brown recently arrived 
in the city, Mr. Brown to have charge of St. Luke's Episcopal Church. Mrs. 
Brown was before her marriage Miss Eleanor Sublett, of Harrisonburg, Va., 
and by her charming manner has already endeared herself to the hearts of 
the parishioners. 



3® The St. Mart's Muse 



Washington, D. C, Dec. l.-A heated debate took place in the Senate today 
between the Hon. Jane Toy and the Hon. Eugenia Thomas, Senators from 
North Carolina and Georgia, respectively. These ladies graduated in the 
same class from St. Mary's School, Raleigh, but they apparently forgot all 
their past relations for the time being and attacked each other with zest in 
the interest of their cause. 

Baltimore, Md., April 3.-The success of Alphonzo Petrarch's musical 
comedy, "The Mad Maidens of Mars," which was presented here last evening, 
was due to the unusually attractive and spirited band of chorus girls, the 
most prominent among whom was Miss Mary Yellott. Miss Yellott discov- 
ered her talent along this line when she took the part of Boatswain in 
"Pinafore" at the end of her school career, and since then she has been a 
popular figure in many musical comedies. 

Hong Kong, China, July 7.— The friends and fellow workers of Miss 
Pauline Miller are distressed at her being obliged to leave the city. But her 
energy and zeal have urged her to go into more isolated parts of the interior, 
where the missionaries are few and far between. 

Richmond, Va., Oct. 25.— Probably the most elaborate and enjoyable of the 
festivities of the season was the reception last night at the home of Miss 
Catharine Miller, given in honor of her guests from Henderson, N. C. Miss 
Miller is one of the most prominent leaders of the social activities of the city. 

El Paso, Tex., Sept. 3.— The Army and Navy Journal announces the promo- 
tion of Private Annie Duncan to the rank of Corporal. Her many friends 
in this city, where she has been stationed for some time, feel that she truly 
deserves this honor for her bravery in chasing a Mexican bandit over the 
border in the recent skirmish. 

Mayodan, N. C, Aug. 20.— We are very fortunate in having with us for a 
few days Dr. Jane Reynolds Ruffin, the eminent surgeon, who is making a 
tour of the South for the instruction of local physicians. Dr. Ruffin is 
a native of this city and we are sorry that her busy career does not allow 
her to visit us more often. 

Tarrytown-on-the-Hudson, May 29.-^he Castle is very fortunate in having 
obtained as its physical training director for the coming year Miss Annie 
Higgs, of Greenville, N. C. After specializing in physical culture at St. 
Mary's School, Raleigh, she attended more advanced institutions and is well 
equipped for her position. 



The St. Mart's Muse 37 



Greenland, Nov. 20.— The "Greenland Iceburg" has just heard of the landing 
on our coasts of the famous aviators, Misses Cooper and Boyd. Great is the 
excitement over having them honor us with a visit. After graduating from 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, these young ladies went to an institution of 
higher learning, where they mastered the art of flying. 

And so at last my list's complete. 

As you, no doubt, surmise 
Each one of them, except a few, 

Has caused me great surprise. 
Oh, goodness, there's the fire alarm, 

So I'll have to say good-bye, 
And go to get my engine out, 

For a great fire chief am I. 



38 The St. Mart's Muse 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF THE CLASS OF 1920 

Margaret Rawungs 

We, the Senior Class of St. Mary's School, of this city of Raleigh, 
of this county of Wake, of this State of North Carolina, being of 
supposedly sound mind, memory and understanding, do hereby make, 
publish and declare the following as and for our last will and 
testament : 

First. I, Millicent Blanton, do will and bequeath to Fielding 
Douthat my ability to sing, so that, should she give an Expression 
Recital next year, she may charm her audience with a vocal solo as 
well as with her charming impersonations. 

Second. I, Eleanor Sublett, do devise and bequeath to Nancy 
Hart my dignity and stately bearing, so that she will not have to be 
worried with acquiring it during her Senior year. 

Third. I, Nancy Lay, do hereby will to Dorothy Kirtland my 
wonderful public dignity and executive ability, so that she may be 
successful in leading the Senior Class of 1921. 

Fourth. I, Catharine Miller, do give and bequeath to Katharine 
Waddell this copy of Patience, to help her in securing material for 
the Sigma Lambda Muse next year. 

Fifth. I, Jane Euffin, do devise and bequeath to Susan Collier 
my ability to collect "Muse Dues" and get "ads," so that next year 
she may come out even with her finances. 

Sixth. We, Lucy London Anderson and Margaret Rawlings, in 
a generous frame of mind, do hereby bequeath to Betty Bonner our 
knack of going downtown on all occasions, so that she may have as 
many "once-a-weeks" as she wants next year. 



The St. Mary's Muse 39 



Seventh. "We, Alice Cheek, Patty Sherrod, Adelaide Smith, 
Mary Moffitt, Annie Higgs and Millicent Blanton, do will to the 
''Timeless Six'' our voices, so that they may be able to render ''Good- 
bye, School, We're Through," with deep emotion at the School Party 
next year. 

Eighth. We, the Senior Class, do give and devise to the Seniors 
of 1921 our key to Senior Hall, with the sincere hope that it may be 
in its proper place at the proper time on, at least, two or three 
occasions. 

Ninth. We, the Senior Class, do devise and bequeath to the 
Preps our colors — green and white — to be worn by them until the 
good year, 1921. 

Tenth. We, the Senior Class, do bequeath to the girls of St. 
Mary's, one and all, deep affection, with the hope that we may live in 
their memories for some time to come. 

Eleventh. We, the Senior Class, do hereby bequeath to the 
Faculty our steadfast love and deep appreciation for all their efforts 
in our behalf. 

Twelfth. We, the Senior Class, do give and devise to Miss 
Lizzie Lee sincere love and warm thanks for her many kindnesses to 
us during the year. 

Thirteenth. We, the Senior Class, do will and bequeath to Mr. 
Ernest Cruikshank our undying friendship and sincere thanks for 
his constant guidance during our days at St. Mary's. 

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the testator, the Senior 
Class, at its request and for its last will and testament, in the presence 
of each other, having hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses this 
twenty-fourth day of May, nineteen hundred and twenty. 

Witnesses : ISTanct Lay, 

Mabgaeet Rawlings, 
Patty Shebeod. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



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A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
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editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1919-20 

Mary T. Yellott, '20, Editor-in-Chief 
Catharine Miller, '20 Catharine Boyd, '20 

Crichton Thorne, '23 Mabel Norfleet, '23 

Frances Venable, '22 Louise Powell, '22 

Jane Ruffin, '20, Business Manager 
Ernest Cruikshank, Faculty Director 



EDITORIAL 

And so the year is over — its trials and tribulations, its frolic and 
its fun. School closed on Tuesday, and by Wednesday noon St. 
Mary's was quite forsaken by all except its summer stand-bys, and 
the buildings had already assumed the air of dejection characteris- 
tic of deserted dwellings. Only Ducky's cheery voice was to be heard 
in Senior Hall, that home of cheer, as she went determinedly about 
bringing order out of the chaos left by the Seniors in their tearful 
exit. And, while not for a moment forgotten by those left behind, 
the only actual reminders of the departed girls were the inevitable 
telegrams, a Please look in my left-hand dresser drawer and send me 
my bedroom slippers !" 

With this closing number of the monthly Muse the journalistic 
career of the 1920 editorial staff comes to an end — whether glorious 
or otherwise we leave it to others to judge. We are proud of having 
accomplished what we set out to do; humble that we have done no 



The St. Mary's Muse 41 



more. This, however, is the eighth issue of our Muse, and it may 
not be amiss briefly to sum up the activities of the year, as outlined 
in the Opening Number. 

The Athletic Associations have maintained their high standard 
of spirit and of deed. Sigmas and Mus alike have struggled valiantly 
through Basketball, Volleyball, Tennis and the Meet, sometimes win- 
ning, sometimes losing, but always with a smile, and hope for better 
luck next time. The final victory went to the Sigmas, so that next 
year they will have to revise their yell, "A Red and White banner 
will hang upon that wall !" 

The Junior Auxiliary, in its different way, has been equally suc- 
cessful. Under the direction of Katharine Batts, the Chapters have 
done some very creditable work, a report of which was made at the 
final inter-Chapter meeting, and with which Miss Katie was well 
satisfied. The "Blue Ridge Inspiration" is making itself felt more 
and more at St. Mary's, and the twelve delegates to the Conference 
this year have a splendid opportunity before them. 

It is generally admitted that the Literary Societies have taken 
several strides forward this year under the able leadership of their 
enthusiastic presidents. The Literary Society Contest, as described 
in the Opening Number, resulted in victory for the Epsilon Alpha 
Pi, and the prizes offered for the best story, essay, sketch and poem 
were awarded respectively to Crichton Thorne, Eleanor Sublett, Jane 
Toy and Mary Yellott. These announcements, made on Class Day, 
showed that this year we did not begin anything we could not finish, 
and finish well. 

And so the year is over! It has been a happy year — it will be 
a happy memory in years to come. And it is with hearts reechoing 
the words that we can truly sing : 

"Let us hope, though now we say 'Farewell,' 
We'll be back, in the sweet by and by!" 



42 The St. Mary's Muse 



SCHOOL NEWS 
May 8th— The "School Party" 

The ninth annual "School Party" was held in the parlor on Satur- 
day evening, May 8th, following the general plan of these parties since 
their institution by the Freshman Class of 1912. While the "School 
Party" is the "beginning of the end" of the school year, still, as 
Nancy Lay, the Senior President, pointed out in her address of wel- 
come, it is "not a time for tears, and if the tears will come they are 
neither those of gladness that the year is so nearly over, nor of sorrow 
for lost opportunities, but just an overflow of good old St. Mary's feel- 
ing. But there are better ways of showing that feeling than by tears." 
This the Seniors emphasized in their welcoming song, and, perhaps in 
accordance with their request, perhaps because the program was 
intentionally rather comic than tragic, tears were very little in 
evidence. 

The parlor was prettily decorated, as usual, with streamers of the 
School colors in the center and of the various Class colors in the 
corners of the room where the classes were to sit. The arrangement 
was slightly different from in the past, for instead of being ranged 
along the side, the Seniors were seated in a semi-circle at one end of 
the parlor with the piano in its accustomed place. The classes in 
attractive costumes featuring their colors, entered beginning with the 
Preps, singing: "In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees," and last of all 
came the twenty-five Seniors, very stately in their caps and gowns. 

After the welcome, the President of each class responded and the 
classes sang their songs, all newly written to popular airs for the 
occasion. An especial hit was made by the six Juniors in their 
"tuneless song," the words of which were fitted by Katharine Waddell 
to the familiar round, "Three Blind Mice," and which the "Tuneless 
Six" sang with great "zest." A novelty was introduced in the Senior 
Medley, combining the songs of the Class of 1920 "from their Prep- 
dom to today," with the strain of Helen Battle's "We're Seniors" 
running through the whole. 



The St. Mary's Muse 43 



Next came the "Echoes of the Year," always a feature of the 
"School Party," and this part of the program was as follows : 

Song: Mary's Troubles (Spats and Chapel Caps) Dorothy Kirtland 

Grace Franklin 

Duet: In the Old Swing on Senior Hall 

Bessie Brown 

Recitation: Fire Drill Mary Louise Everett 

Song: The Latest Fashion Anne Kirtland 

Monologue: "In Quarantine" Fielding Douthat 

Song: Perfect Posture Estelle Avent 

The next number was a The Senior's Tribute" to Mr. Cruikshank, 
their Class Adviser, delivered by Millicent Blanton with more than 
her usual effectiveness. This was a slight expression of the Seniors' 
gratitude for all that Mr. Cruikshank has done for them, and the 
prolonged applause at the end testified not only to the success with 
which the poem was rendered but to the fact that the entire school, as 
well as the Class of '20, recognizes and appreciates the value of Mr. 
Cruikshank's sympathy and help. Then followed the "Toasts" to 
the Rector and Lady Principal, to Miss Katie, the Faculty, and the 
Girls. After Audrey Stone had sung, "We'll Be Back," a song to 
the tune of "Madelon," written last year for the "Junior-Senior 
Banquet" but not used until this School Party, there was an inter- 
mission for the refreshments, served by the Juniors. When this 
excitement had subsided the Seniors rose once more at a chord from 
the piano, this time to sing the two farewell songs, without which 
it would hardly be the "School Party" at all, "Good-bye, 1920," and 
"Good-bye, School, We're Through !" When the last soft notes of 
the Seniors' farewell had died away the School united in singing, 
"Alma Mater," and the party came to an end with the last words of 
the song: 

Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom and love. 



44 The St. Mary's Muse 



May 12th— Alumnae Day 

The twelfth of May was celebrated as usual as Alumnae Day, and 
the Alumna? Luncheon, so many years a feature of the day and 
omitted last year, was resumed. The School was given a half holiday 
in honor of St. Mary's seventy-eighth birthday, and the girls appeared 
in the dining-room at 1 :30 in gala attire. They were seated around 
the sides of the room, the center being reserved for the Alumnae, of 
whom there were many in attendance. The luncheon was as delicious 
as those who had had previous experience with Mrs. Marriott's lunch- 
eons had anticipated, and after the fruit salad had been removed Mrs. 
Perkins briefly welcomed the guests and regretting the absence of the 
Hector called on Mr. Stone to act as toastmaster. 

-Nancy Lay, president of the Senior Class, welcomed the visitors 
in the name of the School, and Mrs. J. J. Bernard, representing the 
Ealeigh Chapter, responded, expressing their pleasure at having 
a share in the birthday party. The Bishop made a brief talk, and 
his daughter, Mrs. Tucker, excused herself from speaking on the sub- 
ject, "St. Mary's Girls Abroad," on the score of ignorance, but voiced 
the hope that some of the girls before her would go into Mission work 
abroad and so come back one clay qualified to speak on the subject. 
Miss Nell Battle Lewis gave an interesting talk on the importance 
of a college education to the woman of today, a subject in which she 
is deeply interested and about which she is qualified to speak from her 
own experience. Mrs. H. W. Whichard (Miss Patty Carroll), 
a member of the Norfolk Chapter, briefly described their Alumnae 
meetings, and Miss Dowd spoke at some length on the St. Mary's 
of her day, concluding with a beautiful and touching tribute to Miss 
Katie. 

The Alumnae Meeting in the parlor was the next event. Here the 
Iredell Memorial window was discussed, and a committee appointed 
to confer with Mr. Way as to the time and manner of the unveiling. 
Another matter of interest which came up before the meeting was the 
question of providing St. Mary's with a proper entrance way. After 



The St. Mary's Muse 45 



the business had been satisfactorily disposed of or referred to the 
proper committee, a very pleasing program was rendered by some of 
the girls. Miss Fenner's "Living Pictures" posed again, and Field- 
ing Douthat, Mary Louise Everett and Margaret Elliott gave the little 
fantasy, "The Traveling Man," which they had presented with such 
success at the Sigma Lambda Model Meeting. Estelle Avent sang 
"When Miss Katie Was a Teeny Little Girl," which seemed singu- 
larly appropriate with the alumna? grouped around beneath the two 
old portraits of Bishop Ives and Bishop Kavenscroft. 

The meeting adjourned in the neighborhood of five o'clock, and the 
alumna? dispersed, all voting it a very pleasant birthday celebration. 

May 15th— The Choral Club Presents "H. M. S. Pinafore" 

The St. Mary's Auditorium was — in imagination — transformed on 
Saturday evening, May 15th, to the deck of the good ship "Pinafore," 
when the Choral Club, in the guise of sailors, sisters, cousins and 
aunts, entertained the school and a large number of visitors with 
a very creditable amateur production of Gilbert and Sullivan's ever- 
popular operetta, "H. M. S. Pinafore, or The Lass Who Loved 
a Sailor." As it was impossible to do any adequate staging, none was 
attempted, but whatever atmosphere was lacking was more than sup- 
plied by the nifty uniformed sailor lads who were discovered, upon 
the rising of the curtain, engaged in playing cards, shooting craps, 
and other sports equally unknown to St. Mary's. Under the able 
direction of Mr. W. H. Jones, and thanks to Miss Davis' training, 
the girls took their parts very well, especially the lordly Admiral, 
Sir Joseph Porter, played by Elizabeth Sabiston, and Dick Deadeye, 
played by Lorraine Smythe, who though she had not the deep voice 
usually considered a characteristic of Deadeye nevertheless suc- 
ceeded in bringing down the house several times, which after all, is 
the end and aim of a comedian. The parts of the hero and heroine, 
Kalph and Josephine, were well played by Audrey Stone and Estelle 
Avent. Miss Avent in Josephine's long solo-soliloquy had an oppor- 
tunity to display her range of voice, of which she took full advantage. 
She sang throughout with ease and was, perhaps, as she should have 



46 The St. Mart's Muse 

been, the star performer. The white clad Middies and the sisters, 
cousins and aunts in evening gowns made an effective background, 
and showed careful drilling in the choruses. 

The cast of characters was as follows : 

The Rt. Hon. Sir Joseph Porter, K.C.B., First Lord of the Admiralty, 

Miss Elizabeth Sabiston 

Captain Corcoran, commanding H. M. S. Pinafore Miss Bessie Brown 

Ralph Rackstraw, able seaman Miss Audrey Stone 

Dick Deadeye, able seaman Miss Lorraine Smythe 

Bill Bobstay, boatswain Miss Mary Yellott 

Tom Tucker, midshipmite Miss Muriel Dougherty 

Josephine, the captain's daughter Miss Estelle Avent 

Hebe, Sir Joseph's first cousin Miss Mary Ellen Travis 

Little Buttercup, a Portsmouth bumboat woman Miss Nancy Lay 

May 16th — New Muse Club Members Admitted 

The members-elect of the Muse Club for 1920-21 were admitted 
on Sunday evening, May 16th. The Muse Club is the goal of every 
St. Mary's girl's ambition, and to be elected to membership at the end 
of one's first year is a high honor indeed. Out of the eleven new 
members seven were first year girls — Dorothy Baum, Louise Egle- 
ston, Rebecca Hines, Elizabeth Nelson, Eleanor Tiplady, Lor- 
raine Smythe and Emma Villepigue. The four old girls elected were 
Mary Louise Everett, Virginia Jordan, Mabel Norfleet and Crichton 
Thorne. After being welcomed by the chairman, Eleanor Sublett, 
and her usual assistant on such occasions, Mary Yellott, the new 
members responded, expressing their appreciation of the honor con- 
ferred upon them, and the meeting then adjourned to "The Cottage," 
where Mrs. Cruikshank graciously received the bevy of laughing, 
chatting girls, threatening almost to overflow the diminutive bunga- 
low. There, after refreshments in the form of delicious strawberry 
Charlotte Russe and cakes had been served, it seemed appropriate 
that Millicent Blanton should recite "The Seniors' Tribute" to Mr. 
Cruikshank, which she did with deep feeling, and to which he 
responded in kind. The informal meeting then adjourned, being the 
last regular meeting of the year, and next to assemble under the new 
chairman, Frances Venable. 



The St. Mary's Muse 47 



This admission of new members marked the close of what might 
he called ''Election Week." The Sunday night previous, Frances 
Venable had been elected chairman, and Susan Collier business man- 
ager of the Muse. The prospective Seniors reelected Dorothy Kirt- 
land president of the class. The Literary Society elections were 
held on Tuesday evening, resulting in the election of Lena Simmons, 
president of the Sigma Lambda, and Elizabeth Nolan of the Epsilon 
Alpha Pi; and Katharine Waddell and Louise Egieston, associate 
editors of the monthly Muse; Sigma Lambda and E A n respec- 
tively. The athletic associations held their elections the following 
Saturday noon, the Sigmas choosing Dorothy Baum president, and 
the Mus, Emma Villepigue. 

Under such able leaders, the outgoing Seniors feel confident that 
things will move along next year without a hitch, and The Muse 
wishes to extend to the newly elected officers its heartiest congratula- 
tions and best wishes for success. 

May 17th— The "Garden Party" 

The Faculty and Seniors were much surprised on Saturday, May 
15th, at receiving formal invitations to a "Garden Party"' to be given 
by Mrs. Perkins and Miss Lee on Monday evening. In the experi- 
ence at least of the Seniors and the younger members of the Faculty, 
such a thing was an utter novelty, and so it was with no little 
excitement that the guests decked themselves in their party finery 
and picked their way through the darkness to the place designated in 
the invitation, behind the Auditorium. Once there, however, the 
darkness gave way before the magic light of Japanese lanterns, 
which cast a soft glow over the familiar spot and transformed it into 
a kind of strange fairyland. The guests, on passing through the 
rose-twined arch, were welcomed by the lovely hostesses, and on look- 
ing around to discover the source of the music which sounded so 
sweetly on the evening air, Miss Fenner was seen presiding over the 
Yictrola. It was not long before the Seniors were dancing, as free 






48 



The St. Mary's MrsE 



from, care as if no such things as examinations existed — which was, 
perhaps, one of the motives of the delightful party. 

White-aproned butlers served coffee and sandwiches, and after the 
guests had wearied themselves with dancing and laughing — for it 
was a merry party ! — the welcome butlers appeared again, this time 
with strawberry ice cream and cake. The party broke up at ten 
o'clock, and the Seniors thanked Mrs. Perkins and Miss Lee for 
a very happy evening, which, as Miss Lee had wished, they had only 
to enjoy. 



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Patronize those who patronize you. Remember that it is 
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Advertisements 



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